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Author Shi, L.; He, H.; Yang, G.; Huang, H.; Vasseur, L.; You, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Are Yellow Sticky Cards and Light Traps Effective on Tea Green Leafhoppers and Their Predators in Chinese Tea Plantations? Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Insects Abbreviated Journal Insects  
  Volume 12 Issue 1 Pages  
  Keywords Animals; Empoasca onukii; light traps; tea plantations; yellow sticky cards  
  Abstract In Chinese tea plantations, yellow sticky cards and light traps are increasingly used to control insect pests, especially the tea green leafhopper Empoasca onukii. In this study, a 16-week open-field experiment with daily weather monitoring was designed to test the responses of tea green leafhopper, parasitoids and spiders to yellow sticky cards and three light traps with different wavelengths (covered with sticky cards). An exclosure experiment was also designed to further test the influence of the three light systems (without sticky card) on the same species. The results showed that all three light emitting diode (LED) light traps (white, green and yellow) and yellow sticky cards attracted many more E. onukii male adults than females during the course of the open field experiment, with less than 25% of trapped adults being females. Parasitoids and spiders were also attracted by these systems. Weather variables, especially rainfall, influenced the trapping efficiency. In the exclosure experiment, the population of leafhoppers in the yellow sticky card treatment did not decline significantly, but the number of spiders significantly decreased. The green and white light treatments without sticky cards showed a significant control of E. onukii and no obvious harm to spiders. These results suggest that yellow sticky cards and light traps have limited capacity to control tea green leafhoppers. However, light, especially green light, may be a promising population control measure for tea green leafhoppers, not as killing agents in the traps, but rather as a behavioral control system.  
  Address Key Laboratory of Integrated Pest Management for Fujian-Taiwan Crops, Ministry of Agriculture, Fuzhou 350002, China  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2075-4450 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:33383612 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3240  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author van Hasselt, S.J.; Hut, R.A.; Allocca, G.; Vyssotski, A.L.; Piersma, T.; Rattenborg, N.C.; Meerlo, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Cloud cover amplifies the sleep-suppressing effect of artificial light at night in geese Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Environmental Pollution Abbreviated Journal Environmental Pollution  
  Volume in press Issue Pages 116444  
  Keywords Animals; Skyglow  
  Abstract In modern society the night sky is lit up not only by the moon but also by artificial light devices. Both of these light sources can have a major impact on wildlife physiology and behaviour. For example, a number of bird species were found to sleep several hours less under full moon compared to new moon and a similar sleep-suppressing effect has been reported for artificial light at night (ALAN). Cloud cover at night can modulate the light levels perceived by wildlife, yet, in opposite directions for ALAN and moon. While clouds will block moon light, it may reflect and amplify ALAN levels and increases the night glow in urbanized areas. As a consequence, cloud cover may also modulate the sleep-suppressing effects of moon and ALAN in different directions. In this study we therefore measured sleep in barnacle geese (Branta leucopsis) under semi-natural conditions in relation to moon phase, ALAN and cloud cover. Our analysis shows that, during new moon nights stronger cloud cover was indeed associated with increased ALAN levels at our study site. In contrast, light levels during full moon nights were fairly constant, presumably because of moonlight on clear nights or because of reflected artificial light on cloudy nights. Importantly, cloud cover caused an estimated 24.8% reduction in the amount of night-time NREM sleep from nights with medium to full cloud cover, particularly during new moon when sleep was unaffected by moon light. In conclusion, our findings suggest that cloud cover can, in a rather dramatic way, amplify the immediate effects of ALAN on wildlife. Sleep appears to be highly sensitive to ALAN and may therefore be a good indicator of its biological effects.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3239  
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Author Lynn, K.D.; Tummon Flynn, P.; Manriquez, K.; Manriquez, P.H.; Pulgar, J.; Duarte, C.; Quijon, P.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial light at night alters the settlement of acorn barnacles on a man-made habitat in Atlantic Canada Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Marine Pollution Bulletin Abbreviated Journal Mar Pollut Bull  
  Volume 163 Issue Pages 111928  
  Keywords Animals; ALAN plates; Atlantic Canada; Semibalanus balanoides; Settlement  
  Abstract Human growth has caused an unprecedented increase in artificial light at night (ALAN). In coastal habitats, many species rely on day/night cycles to regulate various aspects of their life history and these cycles can be altered by this stressor. This study assessed the influence of ALAN on the early (cyprid) and late (spat) settlement stages of the acorn barnacle Semibalanus balanoides, a species widely distributed in natural and man-made coastal habitats of the North Atlantic. A newly designed settlement plate, originally for studies in rocky intertidal habitats in the southeast Pacific, was adapted to measure settlement rates on man-made habitats -wharf seawalls- located in Atlantic Canada. Plates equipped with a small LED diode powered by an internal battery (ALAN plates) were used to quantify settlement rates in comparison to plates lacking a light source (controls). These plates were deployed for 6 d in the mid-intertidal levels, where adult barnacles were readily visible. ALAN and control plates collected large number of settlers and showed to be suitable for this type of man-made habitats. The number of early settlers (cyprids) did not differ between plates but the number of late settlers (spat) was significantly lower in ALAN plates than in controls. These results suggest that light pollution has little influence on the early stages of the acorn barnacle settlement but is clearly detrimental to its late stages. As barnacles dominate in many natural and man-made hard substrates, it is likely that ALAN also has indirect effects on community structure.  
