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Author Steell, S.C.; Cooke, S.J.; Eliason, E.J.
Title Artificial light at night does not alter heart rate or locomotor behaviour in Caribbean spiny lobster (Panulirus argus): insights into light pollution and physiological disturbance using biologgers Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Conservation Physiology Abbreviated Journal Conserv Physiol
Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages coaa097
Keywords Animals; accelerometer; biologging; heart rate; light pollution; spiny lobster; stress
Abstract Light pollution is a rapidly growing threat to biodiversity, with many unknown or poorly understood effects on species and ecosystems spanning terrestrial and aquatic environments. Relative to other taxa, the effects of artificial light at night on aquatic invertebrates are poorly understood, despite the abundance and integral significance of invertebrates to marine and freshwater ecosystems. We affixed heart rate and acceleration biologgers to adult Caribbean spiny lobster (Panulirus argus), an ecologically, culturally and economically significant species in the western Atlantic ocean, to test the effect of artificial light at night on this species' physiology and behaviour relative to appropriate controls. The experiment was conducted in a simulated reef mesocosm in The Bahamas with incandescent lighting used to illuminate it at 1 lux, approximating light levels offshore of urban areas. In the conditions tested here, artificial light at night was found to have no effect on heart rate or locomotor activity in P. argus. We observed a dissociation between activity and heart rate at both short-term and long-term temporal scales. Lobsters were more active at night and nocturnal activity was higher in trials closer to new moon; however, heart rate did not vary with diel or lunar cycle. There was less than 8% difference between daytime and night time average heart rate despite the average percentage of time spent active almost tripling in nights versus days, to 19.5% from 7.2%, respectively. Our findings suggest P. argus may have some resilience to low levels of light pollution, which warrants further research on aspects of this species' life history, performance and fitness in the face of this potential anthropogenic disturbance.
Address Department of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA; steell ( at ) ualberta.ca
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Oxford Academic Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2051-1434 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:33304586; PMCID:PMC7720088 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 3378
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Author Challéat, S.; Barré, K.; Laforge, A.; Lapostolle, D.; Franchomme, M.; Sirami, C.; Le Viol, I.; Milian, J.; Kerbiriou, C.
Title Grasping darkness: the dark ecological network as a social-ecological framework to limit the impacts of light pollution on biodiversity Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Ecology and Society Abbreviated Journal E&S
Volume 26 Issue 1 Pages
Keywords Ecology; artificial light at night; darkness; ecological network; land-use planning; light pollution; multilevel approach; participatory processes; social-ecological systems
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is nowadays recognized as a major anthropogenic pressure on the environment on a global scale and as such is called light pollution. Through its attractive or deterrent effects, and its disruption of the biological clock for many animal and plant taxa, ALAN is increasingly recognized as a major threat to global biodiversity, which ultimately alters the amount, the quality, and the connectivity of available habitats for taxa. Biodiversity conservation tools should, therefore, include ALAN spatial and temporal effects. The ecological network, i.e., the physical and functional combination of natural elements that promote habitat connectivity, provides a valuable framework for that purpose. Understood as a social-ecological framework, it offers the opportunity to take into account the multiple uses of nocturnal spaces and times, by humans and nonhumans alike. Here we present the concept of “dark ecological network.” We show this concept is able to grasp the effects of ALAN in terms of habitat disturbances and integrates temporal dimensions of ecological processes into biodiversity conservation planning. Moreover, it is also intended to trivialize the practices of darkness protection by turning them into the ordinary practices of land use planning. From an operational point of view, the challenge is to translate the levers for reducing ALAN-induced effects into a political method for its “territorialization.” To achieve this objective, we propose a course of action that consists of building an interdisciplinary repertoire of contextualized knowledge (e.g., impacts on wildlife, human/lightscape relationship, existing legal tools, etc.), in order to deduce from it a number of practical supports for the governance of the dark ecological network in response to societal and ecological issues.
Address University of Toulouse-Jean Jaurès 5 allées Antonio-Machado 31058 Toulouse Cedex 9, France; samuel.challeat ( at ) univ-tlse2.fr
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Ecology and Society Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1708-3087 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 3377
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Author Bennett, M.M.
Title Is a pixel worth 1000 words? Critical remote sensing and China's Belt and Road Initiative Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Political Geography Abbreviated Journal Political Geography
Volume 78 Issue Pages 102127
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract As a novel means of researching China's Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), this article advances a critical remote sensing agenda that connects the view from above provided by satellite imagery with the grounded, qualitative methodologies more typical of political geography such as ethnographic fieldwork. Satellite imagery is widely used to produce empirics relating to the BRI, and the Chinese state is showing increasing interest in applying Earth observation data to governance. A more critical approach attentive to the politics of remote sensing, especially in light of China's emergence as a space and satellite power and its embrace of big data, is needed to more precisely reveal what changing pixels represent on the ground and expose the potential issues with data captured from high above the planet. This paper offers three theoretical and methodological objectives for critical remote sensing. First, I reflect on the geopolitics involved in the production and analysis of satellite imagery. Second, through analysis of night light imagery, which captures illuminated anthropogenic activities, I interrogate metanarratives of development. Third, I engage with qualitative methods by “ground-truthing” remote sensing with ethnographic observations along China's borders. I also seek to avoid the methodological nationalism often present in remote sensing research by situating these mixed-methods case studies at scales above and below the nation-state. As one of the largest development interventions in history materializes, pursuing critical remote sensing can create opportunities for social scientists to leverage quantitative and geospatial methods in support of more equitable and sustainable futures.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0962-6298 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3376
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Author Wang, R.; Shi, W.; Dong, P.
Title Mapping Dragon Fruit Croplands from Space Using Remote Sensing of Artificial Light at Night Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 12 Issue 24 Pages 4139
Keywords NTL remote sensing; nighttime light; NPP-VIIRS; dragon fruit; Vietnam; VIIRS
Abstract The nighttime light (NTL) on the surface of Earth is an important indicator for the human transformation of the world. NTL remotely sensed data have been widely used in urban development, population estimation, economic activity, resource development and other fields. With the increasing use of artificial lighting technology in agriculture, it has become possible to use NTL remote sensing data for monitoring agricultural activities. In this study, National Polar Partnership (NPP)-Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) NTL remote sensing data were used to observe the seasonal variation of artificial lighting in dragon fruit cropland in Binh Thuan Province, Vietnam. Compared with the statistics of planted area, area having products and production of dragon fruit by district in the Statistical Yearbook of Binh Thuan Province 2018, values of the mean and standard deviation of NTL brightness have significant positive correlations with the statistical data. The results suggest that the NTL remotely sensed data could be used to reveal some agricultural productive activities such as dragon fruits production accurately by monitoring the seasonal artificial lighting. This research demonstrates the application potential of NTL remotely sensed data in agriculture.
Address College of Forestry, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing 100083, China; ruiwang ( at ) bjfu.edu.cn
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher MDPI Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 3375
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Author Grose, M.J.; Jones, T.M.
Title The Impacts of Artificial Light at Night on Urban Ecosystems Type Book Chapter
Year 2020 Publication The Routledge Handbook of Urban Ecology Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Ecology; Review
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Routledge Place of Publication Editor Douglas, I.; Anderson, P.M.L.; Goode, D.; Houck, M.C.; Maddox, D.; Nagendra, H.; Tan, P.Y.
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Routledge Handbooks Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2nd
ISSN ISBN 9781138581357 Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 3374
Permanent link to this record