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Author Stefani, O.; Freyburger, M.; Veitz, S.; Basishvili, T.; Meyer, M.; Weibel, J.; Kobayashi, K.; Shirakawa, Y.; Cajochen, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Changing color and intensity of LED lighting across the day impacts on circadian melatonin rhythms and sleep in healthy men Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of Pineal Research Abbreviated Journal J Pineal Res  
  Volume in press Issue Pages e12714  
  Keywords Human health; Lighting; cognition; humans; male; melatonin; non-visual effects of light; sleep; wakefulness  
  Abstract We examined whether dynamically changing light across a scheduled 16-h waking day influences sleepiness, cognitive performance, visual comfort, melatonin secretion, and sleep under controlled laboratory conditions in healthy men. Fourteen participants underwent a 49-h laboratory protocol in a repeated-measures study design. They spent the first 5-h in the evening under standard lighting, followed by an 8-h nocturnal sleep episode at habitual bedtimes. Thereafter, volunteers either woke up to static light or to a dynamic light that changed spectrum and intensity across the scheduled 16-h waking day. Following an 8-h nocturnal sleep episode, the volunteers spent another 11-h either under static or dynamic light. Static light attenuated the evening rise in melatonin levels more compared to dynamic light as indexed by a significant reduction in the melatonin AUC prior to bedtime during static light only. Participants felt less vigilant in the evening during dynamic light. After dynamic light, sleep latency was significantly shorter in both the baseline and treatment night while sleep structure, sleep quality, cognitive performance and visual comfort did not significantly differ. The study shows that dynamic changes in spectrum and intensity of light promote melatonin secretion and sleep initiation in healthy men.  
  Address Transfaculty Research Platform Molecular and Cognitive Neurosciences (MCN), University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-3098 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:33378563 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3219  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Li, C.; Yang, W.; Tang, Q.; Tang, X.; Lei, J.; Wu, M.; Qiu, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Detection of Multidimensional Poverty Using Luojia 1-01 Nighttime Light Imagery Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of the Indian Society of Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal J Indian Soc Remote Sens  
  Volume 48 Issue 7 Pages 963-977  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Poverty is a complex social problem, and accurate poverty identification is a key step for creating strategies to eliminate poverty. The Luojia 1-01 satellite is part of a new generation of professional nighttime light remote sensing that was successfully launched on July 2, 2018, and has provided 130-m high-resolution nighttime light images for poverty studies. This study aimed to detect the accuracy of multidimensional poverty evaluation using Luojia 1-01 data at the county level. Drawing on a sustainable livelihood framework, the spatial patterns of multidimensional poverty were identified across Hubei province. The results found that there was a good correlation between the nighttime light index and the sustainable livelihoods index, and a second-order linear model had the best goodness of fit with a coefficient of determination of 0.88 and root mean square error of 0.03, indicating a good model performance. Counties affected by multidimensional poverty were mainly distributed in the west, northeast, and southeast of Hubei, and the agreement between the model results and counties identified by the government as impoverished was 73.08%. Due to its high-resolution and rich spatial information, Luojia 1-01 data can be used to efficiently and accurately identify the scale of multidimensional poverty at the county level and provide the relevant government departments with a scientific basis for implementing responsible and holistic poverty alleviation policies.  
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  ISSN 0255-660X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial (down) 3218  
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Author Zhai, W.; Han, B.; Cheng, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evaluation of Luojia 1–01 Nighttime Light Imagery for Built-Up Urban Area Extraction: A Case Study of 16 Cities in China Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters Abbreviated Journal IEEE Geosci. Remote Sensing Lett.  
  Volume 17 Issue 10 Pages 1802-1806  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract On June 2, 2018, the Luojia 1-01 (LJ1-01) nighttime light satellite was launched from China with a spatial resolution of 130 m at nadir, which is a significant improvement over the resolutions of previous nighttime light satellites. However, few studies have focused on the applications of LJ1-01 imagery. This letter aimed to evaluate the potential of utilizing LJ1-01 data to extract built-up urban areas in comparison with Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) day-night band (DNB) data by conducting a case study of 16 cities involved in the Belt and Road Initiative in China. The built-up urban areas of the 16 cities were extracted by thresholding segmentation in reference to administrative statistical data, and 30-m-resolution artificial impervious data were adopted as the benchmark (ground truth). Qualitative and quantitative assessments were implemented for an evaluation, revealing that the built-up urban areas extracted by LJ1-01 data outperformed the areas extracted by VIIRS DNB data. We argue that these improvements originate from the superior spatial resolution and image quality of LJ1-01 over its predecessors. The LJ1-01 data presented excellent suitability for the extraction of built-up urban areas at the city scale, and hence, these data may be further applied to other related investigations.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1545-598X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial (down) 3217  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Blundell, E.; Schaffer, V.; Moyle, B.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dark sky tourism and the sustainability of regional tourism destinations Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Tourism Recreation Research Abbreviated Journal Tourism Recreation Research  
  Volume 45 Issue 4 Pages 549-556  
  Keywords Skyglow; Dark sky tourism  
  Abstract Destinations across the globe face severe and potentially irreversible consequences from tourism growth and development. Contemporary approaches such as reducing access or site closures have been identified to increase demand, potentially exacerbating negative impacts. Despite acknowledgement of the impacts of tourism, limited studies have considered the ‘night sky’ as a tourism destination, nor the implications for regional sustainability. Consequently, the aim of this research is to explore the intersection between Dark sky tourism (DST) and sustainability within regional tourism. Semi-structured interviews were conducted in the Murweh Shire, in outback Australia. The analysis revealed sustainability, ethics and education as critical to achieving sustainable DST in a regional setting. A core contribution of this research is a conceptual model for sustainable DST. Future research is required to further explore ethics as a critical, yet often neglected, component of sustainable tourism.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0250-8281 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial (down) 3216  
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Author Schinkelshoek M. S.; van Luxemburg R. P.; Bes A. L.; Ottens T. H.; Fronczek R.; Lammers G. J.; van Westerloo D. J. url  openurl
  Title Good night and good luck: sleep in the ICU Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Netherlands Journal of Critical Care Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 28 Issue 1 Pages 13 - 17  
  Keywords Human Health; Review  
  Abstract Sleep in the ICU is poor and improving sleep proves to be challenging. However, clinical trials on the use of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions to improve sleep in the ICU are scarce. The few clinical trials that have been performed are hampered by difficulty in obtaining reliable objective sleep measurements in the ICU environment. Therefore, firm evidence on the effect of all commonly used interventions is limited. Strategies to decrease noise and light exposure seem promising, since pilot studies and small clinical trials suggest that implementation is feasible and most interventions are low-cost. Standardisation of sleep-promoting protocols might lead to a possibility of performing multicentre trials that can provide much needed evidence on the efficacy of non-pharmacological interventions to improve sleep in the ICU. Although many different medications are used to improve sleep in the ICU, there is insufficient evidence in the literature to support the use of any of them to effectively improve sleep. The use of benzodiazepines is not recommended based on the lack of evidence for their efficacy and the association with increased risk of delirium. Emphasis on non-pharmacological sleep-promoting measures before prescribing medication is warranted, as it is currently not clear to what extent prescribing sleep-promoting medications is actually beneficial to ICU patients. Clinical trials on existing pharmacological options and expanding treatment options by considering sodium oxybate or suvorexant are logical future directions to improve the treatment of sleep problems in the ICU.  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial (down) 3215  
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