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Author Wilson, P.; Thums, M.; Pattiaratchi, C.; Meekan, M.; Pendoley, K.; Fisher, R.; Whiting, S.
Title (up) Artificial light disrupts the nearshore dispersal of neonate flatback turtles Natator depressus Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Marine Ecology Progress Series Abbreviated Journal Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser.
Volume 600 Issue Pages 179-192
Keywords Animals
Abstract After emerging from nests, neonate sea turtles entering the water are thought to orientate away from shore using wave cues to guide them out to sea. Artificial light may interfere with this process, but the relative importance of natural and anthropogenic cues to the dispersal of hatchlings is unknown. Here, we used acoustic telemetry to track the movement of flatback turtle (Natator depressus) hatchlings dispersing through nearshore waters. Turtles dispersed in the presence and absence of artificial light through a receiver array where a range of oceanographic variables were measured. Turtle tracks were analysed using a full subsets Generalised Additive Mixed Model approach to identify the most important cues influencing the bearing, variance in bearing (a measure of the ability to orientate directly), rate of travel and time spent in the array. Artificial light reduced their swim speed by up to 30%, increased the amount of time spent in nearshore waters (by 50–150%) and increased the variance in bearing (100–180% more variable), regardless of oceanographic conditions. Under ambient conditions, ocean currents affected the bearing of hatchlings as they left the shore, but when light was present, this effect was diminished, showing turtles actively swam against currents in their attempts to move towards light. After accounting for the effects of currents on hatchlings dispersing under ambient conditions, turtles swam offshore by moving perpendicular to the coastline and did not appear to orient into incident wave direction. Overall, light disrupted the dispersal of hatchlings causing them to linger, become disoriented in the near shore and expend energy swimming against ocean currents.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1967
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Author Berge, J.; Geoffroy, M.; Daase, M.; Cottier, F.; Priou, P.; Cohen, J.H.; Johnsen, G.; McKee, D.; Kostakis, I.; Renaud, P.E.; Vogedes, D.; Anderson, P.; Last, K.S.; Gauthier, S.
Title (up) Artificial light during the polar night disrupts Arctic fish and zooplankton behaviour down to 200 m depth Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Communications Biology Abbreviated Journal Commun Biol
Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages article 102
Keywords Animals
Abstract For organisms that remain active in one of the last undisturbed and pristine dark environments on the planet—the Arctic Polar Night—the moon, stars and aurora borealis may provide important cues to guide distribution and behaviours, including predator-prey interactions. With a changing climate and increased human activities in the Arctic, such natural light sources will in many places be masked by the much stronger illumination from artificial light. Here we show that normal working-light from a ship may disrupt fish and zooplankton behaviour down to at least 200 m depth across an area of >0.125 km2 around the ship. Both the quantitative and qualitative nature of the disturbance differed between the examined regions. We conclude that biological surveys in the dark from illuminated ships may introduce biases on biological sampling, bioacoustic surveys, and possibly stock assessments of commercial and non-commercial species.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2399-3642 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2837
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Author Camejo, D.; Frutos, A.; Mestre, T.C.; del Carmen Piñero, M.; Rivero, R.M.; Martínez, V.
Title (up) Artificial light impacts the physical and nutritional quality of lettuce plants Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Horticulture, Environment, and Biotechnology Abbreviated Journal Hortic. Environ. Biotechnol.
Volume 61 Issue 1 Pages 69-82
Keywords Plants; Antioxidants; Bioactive compounds; Enzymes; Growth; lettuce; Lactuca sativa
Abstract Leafy vegetables, including lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), are considered to be healthy due to their high content of fiber, folate, carotenoids, phenolic and antioxidant compounds, minerals, and vitamins A, C, and K. Recently, LEDs are being used extensively as a supplementary light source in indoor agriculture due to the economical and physiological advantages that this artificial illumination offers compared to traditional fluorescence illumination. In this work, two commercially important lettuce varieties, Batavia Lettony (green leaves) and Batavia Diablotin (red leaves), were used to study the impact of LEDs (white and red–blue lights) and fluorescent illumination on their quality and health properties. Changes in the photosynthetic photon flux density from 250 to 400 µmol m−2 s−1 of fluorescent light increased growth parameters (leaf number, fresh and dry weight, and percentage of dry matter) of B. Lettony plants. We observed a positive impact of red–blue LED illumination on growth parameters analyzed in B. Diablotin plants compared to plants grown under fluorescent light at 250 µmol m−2 s−1. Leaf texture significantly increased in B. Lettony plants grown under 400 µmol m−2 s−1 fluorescent and LED illumination compared to that of plants grown under 250 µmol m−2 s−1 fluorescent light. This variable was only increased under red–blue LED illumination in B. Diablotin plants. Accumulation of bioactive compounds, such as anthocyanins and vitamin C, was higher in B. Diablotin plants grown under 250 µmol m−2 s−1 fluorescent light. Nutrient content in the foliar part was not modified under the light conditions used, except the Ca2+ content of B. Lettony plants grown under PPFD 400 µmol m−2 s−1 fluorescent light. Catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POX) activities were differentially modified by light conditions in B. Lettony plants. However, POX activity was only modified in response to light conditions in B. Diablotin plants. Thus, this study demonstrates that LEDs could be used as an alternative to produce food under sustainable conditions. In this sense, although several horticultural studies have been conducted to establish the effectiveness of LEDs in lettuce growth, additional investigations are necessary to determine the optimal conditions for the use of LEDs to promote lettuce production and the accumulation of beneficial components, such as vitamins, minerals, fiber, and antioxidant compounds.
