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Author Ruan, Y.L.; Zou, Y.H.
Title Monitoring The Spatio-Temporal Trajectory Of Urban Area Hotspots In Wuhan, China Using Time-Series Nighttime Light Images Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication ISPRS – International Archives of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences Abbreviated Journal Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci.
Volume Xlii-4/W20 Issue Pages 71-76
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2194-9034 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2762
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Author Torres-Farfan, C.; Mendez, N.; Ehrefeld, P.; Seron-Ferre, M.
Title In utero circadian changes; facing light pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Current Opinion in Physiology Abbreviated Journal Current Opinion in Physiology
Volume 13 Issue Pages 128-134
Keywords Human Health; Review; In Utero; Pregnancy; Circadian Rhythm
Abstract Regardless of the molecular and physiological mechanisms involved, maternal fetal circadian systems interactions are recognized as crucial crosstalk for fetal development, and in turn, it may be a key factor determining fitting health in adulthood. However, in the last 100 years, life on the planet has altered the natural light-dark cycle by increasing light at night inducing disorganization of the circadian system, i.e. chronodisruption, including perturbation of the melatonin circadian rhythm by decreasing its nocturnal peak. The reduction in melatonin is associated with gradual losses in antioxidant protection, immunological and anti-inflammatory effects and as stated by WHO, the lack of nocturnal peak of melatonin is a deleterious signal that may induce chronic disease and cancer. Collectively the current review provides evidence about the role played by maternal circadian rhythms in fetal development and the impact of fetal-maternal desynchronization in the health and diseases of the offspring.
Address Laboratory of Developmental Chronobiology, Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia, Chile; claudia.torres(at)uach.cl
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsever Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2468-8673 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2761
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Author Moaraf, S.; Vistoropsky, Y.; Pozner, T.; Heiblum, R.; Okuliarova, M.; Zeman, M.; Barnea, A.
Title Artificial light at night affects brain plasticity and melatonin in birds Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Neuroscience Letters Abbreviated Journal Neurosci Lett
Volume in press Issue Pages 134639
Keywords Animals; Artificial Light At Night (ALAN); cell proliferation; circadian cycle; melatonin; neuronal densities; zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata)
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN), which disrupts the daily cycle of light, has vast biological impacts on all organisms, and is also associated with several health problems. The few existing studies on neuronal plasticity and cognitive functions in mammals indicate that a disruption of the circadian cycle impairs learning and memory and suppresses neurogenesis. However, nothing is known about the effect of ALAN on neuronal plasticity in birds. To this end, zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) were exposed to ecologically relevant ALAN intensities (0.5, 1.5 and 5 lux), treated with BrdU to quantify cell proliferation in their ventricular zone (VZ), and compared to controls that were kept under dark nights. We found, in our diurnal birds, that ALAN significantly increased cell proliferation in the VZ. However, neuronal densities in two brain regions decreased under ALAN, suggesting neuronal death. In addition, ALAN suppressed nocturnal melatonin production in a dose-dependent manner, and might also increase body mass. Taken together, our findings add to the notion of the deleterious effect of ALAN.
Address Department of Natural and Life Sciences, The Open University of Israel, Ra'anana, 43107, Israel
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0304-3940 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31760086 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2760
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Author Liu, M.; Li, W.; Zhang, B.; Hao, Q.; Xiaowei, G.; Yuchuan, L.
Title Research on the Influence of Weather Conditions on Urban Night Light Environment Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Sustainable Cities and Society Abbreviated Journal Sustainable Cities and Society
Volume 54 Issue Pages 101980
Keywords Skyglow; Weather; sky brightness; Urban
Abstract The increasingly serious urban light pollution has deepened the relevant research, and weather conditions indeed have great impact on the urban night light environment. Based on the SQM instrument, fish-eye camera and weather-related systems, this paper analyzes the changing law of night sky with time and weather. The brightness of the typical clear night sky changes regularly with time, and mainly includes five phases: rapid decline phase, slow decline phase, unstable decline phase, smooth phase, and rapid increase phase of sky brightness. In two phases of the smooth sky brightness, the average sky brightness in the high and low brightness phase respectively is 18.123 mag/arcsecond2 and 18.82 mag/arcsecond2, and about 15 times and 8 times higher than those of the natural night sky. This paper establishes the regression model of typical clear night sky brightness in rapid decline phase and rapid increase phase of sky brightness. The sky magnitude brightness in rainy weather is much lower than that in clear weather, the difference is about 3 mag/arcsecond2, the brightness can be reach 15.63 mag / arcsecond2; the average magnitude brightness in snowy days is about 0.17 mag/arcsecond2 higher than that in cloudy weather. There is a significant correlation among the air quality index, the ground illumination ratio of moon, the atmospheric visibility and the sky brightness. The deepened air pollution can also intensify light pollution, which can increase to 3 and 10 times higher than the night sky brightness under the moderate and severe air pollution. The lunar cycle has the least impact on light pollution in clear days, the sky brightness with the full moon is about 2 and 3 times higher than that without the moon.
Address Corresponding author at: No.2, Ling Gong Road, Gan Jing Zi District, School of Architecture and Fine Art, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, Liao Ning Province 116024, China; iumingyitj(at)163.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2210-6707 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2759
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Author Secondi, J.; Davranche, A.; Théry, M.; Mondy, N.; Lengagne, T.; Isaac, N.
Title Assessing the effects of artificial light at night on biodiversity across latitude – Current knowledge gaps Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Global Ecology and Biogeography Abbreviated Journal Global Ecol Biogeogr
Volume in press Issue Pages geb.13037
Keywords Ecology; biodiversity; Review
Abstract Aim

Exposure to artificial light at night (ALAN) is a risk factor for organisms. Considering the spread and increasing intensity of night brightness across the globe, and the key role of light at all biological levels, alterations of ecosystems are expected. Yet, we cannot predict the severity of the effects of ALAN in several biomes because little information is available outside the temperate zone. We reviewed current knowledge and identified traits that could be targeted to fill this knowledge gap in order to contribute to the elaboration of a biogeographical framework for the study of ALAN at the global scale.

Location

Global.

Time period

Current and next decades.

Methods

We analysed the latitudinal variation in ALAN and focused on environmental factors that vary with latitude but that have been overlooked. We reviewed biological traits that exhibit latitudinal variation and depend on light and photoperiod and compiled information about the predicted changes in human demography and road networks across different world regions.

Results

Cloud cover amplifies ALAN far away from urbanized areas. Because of the higher frequency of overcast sky nights, exposure effects may be stronger both at high latitudes and across a large fraction of the intertropical zone, although at different times of the year. Intertropical biomes host the largest fraction of global biodiversity. Although currently they are not the most exposed to ALAN, their human populations are growing, and urbanized areas and road networks are expanding. Hence, ALAN could have strong ecological consequences, with cloud cover as an aggravating factor.

Perspectives

Knowledge gaps currently limit our ability to predict the effects of ALAN in different biomes. Therefore, it will be important to start investigating the consequences of this novel environmental factor across the globe, in order to develop a relevant theoretical framework.
Address
Corporate Author Wiley Thesis
Publisher English Place of Publication English Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1466-822X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2758
Permanent link to this record