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Author Herdiwijaya, D.; Satyaningsih, R.; Luthfiandari,; Prastyo, H.A.; Arumaningtyas, E.P.; Sulaeman, M.; Setiawan, A.; Yulianti, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Measurements of sky brightness at Bosscha Observatory, Indonesia Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Heliyon Abbreviated Journal Heliyon  
  Volume 6 Issue 8 Pages e04635  
  Keywords Skyglow  
  Abstract To determine the level of light pollution due to human activities, we performed sky-brightness measurements at Bosscha Observatory, Indonesia (107°36′E; 6°49′S, 1300 m above sea level) for seven years from 2011 to 2018, using a portable photometer pointed at the zenith. From 1692 nightly records, we found that the average brightness on moonless nights reached the 19.70 ± 0.84 and 19.01 ± 0.88 astronomical magnitudes per square arcsecond (mpass), with median values of 19.73 mpass and 19.03 mpass for the AM and PM periods, respectively. The darkest skies occurred in the peak of the summer season during the month of July, which corresponds to the lowest annual temperature, precipitation, and relative humidity. The internal temperature of our Sky Quality Meter is adequately stable, and our results correlate well with other measurements. The sky brightness depends on the age of the Moon (days past new Moon) and on seasonal monthly variations, but it is not related to the lunar distance. The night-SB quality can be modified by the coupled climate system as a diurnal cycle to an 11-year solar cycle. The cities around the Observatory, Bandung and Lembang, clearly make strong contributions to light pollution in the area due to unshielded light sources.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2405-8440 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3093  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Maksimainen, M.; Vaaja, M.T.; Kurkela, M.; Virtanen, J.-P.; Julin, A.; Jaalama, K.; Hyyppä, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Nighttime Mobile Laser Scanning and 3D Luminance Measurement: Verifying the Outcome of Roadside Tree Pruning with Mobile Measurement of the Road Environment Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information Abbreviated Journal Ijgi  
  Volume 9 Issue 7 Pages 455  
  Keywords Lighting; Plants; Instrumentation  
  Abstract Roadside vegetation can affect the performance of installed road lighting. We demonstrate a workflow in which a car-mounted measurement system is used to assess the light-obstructing effect of roadside vegetation. The mobile mapping system (MMS) includes a panoramic camera system, laser scanner, inertial measurement unit, and satellite positioning system. The workflow and the measurement system were applied to a road section of Munkkiniemenranta, Helsinki, Finland, in 2015 and 2019. The relative luminance distribution on a road surface and the obstructing vegetation were measured before and after roadside vegetation pruning applying a luminance-calibrated mobile mapping system. The difference between the two measurements is presented, and the opportunities provided by the mobile 3D luminance measurement system are discussed.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2220-9964 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3092  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Touitou, Y.; Point, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects and mechanisms of action of light-emitting diodes on the human retina and internal clock Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Environmental Research Abbreviated Journal Environ Res  
  Volume 190 Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Review; Human Health; Biological clock; Blue light; Electronic media; Endocrine disruptor; Environmental synchronizers; Light at night; Melatonin; Night work; Retinal phototoxicity; Shift work; Sleep disorder  
  Abstract White light-emitting diodes (LEDs) will likely become the most used lighting devices worldwide in the future because of their very low prices over the course of their long lifespans which can be up to several tens of thousands of hours. The expansion of LED use in both urban and domestic lighting has prompted questions regarding their possible health effects, because the light that they provide is potentially high in the harmful blue band (400-500nm) of the visible light spectrum. Research on the potential effects of LEDs and their blue band on human health has followed three main directions: 1) examining their retinal phototoxicity; 2) examining disruption of the internal clock, i.e., an out-of-sync clock, in shift workers and night workers, including the accompanying health issues, most concerningly an increased relative risk of cancer; and 3) examining risky, inappropriate late-night use of smartphones and consoles among children and adolescents. Here, we document the recognized or potential health issues associated with LED lighting together with their underlying mechanisms of action. There is so far no evidence that LED lighting is deleterious to human retina under normal use. However, exposure to artificial light at night is a new source of pollution because it affects the circadian clock. Blue-rich light, including cold white LEDs, should be considered a new endocrine disruptor, because it affects estrogen secretion and has unhealthful consequences in women, as demonstrated to occur via a complex mechanism.  
  Address Cooper Securite SAS, 63200, Riom, France  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0013-9351 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32758719 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3091  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Shimomura, M.; Yoshida, H.; Fujiuchi, N.; Ariizumi, T.; Ezura, H.; Fukuda, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Continuous blue lighting and elevated carbon dioxide concentration rapidly increase chlorogenic acid content in young lettuce plants Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Scientia Horticulturae Abbreviated Journal Scientia Horticulturae  
  Volume 272 Issue Pages 109550  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract Chlorogenic acid (CGA) is a strong antioxidant that potentially reduces oxidative damage in human cells. In this study, the effects of environmental factors such as photoperiod, light quality and intensity, and CO2 concentration on the growth and CGA content of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) were evaluated. CGA content in fresh lettuce increased under high light intensity treatments, doubling in concentration under 200 μmol m−2 s-1 compared to 100 μmol m−2 s-1. Elevated CO2 concentration also increased CGA content in fresh lettuce, quadrupling in concentration when grown at 1000 ppm compared to 400 ppm. Furthermore, there was a compound effect of light intensity and CO2 concentration whereby a light intensity level of 200 μmol m−2 s-1 and CO2 of 1000 ppm produced an even higher concentration of CGA, 199 mg per 100 g of fresh lettuce. Increased CGA concentration because of continuous lighting and elevated CO2 was observed under both fluorescent light and blue LED, but not under red LED treatment. Increased day length also induced higher CGA content in lettuce plants. These results show that continuous lighting, including blue spectrum and elevated CO2 concentration can cause higher CGA accumulation in lettuce plants. The observed increase in CGA content was induced only for 2 days after treatment was initiated. One possible interpretation of the data is that physiological stress caused by excess photosynthesis under continuous lighting results in higher CGA content to protect the plant body from high levels of reactive oxidative species. In addition, blue light and CO2 could be stimulus signals for inducing high CGA accumulation via metabolite changes.  
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  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0304-4238 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3090  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Weil, Z.M.; Fonken, L.K.; Walker, W.H. 2nd; Bumgarner, J.R.; Liu, J.A.; Melendez-Fernandez, O.H.; Zhang, N.; DeVries, A.C.; Nelson, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dim Light at Night Exacerbates Stroke Outcome Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication The European Journal of Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Eur J Neurosci  
  Volume in press Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Animals; Mcao; circadian rhythms; cytokines; light pollution; neuroinflammation; stroke  
  Abstract Circadian rhythms are endogenous biological cycles that synchronize physiology and behavior to promote optimal function. These ~24-hour internal rhythms are set to precisely 24 hours daily by exposure to the sun. However, the prevalence of night-time lighting has the potential to dysregulate these biological functions. Hospital patients may be particularly vulnerable to the consequences of light at night because of their compromised physiological state. A mouse model of stroke (middle cerebral artery occlusion; MCAO) was used to test the hypothesis that exposure to dim light at night impairs responses to a major insult. Stroke lesion size was substantially larger among animals housed in dLAN after reperfusion than animals maintained in dark nights. Mice housed in dLAN for three days after the stroke displayed increased post-stroke anxiety-like behavior. Overall, dLAN amplified pro-inflammatory pathways in the CNS, which may have exacerbated neuronal damage. Our results suggest that exposure to LAN is detrimental to stroke recovery.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute, West Virginia University School of Medicine, Morgantown, WV, 26506, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0953-816X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32691462 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3089  
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