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Author Sairom, L.; Choon, C.
Title An Analysis of the Classification of Seoul's Environmental Lighting Zones based on a High-Resolution Light Pollution Map – Focusing on the Land-Use of Lighting Zone 3 and Lighting Zone 4 Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of the Architectural Institute of Korea Abbreviated Journal
Volume 36 Issue 11 Pages 171-180
Keywords Planning
Abstract The purpose of this study is to analyze the classification of Seoul's environmental lighting zone based on a high-resolution light pollution map of Seoul. This map was created through a data integration of night time images produced by VIIRS (Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite) and ISS (International Space Station). This map provides a detailed space grid of light pollution which allows for a quantitative analysis of the light pollution in Seoul. There are four different environmental lighting zones in Seoul based on land use: Commercial/Industrial zones, Residential zones, Green zones and Protected natural areas. These zones have corresponding light emission standards by regulation in which the emission standards decrease in the order listed. Using the Grasshopper Image Sampler Algorithm of the light pollution map, this paper examines whether the current environmental lighting zone regulations agree with the current state of light pollution level. The result shows that a lot of residential areas of the 25 District of Seoul have the same or even higher light pollution level than commercial areas. This is because a lot of the residential areas have mix-used facilities where high levels of commercial activities occur at night, making the city at higher risk of light pollution. In lighting zone 3, residential zones, there is a clear pattern showing that 2nd class residential zones, 3rd class residential zones and mixed-use residential areas have higher light pollution levels than purely residential areas and 1st class residential zones. Between commercial zones and industrial zones which are both categorized as lighting zones 4, some industrial zones have lower light emission levels than residential zones at night depending on the type of business. Therefore, this research suggests lighting sub-zones for areas to have higher or lower light emission standards depending on its local land-use conditions and commercial activities for a more efficient way to manage and govern light pollution levels at night.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Korean Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2733-6247 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial (down) 3433
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Author Gibson, J.; Olivia, S.; Boe-Gibson, G.; Li, C.
Title Which night lights data should we use in economics, and where? Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Journal of Development Economics Abbreviated Journal Journal of Development Economics
Volume 149 Issue Pages 102602
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Popular DMSP night lights data are flawed by blurring, top-coding, and lack of calibration. Yet newer and better VIIRS data are rarely used in economics. We compare these two data sources for predicting GDP, especially at the second subnational level, for Indonesia, China and South Africa. The DMSP data are a poor proxy for GDP outside of cities. The gap in predictive performance between DMSP data and VIIRS data is especially apparent at lower levels of the spatial hierarchy, such as for counties, and for lower density areas. The city lights-GDP relationship is twice as noisy with DMSP data than with VIIRS data. Spatial inequality is considerably understated with DMSP data, especially for the urban sector and in higher density areas. A Pareto adjustment to correct for top-coding in DMSP data has a modest effect but still understates spatial inequality and misses key features of economic activity in big cities.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0304-3878 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3432
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Author Pajot, A.; Corbeau, A.; Jambon, A.; Weimerskirch, H.
Title Diel at‐sea activity of two species of great albatrosses: the ontogeny of foraging and movement behaviour Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Journal of Avian Biology Abbreviated Journal J Avian Biol
Volume 52 Issue 2 Pages
Keywords Moonlight; Animals
Abstract The first year of life is a period of high mortality in animals. Reduced foraging capacities of naive individuals might be the primary cause of their mortality. These capacities are supposed to be progressively acquired during the first months of life. In this study, we investigate the ontogeny of flight capacities, by day and night, of first‐year individuals, and compare it with adults from two closely related species of great albatrosses: Amsterdam Diomedea amsterdamensis and wandering Diomedea exulans albatrosses which forage in different environmental conditions. We used 71 tracks of 71 juvenile birds and 141 of 116 incubating adults to compare both age categories. In order to explore the effect of moon light on night activity, we elaborated a new formula which improves the precision of the proxy of moon illumination. By day, we found that juveniles of both species reach some adult foraging capacities in less than two months. By night, albatrosses have reduced activity increasing during the first weeks at sea for juveniles and changing in accordance with moon illumination for both juveniles and adults. A peak of flight activity at dawn and dusk was apparent for both species. Interspecific comparison underlined that Amsterdam albatrosses were more active than wandering albatrosses, suggesting a difference in food and foraging strategy. Overall, we highlighted how life history traits, environmental conditions and time of the day affect the foraging activity of two related species of seabirds.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0908-8857 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3431
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Author Yang, M.; Hu, F.; Leng, X.; Chi, X.; Yin, D.; Ding, J.; Li, X.; Zuo, R.; Chang, Y.; Zhao, C.
