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Author Chronopoulos, D.K.; Kampanelis, S.; Oto-Peralías, D.; Wilson, J.O.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Ancient colonialism and the economic geography of the Mediterranean Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of Economic Geography Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract This article investigates the legacy of ancient Phoenician, Greek and Etruscan colonialism in shaping the economic geography of the Mediterranean region. Utilising historical data on ancient colonies and current data on population density and night light emissions (as a proxy for economic activity), we find that geographical areas colonised by these ancient civilisations have higher population density and economic activity in the present day. We also find that ancient colonialism affected the origin and evolution of the urban system of cities and settlements prevalent in the Mediterranean region.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1468-2702 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3253  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lin, P.; Yang, L.; Zhao, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Urbanization effects on Chinese mammal and amphibian richness: a multi-scale study using the urban-rural gradient approach Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Environmental Research Communications Abbreviated Journal Environ. Res. Commun.  
  Volume 2 Issue 12 Pages 125002  
  Keywords Animals; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract The scale and extent of global urbanization are unprecedented and increasing. As urbanization generally encroaches on natural habitats and the urban ecological footprint reaches far beyond the city limits, how urbanization affects biodiversity has received increasing attention from the scientific community. Nonetheless, the comprehensive syntheses of urbanization consequences for biodiversity, including diverse taxonomic groups, across multiple spatial scales and spanning a wide gradient range of urbanization intensity are still insufficient. Here, based on the urban-rural gradient approach, we assessed the effects of urbanization on Chinese mammal and amphibian richness across the entire urbanization gradient (i.e., urbanization level from 0 to 1) at the national, regional and urban agglomeration scales. We used the global mammal and amphibian distribution data along with corresponding background climate, habitat conditions and socioeconomic activities data for analysis. Our results revealed a detailed and diverse pattern of Chinese mammal and amphibian richness along the entire spectrum of urbanization gradient across three spatial scales. And an approximately monotonic decrease only existed in certain urban agglomerations. The imprint of urbanization on mammal and amphibian richness were largely masked by the overall primacy of background climate at the national and regional scales. As the scale of analysis shifting from the country to urban agglomerations, urbanization-associated variables and locally specific limiting factors started to play important roles in driving the richness patterns. Moreover, the environmental Kuznets curve hypothesis can explain the relationship between biodiversity pressure and urbanization activities in certain Chinese urban agglomerations. However, the findings of urbanization effects on biodiversity using the urban-rural gradient analysis should be interpreted with caution because many possible driving forces simultaneously present along the urban-rural gradient and are very challenging to attribute.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2515-7620 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3252  
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Author Hussein, A.A.A.; Bloem, E.; Fodor, I.; Baz, E.-S.; Tadros, M.M.; Soliman, M.F.M.; El-Shenawy, N.S.; Koene, J.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Slowly seeing the light: an integrative review on ecological light pollution as a potential threat for mollusks Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Environmental Science and Pollution Research International Abbreviated Journal Environ Sci Pollut Res Int  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals; Artificial light; Biorhythm; Mollusca; Reproduction; Slugs; Snails; Zeitgeber  
  Abstract Seasonal changes in the natural light condition play a pivotal role in the regulation of many biological processes in organisms. Disruption of this natural condition via the growing loss of darkness as a result of anthropogenic light pollution has been linked to species-wide shifts in behavioral and physiological traits. This review starts with a brief overview of the definition of light pollution and the most recent insights into the perception of light. We then go on to review the evidence for some adverse effects of ecological light pollution on different groups of animals and will focus on mollusks. Taken together, the available evidence suggests a critical role for light pollution as a recent, growing threat to the regulation of various biological processes in these animals, with the potential to disrupt ecosystem stability. The latter indicates that ecological light pollution is an environmental threat that needs to be taken seriously and requires further research attention.  
  Address Department of Ecological Science, Faculty of Science, Vrije University, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081, Amsterdam, Netherlands  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0944-1344 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:33341922 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3251  
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Author Straka III, W.; Kondragunta, S.; Wei, Z.; Zhang, H.; Miller, S.D.; Watts, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Examining the Economic and Environmental Impacts of COVID-19 Using Earth Observation Data Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing  
  Volume 13 Issue 1 Pages 5  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; COVID-19  
  Abstract The COVID-19 pandemic has infected almost 73 million people and is responsible for over 1.63 million fatalities worldwide since early December 2019, when it was first reported in Wuhan, China. In the early stages of the pandemic, social distancing measures, such as lockdown restrictions, were applied in a non-uniform way across the world to reduce the spread of the virus. While such restrictions contributed to flattening the curve in places like Italy, Germany, and South Korea, it plunged the economy in the United States to a level of recession not seen since WWII, while also improving air quality due to the reduced mobility. Using daily Earth observation data (Day/Night Band (DNB) from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Suomi-NPP and NO2 measurements from the TROPOspheric Monitoring Instrument TROPOMI) along with monthly averaged cell phone derived mobility data, we examined the economic and environmental impacts of lockdowns in Los Angeles, California; Chicago, Illinois; Washington DC from February to April 2020—encompassing the most profound shutdown measures taken in the U.S. The preliminary analysis revealed that the reduction in mobility involved two major observable impacts: (i) improved air quality (a reduction in NO2 and PM2.5 concentration), but (ii) reduced economic activity (a decrease in energy consumption as measured by the radiance from the DNB data) that impacted on gross domestic product, poverty levels, and the unemployment rate. With the continuing rise of COVID-19 cases and declining economic conditions, such knowledge can be combined with unemployment and demographic data to develop policies and strategies for the safe reopening of the economy while preserving our environment and protecting vulnerable populations susceptible to COVID-19 infection.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3250  
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Author Shima, J.S.; Osenberg, C.W.; Noonburg, E.G.; Alonzo, S.H.; Swearer, S.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Lunar rhythms in growth of larval fish Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Proceedings. Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proc Biol Sci  
  Volume 288 Issue 1942 Pages 20202609  
  Keywords Moonlight; Animals; developmental history; larval growth; lunar periodicity; reef fish; trophic connectivity  
  Abstract Growth and survival of larval fishes is highly variable and unpredictable. Our limited understanding of this variation constrains our ability to forecast population dynamics and effectively manage fisheries. Here we show that daily growth rates of a coral reef fish (the sixbar wrasse, Thalassoma hardwicke) are strongly lunar-periodic and predicted by the timing of nocturnal brightness: growth was maximized when the first half of the night was dark and the second half of the night was bright. Cloud cover that obscured moonlight facilitated a 'natural experiment', and confirmed the effect of moonlight on growth. We suggest that lunar-periodic growth may be attributable to light-mediated suppression of diel vertical migrations of predators and prey. Accounting for such effects will improve our capacity to predict the future dynamics of marine populations, especially in response to climate-driven changes in nocturnal cloud cover and intensification of artificial light, which could lead to population declines by reducing larval survival and growth.  
  Address School of BioSciences, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:33434460 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3249  
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