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Author Gubin, D.; Weinert, D.; Solovieva, S.V.; Durov, A.M.; Litvinova, N.S.; Danilova, L.A.; Prokopiev, N.Y.; Trushnikov, D.Y.; Kartashova, E.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Melatonin attenuates light-at-night effects on systolic blood pressure and body temperature but does not affect diastolic blood pressure and heart rate circadian rhythms Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Biological Rhythm Research Abbreviated Journal Biological Rhythm Research  
  Volume 51 Issue 5 Pages 780-793  
  Keywords Human Health; Melatonin; circadian rhythms; body temperature; blood pressure; heart rate; constant routine; ambient light; light at night; young adults; sex; gender  
  Abstract Aim of the present study is to assess whether 1.5mg of exogenous melatonin provided under modified CR in constant light (~400 lx) is capable to mimic effects of dark phase. Forty-six young adults (YA), 17–24 years old of both genders were studied under amodified CR protocol for 26 h. Initially, participants were investigated under constant light (CR-LL) and 2 weeks later under the same conditions though 1.5mg melatonin (Melaxen) was given orally at 22:30. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), heart rate (HR) and body temperature (BT) were measured every 2 h. To verify the effect of constant light, formerly published results obtained under light-dark conditions (CR-LD) were reanalyzed.

Administration of 1.5 mg of exogenous melatonin modified the 24 h patterns of BT and SBP within short 3.5 h time window but did not influence DBP and HR. A short-term reduction of SBP and BT for 1.5–3.5 hours was observed. The values in the CR-LL+M group were significantly lower than in CR-LL at 2:00 h. Hence, exogenous melatonin did mimic the scotophase. Though this effect was gender-specific and found only in female YA.

Results of this study prompt further research to qualify and quantify dosage-, duration- and time-dependent differences of melatonin effects, to discern between short-term (acute) and long-term (chronic) melatonin administration, and to clarify its underlying mechanisms.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Taylor & Francis Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0929-1016 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 3388  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Panagiotou, M.; Deboer, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Chronic Dim-light-at-night Exposure on Sleep in Young and Aged Mice Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Neuroscience  
  Volume 426 Issue Pages 154-167  
  Keywords Aging; Animals; Behavior, Animal/physiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; *Light; Male; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Motor Activity/physiology; Photoperiod; Sleep/*physiology; Sleep Deprivation/physiopathology; Wakefulness/*physiology; *aging; *dim-light-at-night (DLAN); *electroencephalogram; *sleep; *sleep deprivation; *slow-wave-activity  
  Abstract Dim-light-at-night (DLAN) exposure is associated with health problems, such as metabolic disruptions, immunological modulations, oxidative stress, sleep problems, and altered circadian timing. Neurophysiological parameters, including sleep patterns, are altered in the course of aging in a similar way. Here, we investigated the effect of chronic (three months) DLAN exposure (12L:12Dim-light, 75:5lux) on sleep and the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG), and rest-activity behavior in young (6-month-old, n=9) and aged (18- n=8, 24-month-old, n=6) C57BL/6J mice and compared with age-matched controls (n=11, n=9 and n=8, respectively). We recorded the EEG and electromyogram continuously for 48-h and conducted a 6-h sleep-deprivation. A delay in the phase angle of entrainment of locomotor activity and daily vigilance state rhythms was apparent in mice following DLAN exposure, throughout the whole age spectrum, rendering sleep characteristics similar among the three age DLAN groups and significantly different from the age-matched controls. Notably, slow-wave-activity in NREM sleep (SWA, EEG power density in 0.5-4.0Hz) was differentially altered in young and aged DLAN mice. Particularly, SWA increased as a function of age, which was further accentuated following DLAN exposure. However, this was not found in the young DLAN animals, which were characterized by the lowest SWA levels. Concluding, long-term DLAN exposure induced more pronounced alterations in the sleep architecture of young mice, towards an aging phenotype, while it enhanced age-associated sleep changes in the older groups. Our data suggest that irrespective of age, chronic DLAN exposure deteriorates sleep behavior and may consequently impact general health.  
  Address Laboratory for Neurophysiology, Department of Cell and Chemical Biology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands. t.de_boer ( at ) lumc.nl  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0306-4522 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31846754 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 3387  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Aulsebrook, A.E.; Lesku, J.A.; Mulder, R.A.; Goymann, W.; Vyssotski, A.L.; Jones, T.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Streetlights Disrupt Night-Time Sleep in Urban Black Swans Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution Abbreviated Journal Front. Ecol. Evol.  