Title Long-term effects of light spectra on fitness related behaviors and growth of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus intermedius Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Aquaculture Abbreviated Journal Aquaculture
Volume 537 Issue Pages 736518
Keywords Animals
Abstract The appropriate light spectrum for reseeding small sea urchins is crucial for stock enhancement. Here, we investigated righting, foraging behavior and growth of small sea urchins Strongylocentrotus intermedius exposed to five light spectra (blue light: 440–490 nm, green light: 510–550 nm, red light: 630–670 nm, yellow light: 570–600 nm and white light) for 60 days. In the present study, S. intermedius exposed to red light had a smaller test diameter than those exposed to other light spectra (P < 0.05). No significant difference of daily weight gain was found among light spectra groups (P > 0.05). Consistently, the lantern length and weight of S. intermedius under red light were smallest among five light spectra. These results indicate that red light significantly inhibits the growth of S. intermedius. The successful foraging proportion showed no significant difference among the five light spectra (P > 0.05). Righting response time and foraging time, however, were significantly higher in S. intermedius under blue light than those exposed to other light spectra (both P < 0.01). This highlights the importance and necessity of kelp beds and shelters at the reseeding site to avoid the long-term effects of blue light on foraging and righting behaviors.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0044-8486 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3430
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Author Martin, J.S.; Laberge, L.; Sasseville, A.; Berube, M.; Alain, S.; Lavoie, J.; Houle, J.; Hebert, M.
Title Timely use of in-car dim blue light and blue blockers in the morning does not improve circadian adaptation of fast rotating shift workers Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Human Health; Adaptation to shift and night work; blue blocker glasses; circadian misalignment; light exposure; melatonin; sleep; sleepiness/alertness
Abstract Circadian adaptation to night work usually does not occur in naturalistic conditions, largely due to exposure to low levels of light during the night and light in the morning on the way home. This leads to circadian misalignment, which has documented deleterious effects on sleep and functioning during waking hours. Chronic circadian misalignment is also being increasingly associated with long-term health comorbidities. As the circadian system is mostly sensitive to short wavelengths (i.e., blue light) and less sensitive to long wavelengths (i.e., red light), shaping light exposure in a “wavelength-wise” manner has been proposed to promote partial adaptation to night shifts, and, therefore, alleviate circadian rhythms disruption. This report presents results from two cross-over designed studies that aimed to investigate the effects of three different light conditions on circadian phase, sleepiness, and alertness of police patrol officers on a rotating shift schedule. The first study took place during summer (n = 15) and the second study (n = 25) during winter/early spring. In both studies, all participants went through three conditions composed of four consecutive night shifts: 1) in-car dim blue light exposure during the night shift and wearing of blue-blocking glasses (BBG) in the morning after 05:00 h; 2) in-car red light exposure during the night shift and wearing of BBG in the morning after 05:00 h; 3) a control condition with no intervention. To assess circadian phase position, salivary melatonin was collected hourly the night before and the night after each condition. Sleep was monitored by wrist actigraphy. Also, a 10-min Psychomotor Vigilance-Task was administered at the beginning and end of each night shift and the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale was completed every 2 h during each night shift. In the summer study, no difference was found in alertness and sleepiness between conditions. Participants though exhibited greater ( approximately 3 h) phase delay after four consecutive night shifts in the control condition (in which morning light exposure was expected to prevent phase delay) than after the blue and red conditions ( approximately 2 h) (in which wearing BBG were expected to promote phase delay). In the second study performed during the winter/early spring, a comparable approximately 2 h phase delay was found in each of the three conditions, with no difference in alertness and sleepiness between conditions. In conclusion, participants in both studies exhibited modest phase delay across the four night shifts, even during the control conditions. Still, re-entrainment was not fast enough to produce partial circadian adaptation after four night shifts. A greater number of consecutive night shifts may be necessary to produce enough circadian alignment to elicit benefits on sleepiness and alertness in workers driving a motorized vehicle during night shifts. In-car dim blue light exposure combined with the wearing of BBG in the morning did not show the expected benefits on circadian adaptation, sleepiness, and alertness in our studies. Higher levels of light may be warranted when implementing light intervention in a motorized vehicle setting.
Address Departement d'ophtalmologie et ORL-chirurgie Cervico-faciale, Universite Laval , Quebec, Quebec, Canada
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:33588653 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3429
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