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Author Thompson, E.K.; Cullinan, N.L.; Jones, T.M.; Hopkins, G.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of artificial light at night and male calling on movement patterns and mate location in field crickets Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Animal Behaviour Abbreviated Journal Animal Behaviour  
  Volume 158 Issue Pages 183-191  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Anthropogenic factors, such as artificial light at night (ALAN), are increasingly linked to significant modifications in animal behaviours, such as foraging or migration. However, few studies have investigated directly whether the presence of ALAN affects the ability to find a mate (mate location). One direct effect of the presence of ALAN is that it can create a light barrier in an otherwise dark environment. This may have significant behavioural implications for nocturnally active species if it affects their ability to respond to potential mates. Our study, using the acoustically orienting Australian black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus, determined experimentally whether the presence of a fragmented light environment influenced movement patterns of virgin females and males. Moreover, given the importance of male song for reproductive outcomes in this species, we assessed simultaneously whether such behaviours were modified by the presence of a male attraction call. We found that while initiation of movement was slower in the presence of ALAN, the behavioural shifts associated with its presence were relatively small compared to the influence of a broadcast male attraction call. The response to the male attraction call was typically stronger for females than for males, but both males and females modified aspects of behaviour when it was present regardless of whether their immediate environment was fragmented by artificial light at night or not. Artificial light at night may alter subtle aspects of movement and mating behaviour in this species, but ultimately does not provide a barrier to movement or mate location.  
  Address  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0003-3472 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2752  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Te Kulve, M.; Schlangen, L.J.M.; van Marken Lichtenbelt, W.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Early evening light mitigates sleep compromising physiological and alerting responses to subsequent late evening light Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 16064  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract The widespread use of electric light and electronic devices has resulted in an excessive exposure to light during the late-evening and at night. This late light exposure acutely suppresses melatonin and sleepiness and delays the circadian clock. Here we investigate whether the acute effects of late-evening light exposure on our physiology and sleepiness are reduced when this light exposure is preceded by early evening bright light. Twelve healthy young females were included in a randomised crossover study. All participants underwent three evening (18:30-00:30) sessions during which melatonin, subjective sleepiness, body temperature and skin blood flow were measured under different light conditions: (A) dim light, (B) dim light with a late-evening (22:30-23:30) light exposure of 750 lx, 4000 K, and (C) the same late-evening light exposure, but now preceded by early-evening bright light exposure (18.30-21.00; 1200 lx, 4000 K). Late-evening light exposure reduced melatonin levels and subjective sleepiness and resulted in larger skin temperature gradients as compared to dim. Interestingly, these effects were reduced when the late-evening light was preceded by an early evening 2.5-hour bright light exposure. Thus daytime and early-evening exposure to bright light can mitigate some of the sleep-disruptive consequences of light exposure in the later evening.  
  Address Department of Human Biology & Movement Sciences, NUTRIM, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31690740; PMCID:PMC6831674 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2751  
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Author Nguyen, C.N.; Noy, I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Measuring the impact of insurance on urban earthquake recovery using nightlights Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of Economic Geography Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume in press Issue Pages lbz033  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Earthquakes; New Zealand; Night lights  
  Abstract We measure the longer-term effect of a major earthquake on the local economy, using night-time light intensity, and focus on the role of insurance payments for damaged residential property in the recovery process. The destructive Canterbury Earthquake Sequence (2010–2011) in New Zealand is our case study. Uniquely, for this event, >95% of residential housing units were covered by insurance and almost all incurred some damage. However, insurance payments were staggered over 5 years, enabling us to identify their local impact on recovery. We find that night-time luminosity can capture the process of recovery; and that insurance payments contributed significantly to the process of local economic recovery after the earthquake. Cash settlement of claims was no more effective than insurance-managed repairs in generating local recovery. Notably, delayed payments were less affective in assisting recovery; this suggests an important role for the regulator in making sure insurance payments are made promptly after disaster events.  
  Address School of Economics and Finance, Victoria University of Wellington, Kelburn, Wellington, New Zealand; ilan.noy(at)vuw.ac.nz  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Oxford Academic Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1468-2702 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2750  
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Author Wallner, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Usage of Vertical Fisheye-Images to Quantify Urban Light Pollution on Small Scales and the Impact of LED Conversion Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of Imaging Abbreviated Journal J. Imaging  
  Volume 5 Issue 11 Pages 86  
  Keywords Instrumentation  
  Abstract The aim of this work was to develop an easy and quick technique for characterizing various lighting situations, that is, single lamps or illuminated signs and to quantify impacts on small scales like streets, buildings and near areas. The method uses a DSLR-camera equipped with fisheye-lens and the software Sky Quality Camera, both commonly used as part of night sky imagery in the light pollution community, to obtain information about luminance and correlated colour temperature. As a difference to its usual build-up, observed light emitting sources were captured by pointing the camera towards analysed objects, that is, images were taken via vertical plane imaging with very short exposure times under one second. Results have proven that this technique provides a practical way to quantify the lighting efficacy in a certain place or area, as a quantitative analysis of the direct emission towards the observer and the illumination on surroundings, that is, street surfaces, sidewalks and buildings, was performed. When conducting lamp conversions, the method can be used to characterize the gradient of change and could be a useful tool for municipalities to find the optimal lighting solution. The paper shows examples of different lighting situations like single lamps of different types, also containing various luminaires, illuminated billboards or buildings and impacts of the lighting transition to LEDs in the city of Eisenstadt, Austria. The horizontal fisheye method is interdisciplinary applicable, for example, being suitable for lighting management, to sustainability and energy saving purposes.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2313-433X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2749  
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Author Li, X.; Liu, Z.; Chen, X.; Meng, Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Assessment of the impact of the 2010 Haiti earthquake on human activity based on DMSP/OLS time series nighttime light data Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of Applied Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal J. Appl. Rem. Sens.  
  Volume 13 Issue 04 Pages 1  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Earthquake disasters and postdisaster reconstruction have profound impacts on human society. We use time series nighttime light images collected by the defense meteorological satellite program-operational linescan system sensors as a proxy data source for human activities (HAs). After calibration, a time series analysis method is used to study the distribution and intensity of the changes in HAs after an earthquake. We consider the Haiti earthquake an example to analyze the HA sequence patterns and the aggregation patterns of the HA centers. The results show the following: (1) postearthquake recovery and reconstruction efforts led to increases in the long-term HAs, but the level of increased HA was usually low. (2) The level of postearthquake HAs in the most affected areas (seismic intensity zone VIII+) increased, whereas the postearthquake HAs in severely affected areas (seismic intensity zones VI and VII) were more fragmented. (3) The recovery of HAs in seismic intensity zone VIII+ (mainly Port-au-Prince) required 2 years, but the actual time may be far longer.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1931-3195 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2748  
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