  Volume 8 Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals; accelerometry; artificial light at night; blue light; EEG; elecrophysiology; light pollution, light spectra; black swan; Cygnus atratus  
  Abstract Artificial light at night could have widespread and detrimental impacts on sleep. To reduce disruptive effects of artificial light on sleep in humans, most smartphones and computers now have software that reduces blue light emissions at night. Little is known about whether reducing blue light emissions from city lights could also benefit urban wildlife. We investigated the effects of blue-rich (white) and blue-reduced (amber) LED streetlights on accelerometry-defined rest, electrophysiologically-identified sleep, and plasma melatonin in a diurnal bird, the black swan (Cygnus atratus). Urban swans were exposed to 20 full nights of each lighting type in an outdoor, naturalistic environment. Contrary to our predictions, we found that night-time rest was similar during exposure to amber and white lights but decreased under amber lights compared with dark conditions. By recording brain activity in a subset of swans, we also demonstrated that resting birds were almost always asleep, so amber light also reduced sleep at night. We found no effect of light treatment on total (24 h) daily rest or plasma melatonin. Our study provides the first electrophysiologically-verified evidence for effects of streetlights on sleep in an urban animal, and furthermore suggests that reducing blue wavelengths of light might not mitigate these effects.  
  Address School of BioSciences, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; aulsebrooka ( at ) gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Frontiers Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2296-701X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 3386  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Namgyal, D.; Chandan, K.; Sultan, A.; Aftab, M.; Ali, S.; Mehta, R.; El-Serehy, H.A.; Al-Misned, F.A.; Sarwat, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dim Light at Night Induced Neurodegeneration and Ameliorative Effect of Curcumin Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Cells Abbreviated Journal Cells  
  Volume 9 Issue 9 Pages  
  Keywords Human health; *brain-derived neurotrophic factor; *curcumin; *diurnal rhythm; *lipid peroxidation; *microRNA; *neurodegeneration; *neurogenesis; *neuroprotection; *oxidative stress  
  Abstract It is a well-known fact that following a proper routine light/dark or diurnal rhythm controls almost all biological processes. With the introduction of modern lighting and artificial illumination systems, continuous exposure to light at night may lead to the disruption of diurnal rhythm. However, the effect of light during the night on brain anatomy, physiology, and human body functions is less explored and poorly understood. In this study, we have evaluated the effect of exposure to dim light (5 lux) at night (dLAN) on Swiss Albino mice over a duration of three consecutive weeks. Results have revealed that exposure to dLAN led to an impairment of cognitive and non-cognitive behaviour, oxidative stress-mediated elevation of lipid peroxidation, and reduction of superoxide dismutase and catalase activity. It also led to the downregulation of hippocampal proteins (BDNF, Synapsin II and DCX) at both protein and mRNA level. Additionally, there was downregulation of CREB and SIRT1 mRNAs and neurodegeneration-associated miRNA21a-5p and miRNA34a-5p. The pyramidal and cortical neurons started showing pyknotic and chromatolysis characteristics. However, a dose of curcumin administered to the mice positively modulated these parameters in our experimental animals. We proposed the modulatory role of curcumin in addressing the deleterious effects of dLAN.  
  Address Amity Institute of Pharmacy, Amity University, Noida UP 201303, India; dhonamdhonam ( at ) gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher MDPI Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2073-4409 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32933226; PMCID:PMC7565558 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 3385  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wu, Y.; Gui, S.-Y.; Fang, Y.; Zhang, M.; Hu, C.-Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Exposure to outdoor light at night and risk of breast cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987) Abbreviated Journal Environ Pollut  
  Volume 269 Issue Pages 116114  
  Keywords Human health; *Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology; Case-Control Studies; Cohort Studies; Female; Humans; *Light/adverse effects; Prospective Studies; Breast cancer; Light at night; Meta-analysis; Systematic review  
  Abstract Recent epidemiological studies have explored effects of light at night (LAN) exposure on breast cancer, but reported inconsistent findings. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of available evidence regarding the association of LAN assessed by satellite data with breast cancer. We conducted a systematic PubMed, Web of Science, and EMBASE database literature search until August 2020. Random-effects meta-analysis was applied to synthesis risk estimates. Heterogeneity was measured using statistics of Cochran's Q, I(2), and Tau(2) (tau(2)). We assessed publication bias through funnel plot and Egger's test. Moreover, subgroup analyses according to study design and menopausal status were performed. Risk of bias (RoB) of each included study was assessed using a domain-based RoB assessment tool. The confidence in the body of evidence was appraised using the GRADE approach for level-of-evidence translation. A total of 1157 studies were identified referring to LAN and breast cancer, from which 6 were included for quantitative synthesis. We found a significantly higher odds of breast cancer in the highest versus the lowest category of LAN exposure (OR = 1.11, 95% CI: 1.06, 1.16; I(2) = 0.0%). In the subgroup analyses stratified by menopausal status and study design, significant association was found in postmenopausal women (OR = 1.07, 95% CI = 1.00, 1.13) and cohort studies (OR = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.05, 1.18), while the summary estimates of premenopausal women and case-control studies showed no significance. The level of evidence for the association of LAN exposure and breast cancer risk was graded as “moderate” with “probably low” RoB according to the NTP/OHAT framework. In conclusion, this study suggests a link of LAN exposure with risk of breast cancer. Further high-quality prospective studies, especially performed in low-to middle-income countries with improvement in the area of LAN exposure assessment are needed to advance this field.  
  Address Department of Humanistic Medicine, School of Humanistic Medicine, Anhui Medical University, 81 Meishan Road, Hefei 230032, China; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Anhui Medical University, 81 Meishan Road, Hefei 230032, China. Electronic address: cy.hu@ahmu.edu.cn  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:33280921 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 3384  
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