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Author Anbalagan, M.; Dauchy, R.; Xiang, S.; Robling, A.; Blask, D.; Rowan, B.; Hill, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title SAT-337 Disruption Of The Circadian Melatonin Signal By Dim Light At Night Promotes Bone-lytic Breast Cancer Metastases Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of the Endocrine Society Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 3 Issue Supplement_1 Pages  
  Keywords Human Health; Cancer; Breast cancer; melatonin; shift work; mouse models  
  Abstract Breast cancer metastasis to bone is a major source of morbidity and mortality in women with advanced metastatic breast cancer. Morbidity from metastasis to bone is compounded by the fact that they cannot be surgically removed and can only be treated with chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. Thus, there is critical need to develop new treatment strategies that kill bone metastatic tumors and reduce osteolytic lesions to improve patient quality of life and extend patient survival. Circadian rhythms are daily cycles of ~24 h that control many if not most physiologic processes and their disruption by exposure to light at night (LAN) or jet lag has been shown to be strongly associated with the development of cancer, particularly breast cancer. We have found that disruption of the anti-cancer circadian hormone melatonin (MLT) by light at night can significantly enhance the metastatic potential in breast cancer cells. Our work supports the report of the International Agency for Research on Cancer that shift work is a “probable human carcinogen” and highlights the association between exposure to light at night and invasive breast cancer. We recently reported that human breast tumor xenografts grown in athymic nude female rats housed in a photoperiod of 12h light at day: 12h dim light at night (dLAN, 0.2 lux – blocks the nighttime circadian MLT signal), display resistance to doxorubicin (Dox). More importantly, tumor growth and drug resistance could be blocked by the administration of Dox in circadian alignment with nocturnal MLT during dLAN. Our recent preliminary studies show that poorly invasive ERα positive MCF-7 breast cancer cells, when injected into the tibia (to mimic bone metastatic disease) of Foxn1nu athymic nude mice (which produce a strong circadian nighttime melatonin signal) housed in a dLAN photoperiod (suppressed nocturnal MLT production) developed full blown breast cancer tumors in bone (P<0.05) that are highly osteolytic (P<0.05). Moreover, patients with metastatic breast cancer are routinely treated with doxorubicin, which itself can promote bone damage. Our studies demonstrate that MLT slows the growth of metastatic breast cancer in bone but that the chrono-therapeutic use of doxorubicin in circadian alignment with melatonin in Foxn1nu mice with tibial breast tumors, reduced tumor growth in bone, reduced bone erosion, and promoted the formation of new bone. Successful use of this chronotherapeutic use of Dox and MLT in clinical trials increasing efficacy in preventing or suppressing breast cancer metastasis to bone while decreasing toxic side effects of doxorubicin would provide a revolutionary advancement in the treatment of bone metastatic breast cancer and decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with breast cancer metastasis to bone.  
  Address Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, United States  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Oxford Academic Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language (down) English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2472-1972 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2433  
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Author Edensor, T.; Andrews, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Walking the creek: reconnecting place through light projection Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Geographical Research Abbreviated Journal Geographical Research  
  Volume 57 Issue 3 Pages 263-274  
  Keywords Society; Psychology; Australia; public amenity; placemaking; light projection  
  Abstract In this paper, we explore how a light projection sought to convey a range of qualities: conviviality, a sense of place, playfulness, defamiliarisation, and the affective and sensory capacities that were experienced through walking in the distinctive, liminal realm of Bendigo Creek in Victoria, Australia. The projection aspired to solicit a sensory and affective empathy that chimed with the experiences of an earlier event in which dozens of pedestrians were filmed walking in the creek. The projection contributed to a local campaign to reappraise the much‐maligned creek as a local public amenity. We discuss the productive potential of solitary and collective walking and, subsequently, the attributes of the projection in its static and mobile manifestation. In so doing, we suggest that publicly engaged, inclusive, creative practice can offer potent place‐making possibilities.  
