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Author Levin, N.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Zhang, Q.
Title Remote Sensing of Night Lights—Beyond DMSP Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 11 Issue 12 Pages 1472
Keywords Remote Sensing; Commentary
Abstract Remote sensing of night lights differs from other sources of remote sensing in its ability to directly observe human activity from space as well as in informing us on a new type of anthropogenic threat, that of light pollution. This special issue focuses on studies which used newer sensors than the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program – Operational Line-Scan System (DMSP/OLS). Most of the analyses focused on data from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) nighttime sensor (also called the Day/Night Band, or VIIRS/DNB in short), for which the first instrument in the series was launched in 2011. In this editorial, we provide an overview of the 12 papers published in this special issue, and offer suggestions for future research directions in this field, both with respect to the remote sensing platforms and algorithms, and with respect to the development of new applications.
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2575
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Author Kim, K.-N.; Huang, Q.-Y.; Lei, C.-L.
Title Advances in insect phototaxis and application to pest management: A review Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Pest Management Science Abbreviated Journal Pest Manag Sci
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Review; Animals
Abstract Many insects, especially nocturnal insects, exhibit positive phototaxis to artificial lights. Many light traps are currently used to monitor and manage insect pest populations, with light traps playing a crucial role in physical pest control. Efficient use of light traps to attract target insect pests becomes an important topic in application of integrated pest management (IPM). Phototactic responses of insects vary among species, light characteristics and the physiological status of the insects. In addition, light can cause several biological responses, including biochemical, physiological, molecular and fitness changes in insects. In this review, we discuss several hypotheses on insect phototaxis, affecting factors on insect phototaxis, insect sensitive wavelengths, biological responses of insects to light and countermeasures for conserving beneficial insects and increasing trapping effect. Additionally, we provide information on the different sensitivities to wavelengths causing positive phototactic behavior on more than 70 insect pest and beneficial insect species. The use of advanced light traps equipped with superior light sources, such as light emitting diodes (LEDs), will make physical pest control in IPM more efficient. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Address Hubei Insect Resources Utilization and Sustainable Pest Management Key Laboratory, College of Plant Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, Hubei 430070, China
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1526-498X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31251458 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2574
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Author Chen, Q.; Ru, T.; Zhai, D.; Huang, X.; Li, Y.; Qian, L.; Wang, Y.; Zhou, G.
Title Half a century of Lighting Research & Technology: A bibliometric review Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research & Technology
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Review; History; Lighting
Abstract Lighting Research & Technology (LRT) is an influential journal in the field of light and lighting dating back to 1969. To celebrate its 50th birthday, the current study explored its bibliometric characteristics and mapped the bibliographic information graphically through VOSviewer software. This analysis found that the number of papers has steadily increased during recent years. The most productive and cited country was the United Kingdom. The most productive and cited institution was Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. The most prolific author was Steve Fotios and the most cited author was Mark Rea. The journal most cited together with LRT was Leukos. LRT has become more and more international and interdisciplinary over the last five decades. Suggestions for the development of LRT are provided. Develpoments over the last 50 years have turned LRT into one of leading journals in the light and lighting field, one which has a bright future.
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2573
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Author Russo, D.; Cosentino, F.; Festa, F.; De Benedetta, F.; Pejic, B.; Cerretti, P.; Ancillotto, L.
Title Artificial illumination near rivers may alter bat-insect trophic interactions Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987) Abbreviated Journal Environ Pollut
Volume 252 Issue Pt B Pages 1671-1677
Keywords Animals
Abstract Artificial illumination at night represents an increasingly concerning threat to ecosystems worldwide, altering persistence, behaviour, physiology and fitness of many organisms and their mutual interactions, in the long-term affecting ecosystem functioning. Bats are very sensitive to artificial light at night because they are obligate nocturnal and feed on insects which are often also responsive to lights. Here we tested the effects of LED lighting on prey-predator interactions at riverine ecosystems, using bats and their insect prey as models, and compared bat and insect reactions in terms of bat activity and prey insect abundance and diversity, respectively, on artificially lit vs. unlit nights. Artificial light influenced both insect and bat assemblages in taxon-specific directions: insect abundances increased at lit sites, particularly due to an increase in small dipterans near the light source. Composition of insect assemblages also differed significantly between lit and unlit sites. Total bat activity declined at lit sites, but this change was mainly due to the response of the most abundant species, Myotis daubentonii, while opportunistic species showed no reaction or even an opposite pattern (Pipistrellus kuhlii). We show that artificial lighting along rivers may affect trophic interactions between bats and insects, resulting in a profound alteration of community structure and dynamics.
Address Wildlife Research Unit, Dipartimento di Agraria, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, via Universita, 100, 80055, Portici, Italy
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31284209 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2572
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Author C-Sanchez, E.; Sanchez-Medina, A.J.; Alonso-Hernandez, J.B.; Voltes-Dorta, A.
Title Astrotourism and Night Sky Brightness Forecast: First Probabilistic Model Approach Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Sensors (Basel, Switzerland) Abbreviated Journal Sensors (Basel)
Volume 19 Issue 13 Pages
Keywords Skyglow; Society
Abstract Celestial tourism, also known as astrotourism, astronomical tourism or, less frequently, star tourism, refers to people's interest in visiting places where celestial phenomena can be clearly observed. Stars, skygazing, meteor showers or comets, among other phenomena, arouse people's interest, however, good night sky conditions are required to observe such phenomena. From an environmental point of view, several organisations have surfaced in defence of the protection of dark night skies against light pollution, while from an economic point of view; the idea also opens new possibilities for development in associated areas. The quality of dark skies for celestial tourism can be measured by night sky brightness (NSB), which is used to quantify the visual perception of the sky, including several light sources at a specific point on earth. The aim of this research is to model the nocturnal sky brightness by training and testing a probabilistic model using real NSB data. ARIMA and artificial neural network models have been applied to open NSB data provided by the Globe at Night international programme, with the results of this first model approach being promising and opening up new possibilities for astrotourism. To the best of the authors' knowledge, probabilistic models have not been applied to NSB forecasting.
Address Management Science and Business Economics Group, University of Edinburgh Business School, Edinburgh EH8 9JS, UK
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1424-8220 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31247919 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2571
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