Address Department of Plant Nutrition, CEBAS-CSIC, Campus Universitario de Espinardo, P.O. Box 164, 30100, Espinardo, Murcia, Spain;
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2211-3452 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3393
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Author Mcmunn, M. S., Yang, L. H., Ansalmo, A., Bucknam, K., Claret, M., Clay, C., Cox, K., Dungey, D. D., Jones, A., & Kim, A. Y.
Title (up) Artificial Light Increases Local Predator Abundance, Predation Rates, and Herbivory Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environmental Entomology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 48 Issue 6 Pages 1331–1339
Keywords Animals; Predation; Arthropods; Ecology
Abstract Human activity is rapidly increasing the radiance and geographic extent of artificial light at night (ALAN) leading to alterations in the development, behavior, and physiological state of many organisms. A limited number of community-scale studies investigating the effects of ALAN have allowed for spatial aggregation through positive phototaxis, the commonly observed phenomenon of arthropod movement toward light. We performed an open field study (without restricted arthropod access) to determine the effects of ALAN on local arthropod community composition, plant traits, and local herbivory and predation rates. We found strong positive phototaxis in 10 orders of arthropods, with increased (159% higher) overall arthropod abundance under ALAN compared to unlit controls. The arthropod community under ALAN was more diverse and contained a higher proportion of predaceous arthropods (15% vs 8%). Predation of immobilized flies occurred 3.6 times faster under ALAN; this effect was not observed during the day. Contrary to expectations, we also observed a 6% increase in herbivory under ALAN. Our results highlight the importance of open experimental field studies in determining community-level effects of ALAN.
Address Department of Entomology and Nematology, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA; mmcmunn(at)gmail.com
Corporate Author Thesis
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2725
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Author Duarte, C.; Quintanilla-Ahumada, D.; Anguita, C.; Manríquez, P.H.; Widdicombe, S.; Pulgar, J.; Silva-Rodriguez, E.A.; Miranda, C.; Manríquez, K.; Quijón, P.A.
Title (up) Artificial light pollution at night (ALAN) disrupts the distribution and circadian rhythm of a sandy beach isopod Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environmental Pollution Abbreviated Journal Environmental Pollution
Volume 248 Issue Pages 565-573
Keywords Animals; isopod; Tylos spinulosus; Chile; beaches; mesocosms
Abstract Coastal habitats, in particular sandy beaches, are becoming increasingly exposed to artificial light pollution at night (ALAN). Yet, only a few studies have this far assessed the effects of ALAN on the species inhabiting these ecosystems. In this study we assessed the effects of ALAN on Tylos spinulosus, a prominent wrack-consumer isopod living in sandy beaches of north-central Chile. This species burrows in the sand during daylight and emerges at night to migrate down-shore, so we argue it can be used as a model species for the study of ALAN effects on coastal nocturnal species. We assessed whether ALAN alters the distribution and locomotor activity of this isopod using a light system placed in upper shore sediments close to the edge of the dunes, mimicking light intensities measured near public lighting. The response of the isopods was compared to control transects located farther away and not exposed to artificial light. In parallel, we measured the isopods’ locomotor activity in the laboratory using actographs that recorded their movement within mesocosms simulating the beach surface. Measurements in the field indicated a clear reduction in isopod abundance near the source of the light and a restriction of their tidal distribution range, as compared to control transects. Meanwhile, the laboratory experiments showed that in mesocosms exposed to ALAN, isopods exhibited reduced activity and a circadian rhythm that was altered and even lost after a few days. Such changes with respect to control mesocosms with a natural day/night cycle suggest that the changes observed in the field were directly related to a disruption in the locomotor activity of the isopods. All together these results provide causal evidence of negative ALAN effects on this species, and call for further research on other nocturnal sandy beach species that might become increasingly affected by ALAN.
Address Departamento de Ecología y Biodiversidad, Facultad de Ciencias de la Vida, Universidad Andres Bello, Santiago, Chile;
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2228
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