  Address School of Geography, University of Melbourne, Carlton, Victoria, Australia; t.edensor(at)mmu.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language (down) English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1745-5863 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2435  
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Author Dwyer, J. F., Pandey, A. K., McHale, L. A., & Harness, R. E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Near-ultraviolet light reduced Sandhill Crane collisions with a power line by 98% Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication The Condor: Ornithological Applications Abbreviated Journal Condor  
  Volume 121 Issue 2 Pages duz008  
  Keywords Animals; Birds; Sandhill Cranes; Antigone canadensis; power lines; collisions; Avian Collision Avoidance System; ACAS  
  Abstract Midflight collisions with power lines impact 12 of the world’s 15 crane species, including 1 critically endangered species, 3 endangered species, and 5 vulnerable species. Power lines can be fitted with line markers to increase the visibility of wires to reduce collisions, but collisions can persist on marked power lines. For example, hundreds of Sandhill Cranes (Antigone canadensis) die annually in collisions with marked power lines at the Iain Nicolson Audubon Center at Rowe Sanctuary (Rowe), a major migratory stopover location near Gibbon, Nebraska. Mitigation success has been limited because most collisions occur nocturnally when line markers are least visible, even though roughly half the line markers present include glow-in-the-dark stickers. To evaluate an alternative mitigation strategy at Rowe, we used a randomized design to test collision mitigation effects of a pole-mounted near-ultraviolet light (UV-A; 380–395 nm) Avian Collision Avoidance System (ACAS) to illuminate a 258-m power line span crossing the Central Platte River. We observed 48 Sandhill Crane collisions and 217 dangerous flights of Sandhill Crane flocks during 19 nights when the ACAS was off, but just 1 collision and 39 dangerous flights during 19 nights when the ACAS was on. Thus, we documented a 98% decrease in collisions and an 82% decrease in dangerous flights when the ACAS was on. We also found a 32% decrease in the number of evasive maneuvers initiated within 25 m of the power line along the river, and a 71% increase in the number of evasive maneuvers initiated beyond 25 m when the ACAS was on. Sandhill Cranes reacted sooner and with more control, and experienced substantially fewer collisions, when the ACAS was on. Installation of the ACAS on other high-risk spans, and perhaps on other anthropogenic obstacles where birds collide, may offer a new solution to a long-running conservation dilemma.  
  Address EDM International, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA; jdwyer(at)edmlink.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Oxford Academic Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language (down) English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2473  
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Author Wilson, P.; Thums, M.; Pattiaratchi, C.; Whiting, S.; Pendoley, K.; Ferreira, L.C.; Meekan, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title High predation of marine turtle hatchlings near a coastal jetty Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biological Conservation  
  Volume 236 Issue Pages 571-579  
  Keywords Animals; Sea turtles; marine turtles; reptiles; marine reptiles; Flatback turtle; Natator depressus; jetty  
  Abstract Growing human populations are driving the development of coastal infrastructure such as port facilities. Here, we used passive acoustic telemetry to examine the effects of a jetty and artificial light on the rates of predation of flatback turtle (Natator depressus) hatchlings as they disperse through nearshore waters. When released near a jetty, around 70% of the tagged hatchlings were predated before they could transit the nearshore, irrespective of the presence or absence of artificial light. Only 3 to 23% of hatchlings encountered predators at a second study site nearby where there was no jetty and a similar amount of nesting activity. Evidence for predation was provided by rapid tag detachment due to prey handling by a predator or the extensive movement of the tags within the receiver array suggesting that the tag (and hatchling) was inside the stomach of a predator. We found that 70% of the fish predators that consumed tags used the jetty as a refuge during the day and expanded their range along nearshore waters at night, predating on hatchlings in areas adjacent to the jetty with the highest nesting density. Sampling of potential predators including lutjanid reef fishes under the jetty revealed the presence of turtle hatchlings in their gut contents. By providing daytime refuges for predators, nearshore structures such as jetties have the potential to concentrate predators and they may pose a significant threat to populations of vulnerable species. Such effects must be taken into consideration when assessing the environmental impacts associated with these structures.  
  Address Oceans Graduate School and the UWA Oceans Institute, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Perth, Western Australia 6009, Australia; phillipa.wilson(at)research.uwa.edu.au  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language (down) English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2496  
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Author Song, J.; Tong, X.; Wang, L.; Zhao, C.; Prishchepov, A.V. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Monitoring finer-scale population density in urban functional zones: A remote sensing data fusion approach Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Landscape and Urban Planning Abbreviated Journal Landscape and Urban Planning  
  Volume 190 Issue Pages 103580  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; nighttime light; numerical methods  
  Abstract Spatial distribution information on population density is essential for understanding urban dynamics. In recent decades, remote sensing techniques have often been applied to assess population density, particularly night-time light data (NTL). However, such attempts have resulted in mapped population density at coarse/medium resolution, which often limits the applicability of such data for fine-scale territorial planning. The improved quality and availability of multi-source remote sensing imagery and location-based service data (LBS) (from mobile networks or social media) offers new potential for providing more accurate population information at the micro-scale level. In this paper, we developed a fine-scale population distribution mapping approach by combining the functional zones (FZ) mapped with high-resolution satellite images, NTL data, and LBS data. Considering the possible variations in the relationship between population distribution and nightlight brightness in functional zones, we tested and found spatial heterogeneity of the relationship between NTL and the population density of LBS samples. Geographically weighted regression (GWR) was thus implemented to test potential improvements to the mapping accuracy. The performance of the following four models was evaluated: only ordinary least squares regression (OLS), only GWR, OLS with functional zones (OLS&FZ) and GWR with functional zones (GWR&FZ). The results showed that NTL-based GWR&FZ was the most accurate and robust approach, with an accuracy of 0.71, while the mapped population density was at a unit of 30 m spatial resolution. The detailed population density maps developed in our approach can contribute to fine-scale urban planning, healthcare and emergency responses in many parts of the world.  
  Address Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, University of Copenhagen, 1350 Copenhagen, Denmark; songjinchao08(at)163.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language (down) English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0169-2046 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2516  
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