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Author Masri, S.; Sassone-Corsi, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The emerging link between cancer, metabolism, and circadian rhythms Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Nature Medicine Abbreviated Journal Nat Med  
  Volume 24 Issue 12 Pages 1795-1803  
  Keywords Human Health; Review  
  Abstract The circadian clock is a complex cellular mechanism that, through the control of diverse metabolic and gene expression pathways, governs a large array of cyclic physiological processes. Epidemiological and clinical data reveal a connection between the disruption of circadian rhythms and cancer that is supported by recent preclinical data. In addition, results from animal models and molecular studies underscore emerging links between cancer metabolism and the circadian clock. This has implications for therapeutic approaches, and we discuss the possible design of chronopharmacological strategies.  
  Address Department of Biological Chemistry, Center for Epigenetics and Metabolism, INSERM U1233, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA. psc@uci.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor (down) Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1078-8956 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30523327 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2135  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Halfwerk, W.; Blaas, M.; Kramer, L.; Hijner, N.; Trillo, P.A.; Bernal, X.E.; Page, R.A.; Goutte, S.; Ryan, M.J.; Ellers, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Adaptive changes in sexual signalling in response to urbanization Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Nature Ecology & Evolution Abbreviated Journal Nat Ecol Evol  
  Volume 3 Issue Pages 374-380  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Urbanization can cause species to adjust their sexual displays, because the effectiveness of mating signals is influenced by environmental conditions. Despite many examples that show that mating signals in urban conditions differ from those in rural conditions, we do not know whether these differences provide a combined reproductive and survival benefit to the urban phenotype. Here we show that male tungara frogs have increased the conspicuousness of their calls, which is under strong sexual and natural selection by signal receivers, as an adaptive response to city life. The urban phenotype consequently attracts more females than the forest phenotype, while avoiding the costs that are imposed by eavesdropping bats and midges, which we show are rare in urban areas. Finally, we show in a translocation experiment that urban frogs can reduce risk of predation and parasitism when moved to the forest, but that forest frogs do not increase their sexual attractiveness when moved to the city. Our findings thus reveal that urbanization can rapidly drive adaptive signal change via changes in both natural and sexual selection pressures.  
  Address Department of Ecological Science, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor (down) Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2397-334X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30532046 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2136  
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Author Lowden, A.; Lemos, N.; Gonçalves, B.; Öztürk, G.; Louzada, F.; Pedrazzoli, M.; Moreno, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Delayed Sleep in Winter Related to Natural Daylight Exposure among Arctic Day Workers Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Clocks & Sleep Abbreviated Journal Clocks & Sleep  
  Volume 1 Issue 1 Pages 105-116  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Natural daylight exposures in arctic regions vary substantially across seasons. Negative consequences have been observed in self-reports of sleep and daytime functions during the winter but have rarely been studied in detail. The focus of the present study set out to investigate sleep seasonality among indoor workers using objective and subjective measures. Sleep seasonality among daytime office workers (n = 32) in Kiruna (Sweden, 67.86° N, 20.23° E) was studied by comparing the same group of workers in a winter and summer week, including work and days off at the weekend, using actigraphs (motion loggers) and subjective ratings of alertness and mood. Actigraph analyses showed delayed sleep onset of 39 min in winter compared to the corresponding summer week (p < 0.0001) and shorter weekly sleep duration by 12 min (p = 0.0154). A delay of mid-sleep was present in winter at workdays (25 min, p < 0.0001) and more strongly delayed during days off (46 min, p < 0.0001). Sleepiness levels were higher in winter compared to summer (p < 0.05). Increased morning light exposure was associated with earlier mid-sleep (p < 0.001), while increased evening light exposure was associated with delay (p < 0.01). This study confirms earlier work that suggests that lack of natural daylight delays the sleep/wake cycle in a group of indoor workers, despite having access to electric lighting. Photic stimuli resulted in a general advanced sleep/wake rhythm during summer and increased alertness levels.  
  Address  
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  Series Editor (down) Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2624-5175 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2137  
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Author Zerbini, G.; Kantermann, T.; Merrow, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Strategies to decrease social jetlag: Reducing evening blue light advances sleep and melatonin Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The European Journal of Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Eur J Neurosci  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract The timing of sleep is under the control of the circadian clock, which uses light to entrain to the external light-dark cycle. A combination of genetic, physiological and environmental factors produces individual differences in chronotype (entrained phase as manifest in sleep timing). A mismatch between circadian and societal (e.g., work) clocks leads to a condition called social jetlag, which is characterized by changing sleep times over work and free days and accumulation of sleep debt. Social jetlag, which is prevalent in late chronotypes, has been related to several health issues. One way to reduce social jetlag would be to advance the circadian clock via modifications of the light environment. We thus performed two intervention field studies to describe methods for decreasing social jetlag. One study decreased evening light exposure (via blue-light-blocking glasses) and the other used increased morning light (via the use of curtains). We measured behaviour as well as melatonin; the latter in order to validate that behaviour was consistent with this neuroendocrinological phase marker of the circadian clock. We found that a decrease in evening blue light exposure led to an advance in melatonin and sleep onset on workdays. Increased morning light exposure advanced neither melatonin secretion nor sleep timing. Neither protocol led to a significant change in social jetlag. Despite this, our findings show that controlling light exposure at home can be effective in advancing melatonin secretion and sleep, thereby helping late chronotypes to better cope with early social schedules.  
  Address Institute of Medical Psychology, LMU Munich, Munich, Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor (down) Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0953-816X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30506899 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2138  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Rabstein, S.; Burek, K.; Lehnert, M.; Beine, A.; Vetter, C.; Harth, V.; Putzke, S.; Kantermann, T.; Walther, J.; Wang-Sattler, R.; Pallapies, D.; Brüning, T.; Behrens, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Differences in twenty-four-hour profiles of blue-light exposure between day and night shifts in female medical staff Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Science of The Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Science of The Total Environment  
  Volume 653 Issue Pages 1025-1033  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Light is the strongest zeitgeber currently known for the synchronization of the human circadian timing system. Especially shift workers are exposed to altered daily light profiles. Our objective is the characterization of differences in blue-light exposures between day and night shift taking into consideration modifying factors such as chronotype. We describe 24-hour blue-light profiles as measured with ambient light data loggers (LightWatcher) during up to three consecutive days with either day or night shifts in 100 female hospital staff including 511 observations. Linear mixed models were applied to analyze light profiles and to select time-windows for the analysis of associations between shift work, individual factors, and log mean light exposures as well as the duration of darkness per day. Blue-light profiles reflected different daily activities and were mainly influenced by work time. Except for evening (7–9 p.m.), all time windows showed large differences in blue-light exposures between day and night shifts. Night work reduced the duration of darkness per day by almost 4 h (beta = −3:48 hh:mm, 95% CI (−4:27; −3.09)). Late chronotypes had higher light exposures in the morning and evening compared to women with intermediate chronotype (e.g. morning beta = 0.50 log(mW/m2/nm), 95% CI (0.08; 0.93)). Women with children had slightly higher light exposures in the afternoon than women without children (beta = 0.48, 95% CI (−0.10; 1,06)). Time windows for the description of light should be chosen carefully with regard to timing of shifts. Our results are helpful for future studies to capture relevant light exposure differences and potential collinearities with individual factors. Improvement of well-being of shift workers with altered light profiles may therefore require consideration of both – light at the workplace and outside working hours.  
  Address  
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  Series Editor (down) Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2139  
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