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Author Wallace, A. R.
Title (down) The Malay Archipelago the land of the orang-utan and the bird of paradise: a narrative of travel, with studies of man and nature Type Journal Article
Year 1869 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Animals; Moths
Abstract Excerpt: “As soon as it got dark I placed my lamp on a table against the wall, and with pins, insect-forceps, net, and collecting boxes by my side, sat down with a book. Sometimes during the whole evening only one solitary moth would visit me, while on other nights they would pour in, in a continual stream, keeping me hard at work catching and pinning till past midnight.”
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Macmillan and Co Place of Publication London Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2524
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Author Bensch, G.; Peters, J.; Sievert, M.
Title (down) The lighting transition in rural Africa — From kerosene to battery-powered LED and the emerging disposal problem Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Energy for Sustainable Development Abbreviated Journal Energy for Sustainable Development
Volume 39 Issue Pages 13-20
Keywords Lighting; Energy
Abstract People without electricity access, numbering today more than 500 million in rural Africa alone, have been using dim and sooty kerosene lamps and candles for their lighting purposes for decades. In the present paper, current lighting usage patterns are systematically assessed using detailed new survey data from seven countries across Sub-Saharan Africa. The data makes evident that a transition has taken place in recent years, both unnoticed by and without external support from governmental or non-governmental organizations: the rural population without electricity in Africa has replaced kerosene lights and candles by simple, yet more efficient and cleaner LED lamps powered by non-rechargeable batteries. Nevertheless, we also show that the discharged batteries are generally disposed of inappropriately in latrines or the nature. The toxic content of many dry-cell batteries and their accumulation at local litter hotspots may have harmful repercussions on health and the environment. We conclude by suggesting that rapid action is needed to, first, install an effective monitoring system on batteries that enter the continent and, second, put in place an appropriate waste management system.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0973-0826 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2193
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Author Déjardin, G.
Title (down) The Light of the Night Sky Type Journal Article
Year 1936 Publication Reviews of Modern Physics Abbreviated Journal Rev. Mod. Phys.
Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages 1-21
Keywords Skyglow; Review
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0034-6861 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2405
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Author Schulte-Römer, N.; Meier, J.; Söding, M.; Dannemann, E.
Title (down) The LED Paradox: How Light Pollution Challenges Experts to Reconsider Sustainable Lighting Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Sustainability Abbreviated Journal Sustainability
Volume 11 Issue 21 Pages 6160
Keywords Energy; Lighting; Society
Abstract In the 21st century, the notion of “sustainable lighting” is closely associated with LED technology. In the past ten years, municipalities and private light users worldwide have installed light-emitting diodes in urban spaces and public streets to save energy. Yet an increasing body of interdisciplinary research suggests that supposedly sustainable LED installations are in fact unsustainable, because they increase light pollution. Paradoxically, blue-rich cool-white LED lighting, which is the most energy-efficient, also appears to be the most ecologically unfriendly. Biologists, physicians and ecologists warn that blue-rich LED light disturbs the circadian day-and-night rhythm of living organisms, including humans, with potential negative health effects on individual species and whole ecosystems. Can the paradox be solved? This paper explores this question based on our transdisciplinary research project Light Pollution—A Global Discussion. It reveals how light pollution experts and lighting professionals see the challenges and potential of LED lighting from their different viewpoints. This expert feedback shows that “sustainable LED lighting” goes far beyond energy efficiency as it raises complex design issues that imply stakeholder negotiation. It also suggests that the LED paradox may be solved in context, but hardly in principle.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2071-1050 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2824
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Author Wahl, S.; Engelhardt, M.; Schaupp, P.; Lappe, C.; Ivanov, I.V.
Title (down) The inner clock – blue light sets the human rhythm Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Biophotonics Abbreviated Journal J Biophotonics
Volume 12 Issue 12 Pages e201900102
Keywords Human Health; blue light; circadian rhythm; melanopsin; melatonin; visible light
Abstract Visible light synchronizes the human biological clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus to the solar 24-hour cycle. Short wavelengths, perceived as blue color, are the strongest synchronizing agent for the circadian system that keeps most biological and psychological rhythms internally synchronized. Circadian rhythm is important for optimum function of organisms and circadian sleep-wake disruptions or chronic misalignment often may lead to psychiatric and neurodegenerative illness. The beneficial effect on circadian synchronization, sleep quality, mood, and cognitive performance depends not only on the light spectral composition but also on the timing of exposure and its intensity. Exposure to blue light during the day is important to suppress melatonin secretion, the hormone that is produced by the pineal gland and plays crucial role in circadian rhythm entrainment. While the exposure to blue is important for keeping organism's wellbeing, alertness, and cognitive performance during the day, chronic exposure to low-intensity blue light directly before bed-time, may have serious implications on sleep quality, circadian phase and cycle durations. This rises inevitably the need for solutions to improve wellbeing, alertness and cognitive performance in today's modern society where exposure to blue light emitting devices is ever increasing. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Address Carl Zeiss Vision International GmbH, Aalen, Germany
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1864-063X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31433569 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2655
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