  Address Department of Biology, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, Canada. Electronic address: pquijon@upei.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0025-326X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:33418341 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3238  
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Author Pásková, M.; Budinská, N.; Zelenka, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Astrotourism–Exceeding Limits of the Earth and Tourism Definitions? Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Sustainability Abbreviated Journal Sustainability  
  Volume 13 Issue 1 Pages 373  
  Keywords Astrotourism  
  Abstract Emerging forms of alternative or even niche tourism represent a dynamic trend in tourism development. Astrotourism is completely off the beaten path. The aim of this study is to provide a deeper insight into this phenomenon. It strives to reveal motivations, experiences, and perceptions of its participants. It also aspires to propose its complex definition as an activity including both terrestrial astrotourism and space tourism. It is suggested to perceive it not only as a form of alternative and/or niche tourism, but also that of mass and professional tourism. To reach these objectives, the authors analyzed relevant published studies and astrotourism products presented on relevant websites and social media. They elaborated the collected secondary data by mental mapping and the comparative analysis of terrestrial and space tourism products. Moreover, the authors collected primary data through a survey with open-ended questions addressed to persons interested in astrotourism and through semi-structured interviews with terrestrial astrotourism participants and personalities. The results provide insight into both the specifity and variability of astrotourism and their typical products, as well as a discussion of their future trends. They also bring a motivation spectrum for the astrotourism participants and benefits perceived by them.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2071-1050 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3237  
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Author Sepp, T.; Webb, E.; Simpson, R.K.; Giraudeau, M.; McGraw, K.J.; Hutton, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light at night reduces digestive efficiency of developing birds: an experiment with king quail Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Die Naturwissenschaften Abbreviated Journal Naturwissenschaften  
  Volume 108 Issue 1 Pages 4  
  Keywords Animals; Avian; Development; Digestion; Excalfactoria chinensis; Light pollution; Steatocrit  
  Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) exposes animals to a novel environmental stimulus, one that is generally thought to be maladaptive. ALAN-related health problems have received little attention in non-model species, and we generally know little about the nutritional-physiological impacts of ALAN, especially in young animals. Here, we use a novel application of the acid steatocrit method to experimentally assess changes in digestive efficiency of growing king quail (Excalfactoria chinensis) in response to ALAN. Two weeks after hatching, quail were split into two groups (n = 20-21 per group): overnight-light-treated vs. overnight-dark-treated. When the chicks were 3 weeks old, the experimental group was exposed to weak blue light (ca. 0.3 lux) throughout the entire night for 6 consecutive weeks, until all the chicks had achieved sexual maturation. Fecal samples for assessing digestive efficiency were collected every week. We found that digestive efficiency of quail was reduced by ALAN at two time points from weeks 4 to 9 after hatching (quail reach adulthood by week 9). The negative effect of ALAN on digestion coincided with the period of fastest skeletal growth, which suggests that ALAN may reduce digestive efficiency when energetic demands of growth are at their highest. Interestingly, growth rate was not influenced by ALAN. This suggests that either the negative physiological impacts of ALAN may be concealed when food is provided ad libitum, the observed changes in digestive efficiency were too small to affect growth or condition, or that ALAN-exposed birds had reduced energy expenditure. Our results illustrate that the health impacts of ALAN on wild animals should not be restricted to traditional markers like body mass or growth rate, but instead on a wide array of integrated physiological traits.  
  Address School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, 85287, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-1042 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:33399962 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3236  
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