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Author Lang, W.; Pan, M.; Wu, J.; Chen, T.; Li, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The patterns and driving forces of uneven regional growth in ASEAN countries: A tale of two Thailands' path toward regional coordinated development Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Growth and Change Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Uneven development has long been a critical issue in geography and urban studies, leading to economically inefficient urbanization, environmentally unbalanced regions, and socially unequal livelihoods. As one result, primate cities and urban primacy form within a hierarchical urban system, to which urban and regional planning must positively respond. It is worth noting that Thailand has experienced a number of important urbanization issues related to developing countries, such as semicolonialism and internal colonialism. This study aims to investigate regional uneven development based on primacy theory and the rank‐size rule, which are common in most Asian and developing countries. We examined the urbanization processes in Thailand, from 2000 to 2015, by looking at factors of population, GDP, land use, transportation networks, and nighttime light, which provide very recent regional development patterns. The second set of analyses explained the degree of primacy among different provinces and their ranking hierarchies. By presenting the persistent disparities of contemporary urbanization in Thailand and exploring its driving forces, this study offers insights into planning and policy and underscores the importance of regional coordinated development for achieving sustainable urbanization in Southeast Asian countries.  
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  Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial (down) 3351  
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Author Dar, A. A., Jamal, K. url  openurl
  Title THE DECLINE OF MOTHS GLOBALLY: A REVIEW OF POSSIBLE CAUSES Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Munis Entomology and Zoology Journal Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 310-319  
  Keywords Review; Animals  
  Abstract The dramatic increase in decline of moths constitutes a great threat to ecosystem, leads to biodiversity crisis of moths. Loss of moth diversity has been inadequately quantified because of nocturnal nature of moths. The substantial decline of moths has been reported in various countries such as U.K, U.S, Germany, Sweden, India, Netherlands, Siberia and New Zealand. 31%, 44%, 27% and 71% of moths declined in Great Britain, Southern Britain, Sweden and Netherlands respectively. Collapsing of moths is a prime concern, because they serve as food for wide range of taxa, such as birds, bats, spiders and reptiles. While as, moth larvae are fed on by insects, bacteria and fungi. The various major potential drivers responsible for causing dwindling of moth population are destruction of habitat, climatic change, intensification of agriculture, urbanization, chemical pollution, artificial light pollution and invasion of non-native species. In this article, overall review on the global decline of moths is discussed, including the preventive measures and future perspective.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial (down) 3350  
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Author Ditmer, M.A.; Iannarilli, F.; Tri, A.N.; Garshelis, D.L.; Carter, N.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial night light helps account for observer bias in citizen science monitoring of an expanding large mammal population Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication The Journal of Animal Ecology Abbreviated Journal J Anim Ecol  
  Volume 90 Issue 2 Pages 330-342  
  Keywords Animals; Remote sensing; bears; human-wildlife interactions; occupancy model; range expansion; spatial bias; species monitoring  
  Abstract The integration of citizen scientists into ecological research is transforming how, where, and when data are collected, and expanding the potential scales of ecological studies. Citizen-science projects can provide numerous benefits for participants while educating and connecting professionals with lay audiences, potentially increasing the acceptance of conservation and management actions. However, for all the benefits, collection of citizen-science data is often biased towards areas that are easily accessible (e.g. developments and roadways), and thus data are usually affected by issues typical of opportunistic surveys (e.g. uneven sampling effort). These areas are usually illuminated by artificial light at night (ALAN), a dynamic sensory stimulus that alters the perceptual world for both humans and wildlife. Our goal was to test whether satellite-based measures of ALAN could improve our understanding of the detection process of citizen-scientist-reported sightings of a large mammal. We collected observations of American black bears Ursus americanus (n = 1,315) outside their primary range in Minnesota, USA, as part of a study to gauge population expansion. Participants from the public provided sighting locations of bears on a website. We used an occupancy modelling framework to determine how well ALAN accounted for observer metrics compared to other commonly used metrics (e.g. housing density). Citizen scientists reported 17% of bear sightings were under artificially lit conditions and monthly ALAN estimates did the best job accounting for spatial bias in detection of all observations, based on AIC values and effect sizes ( beta ^ = 0.81, 0.71-0.90 95% CI). Bear detection increased with elevated illuminance; relative abundance was positively associated with natural cover, proximity to primary bear range and lower road density. Although the highest counts of bear sightings occurred in the highly illuminated suburbs of the Minneapolis-St. Paul metropolitan region, we estimated substantially higher bear abundance in another region with plentiful natural cover and low ALAN (up to ~375% increased predicted relative abundance) where observations were sparse. We demonstrate the importance of considering ALAN radiance when analysing citizen-scientist-collected data, and we highlight the ways that ALAN data provide a dynamic snapshot of human activity.  
  Address School for Environment and Sustainability, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0021-8790 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32895962 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3349  
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Author Portnov, B.A.; Saad, R.; Trop, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Interactive Scenario-Based Assessment Approach of Urban Street Lighting and Its Application to Estimating Energy Saving Benefits Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Energies Abbreviated Journal Energies  
  Volume 14 Issue 2 Pages 378  
  Keywords Lighting; Energy; Perception  
  Abstract If excessive and misdirected, street lighting (SL) causes energy waste and might pose significant risks to humans and natural ecosystems. Based on data collected by an interactive user-oriented method, we developed a novel empirical approach that enables the spatial identification of over-illuminated areas in residential neighborhoods and calculation of potential energy savings that can be achieved there, by reducing excessive illumination. We applied the estimated model to a densely populated residential neighborhood in the City of Tel Aviv-Yafo in Israel, to test the proposed approach’s performance. According to our estimates, illumination levels can be lowered by up to 50% in approximately 60% of the neighborhood’s area, which is currently over-illuminated, thus leading to significant energy savings, while preserving a reasonable level of visual comfort associated with SL.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1996-1073 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3348  
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Author Yue, J.; Perwitasari, S.; Xu, S.; Hozumi, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Sakanoi, T.; Saito, A.; Miller, S.D.; Straka, W.; Rong, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Preliminary Dual-Satellite Observations of Atmospheric Gravity Waves in Airglow Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Atmosphere Abbreviated Journal Atmosphere  
  Volume 10 Issue 11 Pages 650  
  Keywords Remote sensing; airglow  
  Abstract Atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs) are among the important energy and momentum transfer mechanisms from the troposphere to the middle and upper atmosphere. Despite their understood importance in governing the structure and dynamics of these regions, mesospheric AGWs remain poorly measured globally, and largely unconstrained in numerical models. Since late 2011, the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) day–night band (DNB) has observed global AGWs near the mesopause by virtue of its sensitivity to weak emissions of the OH* Meinel bands. The wave features, detectable at 0.75 km spatial resolution across its 3000 km imagery swath, are often confused by the upwelling emission of city lights and clouds reflecting downwelling nightglow. The Ionosphere, Mesosphere, upper Atmosphere and Plasmasphere (IMAP)/ Visible and near-Infrared Spectral Imager (VISI) O2 band, an independent measure of the AGW structures in nightglow based on the International Space Station (ISS) during 2012–2015, contains much less noise from the lower atmosphere. However, VISI offers much coarser resolution of 14–16 km and a narrower swath width of 600 km. Here, we present preliminary results of comparisons between VIIRS/DNB and VISI observations of AGWs, focusing on several concentric AGW events excited by the thunderstorms over Eastern Asia in August 2013. The comparisons point toward suggested improvements for future spaceborne airglow sensor designs targeting AGWs.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2073-4433 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3347  
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