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Author Pu, G.; Zeng, D.; Mo, L.; Liao, J.; Chen, X.; Qiu, S.; Lv, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Artificial light at night alter the impact of arsenic on microbial decomposers and leaf litter decomposition in streams Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety Abbreviated Journal Ecotoxicol Environ Saf  
  Volume in press Issue Pages 110014  
  Keywords Ecology; Microbes; Fungal communities and biodiversity; Illumina sequencing; Light pollution; Litter decomposition; Microbiological oxidation  
  Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN, also known as light pollution) has been proved to be a contributor to environmental change and a biodiversity threat worldwide, yet little is known about its potential interaction with different metal pollutants, such as arsenic (As), one of the largest threats to aquatic ecosystems. To narrow this gap, an indoor microcosm study was performed using an ALAN simulation device to examine whether ALAN exposure altered the impact of arsenic on plant litter decomposition and its associated fungi. Results revealed that microbial decomposers involved in the conversion of As(III) to As(V), and ALAN exposure enhanced this effect; ALAN or arsenic only exposure altered fungal community composition and the correlations between fungi species, as well as stimulated or inhibited litter decomposition, respectively. The negative effects of arsenic on the decomposition of Pterocarya stenoptera leaf litter was alleviated by ALAN resulting in the enhanced photodegradation of leaf litter lignin and microbiological oxidation of As(III) to As(V), the increased microbial biomass and CBH activity, as well as the enhanced correlations between CBH and litter decomposition rate. Overall, results expand our understanding of ALAN on environment and highlight the contribution of ALAN to the toxicity of arsenic in aquatic ecosystems.  
  Address School of Pharmacy and Biological Sciences, Weifang Medical University, Weifang, 261053, China. Electronic address: njandgl@163.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0147-6513 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31810590 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2777  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Pu, G.; Zeng, D.; Mo, L.; Liao, J.; Chen, X.; Qiu, S.; Lv, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Artificial light at night alter the impact of arsenic on microbial decomposers and leaf litter decomposition in streams Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety Abbreviated Journal Ecotoxicol Environ Saf  
  Volume 191 Issue Pages 110014  
  Keywords Ecology; Arsenic/*metabolism/toxicity; Biodiversity; Biomass; *Environmental Pollution; Fungi/drug effects/metabolism/radiation effects; *Light; Lignin/metabolism; Plant Leaves/metabolism; Rivers/*chemistry; Water Pollutants, Chemical/*metabolism/toxicity; Fungal communities and biodiversity; Illumina sequencing; Light pollution; Litter decomposition; Microbiological oxidation  
  Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN, also known as light pollution) has been proved to be a contributor to environmental change and a biodiversity threat worldwide, yet little is known about its potential interaction with different metal pollutants, such as arsenic (As), one of the largest threats to aquatic ecosystems. To narrow this gap, an indoor microcosm study was performed using an ALAN simulation device to examine whether ALAN exposure altered the impact of arsenic on plant litter decomposition and its associated fungi. Results revealed that microbial decomposers involved in the conversion of As(III) to As(V), and ALAN exposure enhanced this effect; ALAN or arsenic only exposure altered fungal community composition and the correlations between fungi species, as well as stimulated or inhibited litter decomposition, respectively. The negative effects of arsenic on the decomposition of Pterocarya stenoptera leaf litter was alleviated by ALAN resulting in the enhanced photodegradation of leaf litter lignin and microbiological oxidation of As(III) to As(V), the increased microbial biomass and CBH activity, as well as the enhanced correlations between CBH and litter decomposition rate. Overall, results expand our understanding of ALAN on environment and highlight the contribution of ALAN to the toxicity of arsenic in aquatic ecosystems.  
  Address School of Pharmacy and Biological Sciences, Weifang Medical University, Weifang, 261053, China; njandgl ( at ) 163.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0147-6513 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31810590 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3370  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Willmott, N.J.; Henneken, J.; Selleck, C.J.; Jones, T.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Artificial light at night alters life history in a nocturnal orb-web spider Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication PeerJ Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 6 Issue Pages e5599  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract The prevalence of artificial light at night (ALAN) is increasing rapidly around the world. The potential physiological costs of this night lighting are often evident in life history shifts. We investigated the effects of chronic night-time exposure to ecologically relevant levels of LED lighting on the life history traits of the nocturnal Australian garden orb-web spider (Eriophora biapicata). We reared spiders under a 12-h day and either a 12-h natural darkness (∼0 lux) or a 12-h dim light (∼20 lux) night and assessed juvenile development, growth and mortality, and adult reproductive success and survival. We found that exposure to ALAN accelerated juvenile development, resulting in spiders progressing through fewer moults, and maturing earlier and at a smaller size. There was a significant increase in daily juvenile mortality for spiders reared under 20 lux, but the earlier maturation resulted in a comparable number of 0 lux and 20 lux spiders reaching maturity. Exposure to ALAN also considerably reduced the number of eggs produced by females, and this was largely associated with ALAN-induced reductions in body size. Despite previous observations of increased fitness for some orb-web spiders in urban areas and near night lighting, it appears that exposure to artificial night lighting may lead to considerable developmental costs. Future research will need to consider the detrimental effects of ALAN combined with foraging benefits when studying nocturnal insectivores that forage around artificial lights.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2167-8359 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2023  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Fyie, L.R.; Gardiner, M.M.; Meuti, M.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Artificial light at night alters the seasonal responses of biting mosquitoes Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Journal of Insect Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Insect Physiol  
  Volume in press Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Animals; Culex pipiens; Light pollution; Northern house mosquito; diapause; urbanization  
  Abstract Urban light pollution caused by artificial light at night (ALAN) profoundly affects the ecology, behavior, and physiology of plants and animals. Further, this widespread environmental pollutant has the potential to negatively impact human and animal health by changing the seasonal dynamics of disease-transmitting insects. In response to short days, females of the Northern house mosquito enter an overwintering dormancy, or diapause. While in diapause, female mosquitoes divert energy away from reproduction, cease blood-feeding, and no longer transmit disease. We demonstrate that exposure to dim ALAN ( approximately 4 lux) causes female mosquitoes to avert diapause and become reproductively active, as these females acquired less fat content, developed larger egg follicles, imbibed vertebrate blood, and produced viable eggs and larvae. Our findings suggest that mosquitoes in highly light-polluted areas such as cities may be actively reproducing and biting later in the season, thereby extending the period of disease risk for urban residents. Our results suggest that ALAN should be considered when modeling mosquito abundance, disease risk, and when deciding how long mosquito surveillance and control should persist in temperate regions.  
  Address The Ohio State University, Department of Entomology, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-1910 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:33482172 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3293  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lynn, K.D.; Tummon Flynn, P.; Manriquez, K.; Manriquez, P.H.; Pulgar, J.; Duarte, C.; Quijon, P.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Artificial light at night alters the settlement of acorn barnacles on a man-made habitat in Atlantic Canada Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Marine Pollution Bulletin Abbreviated Journal Mar Pollut Bull  
  Volume 163 Issue Pages 111928  
  Keywords Animals; ALAN plates; Atlantic Canada; Semibalanus balanoides; Settlement  
  Abstract Human growth has caused an unprecedented increase in artificial light at night (ALAN). In coastal habitats, many species rely on day/night cycles to regulate various aspects of their life history and these cycles can be altered by this stressor. This study assessed the influence of ALAN on the early (cyprid) and late (spat) settlement stages of the acorn barnacle Semibalanus balanoides, a species widely distributed in natural and man-made coastal habitats of the North Atlantic. A newly designed settlement plate, originally for studies in rocky intertidal habitats in the southeast Pacific, was adapted to measure settlement rates on man-made habitats -wharf seawalls- located in Atlantic Canada. Plates equipped with a small LED diode powered by an internal battery (ALAN plates) were used to quantify settlement rates in comparison to plates lacking a light source (controls). These plates were deployed for 6 d in the mid-intertidal levels, where adult barnacles were readily visible. ALAN and control plates collected large number of settlers and showed to be suitable for this type of man-made habitats. The number of early settlers (cyprids) did not differ between plates but the number of late settlers (spat) was significantly lower in ALAN plates than in controls. These results suggest that light pollution has little influence on the early stages of the acorn barnacle settlement but is clearly detrimental to its late stages. As barnacles dominate in many natural and man-made hard substrates, it is likely that ALAN also has indirect effects on community structure.  
  Address Department of Biology, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, Canada. Electronic address: pquijon@upei.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0025-326X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:33418341 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3238  
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