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Author Jakubowski, P.
Title (up) Artificial light sources as light pollutant of humans melatonin suppression Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Photonics Letters of Poland Abbreviated Journal Photon.Lett.PL
Volume 11 Issue 3 Pages 78
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Blue light emitted by LEDs might influence thenatural biological rhythm of a human being, whichcan beconsidered as environment pollution.In this paper the effect of the latest commercially available LEDs on melatonin suppression index (MSI) was analyzed. The research was based on spectral power distributionof a given LED(SPD) and melatonin suppression functionin reference to melatonin suppression under daylight (illuminant D65). The resultsof calculations show astrong correlation between CCT and MSI;however,MSI factor might vary for different LEDs with the same CCT.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2080-2242 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2693
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Author Barghini, A.; de Medeiros, B.A.S.
Title (up) Artificial lighting as a vector attractant and cause of disease diffusion Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Environmental Health Perspectives Abbreviated Journal Environ Health Perspect
Volume 118 Issue 11 Pages 1503-1506
Keywords Human Health
Abstract BACKGROUND: Traditionally, epidemiologists have considered electrification to be a positive factor. In fact, electrification and plumbing are typical initiatives that represent the integration of an isolated population into modern society, ensuring the control of pathogens and promoting public health. Nonetheless, electrification is always accompanied by night lighting that attracts insect vectors and changes people's behavior. Although this may lead to new modes of infection and increased transmission of insect-borne diseases, epidemiologists rarely consider the role of night lighting in their surveys. OBJECTIVE: We reviewed the epidemiological evidence concerning the role of lighting in the spread of vector-borne diseases to encourage other researchers to consider it in future studies. DISCUSSION: We present three infectious vector-borne diseases-Chagas, leishmaniasis, and malaria-and discuss evidence that suggests that the use of artificial lighting results in behavioral changes among human populations and changes in the prevalence of vector species and in the modes of transmission. CONCLUSION: Despite a surprising lack of studies, existing evidence supports our hypothesis that artificial lighting leads to a higher risk of infection from vector-borne diseases. We believe that this is related not only to the simple attraction of traditional vectors to light sources but also to changes in the behavior of both humans and insects that result in new modes of disease transmission. Considering the ongoing expansion of night lighting in developing countries, additional research on this subject is urgently needed.
Address Laboratorio de Estudos Evolutivos Humanos, Departamento de Genetica e Biologia Evolutiva, Instituto de Biociencias, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brasil. barghini@iee.usp.br
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0091-6765 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:20675268; PMCID:PMC2974685 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2184
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Author Sullivan, S.M.P.; Hossler, K.; Meyer, L.A.
Title (up) Artificial lighting at night alters aquatic-riparian invertebrate food webs Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Ecological Applications : a Publication of the Ecological Society of America Abbreviated Journal Ecol Appl
Volume 29 Issue 1 Pages e01821
Keywords Ecology; Animals
Abstract Artificial lighting at night (ALAN) is a global phenomenon that can be detrimental to organisms at individual and population levels, yet potential consequences for communities and ecosystem functions are less resolved. Riparian systems may be particularly vulnerable to ALAN. We investigated the impacts of ALAN on invertebrate community composition and food web characteristics for linked aquatic-terrestrial ecosystems. We focused on food chain length (FCL), a central property of ecological communities that can influence their structure, function, and stability; and the contribution of aquatically derived energy (i.e., nutritional subsidies originating from stream periphyton). We collected terrestrial arthropods and emergent aquatic insects from a suite of stream and wetland sites in Columbus, Ohio, USA. Stable isotopes of carbon ((13) C) and nitrogen ((15) N) were used to infer FCL and contribution of aquatically derived energy. We found that moderate-to-high levels of ALAN altered invertebrate community composition, favoring primarily predators and detritivores. Impacts of ALAN, however, were very taxon specific as illustrated, for example, by the negative impact of ALAN on the abundance of orb-web spiders belonging to the families Tetragnathidae and Araneidae: key invertebrate riparian predators. Most notably, we observed decreases in both invertebrate FCL and reliance on aquatically derived energy under ALAN (although aquatic energetic contributions appeared to increase again at higher levels of ALAN), in addition to shifts in the timing of reciprocal nutritional subsidies. Our study demonstrates that ALAN can alter the flows of energy between aquatic and terrestrial systems, thereby representing an environmental perturbation that can cross ecosystem boundaries. Given projections for global increases in ALAN, both in terms of coverage and intensity, these results have broad implications for stream ecosystem structure and function.
Address Schiermeier Olentangy River Wetland Research Park, School of Environment & Natural Resources, The Ohio State University, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, Ohio, 43210, USA
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1051-0761 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30566269 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2150
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Author Zapata, M.J.; Sullivan, S.M.P.; Gray, S.M.
Title (up) Artificial Lighting at Night in Estuaries—Implications from Individuals to Ecosystems Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Estuaries and Coasts Abbreviated Journal
Volume In press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals; Ecology
Abstract Artificial lighting at night (ALAN) produced by urban, industrial, and roadway lighting, as well as other sources, has dramatically increased in recent decades, especially in coastal environments that support dense human populations. Artificial “lightscapes” are characterized by distinct spatial, temporal, and spectral patterns that can alter natural patterns of light and dark with consequences across levels of biological organization. At the individual level, ALAN can elicit a suite of physiological and behavioral responses associated with light-mediated processes such as diel activity patterns and predator-prey interactions. ALAN has also been shown to modify community composition and trophic structure, with implications for ecosystem-level processes including primary productivity, nutrient cycling, and the energetic linkages between aquatic and terrestrial systems. Here, we review the state of the science relative to the impacts of ALAN on estuaries, which is an important step in assessing the long-term sustainability of coastal regions. We first consider how multiple properties of ALAN (e.g., intensity and spectral content) influence the interaction between physiology and behavior of individual estuarine biota (drawing from studies on invertebrates, fishes, and birds). Second, we link individual- to community- and ecosystem-level responses, with a focus on the impacts of ALAN on food webs and implications for estuarine ecosystem functions. Coastal aquatic communities and ecosystems have been identified as a key priority for ALAN research, and a cohesive research framework will be critical for understanding and mitigating ecological consequences.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2116
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Author Bhardwaj, M.; Soanes, K.; Lahoz-Monfort, J.J.; Lumsden, L.F.; van der Ree, R.
Title (up) Artificial lighting reduces the effectiveness of wildlife-crossing structures for insectivorous bats Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of Environmental Management Abbreviated Journal Journal of Environmental Management
Volume 262 Issue Pages 110313
Keywords Animals
Abstract In an attempt to improve cost-effectiveness, it has become increasingly popular to adapt wildlife crossing structures to enable people to also use them for safe passage across roads. However, the required needs of humans and wildlife may conflict, resulting in a structure that does not actually provide the perceived improvement in cost-effectiveness, but instead a reduction in conservation benefits. For example, lighting within crossing structures for human safety at night may reduce use of the structure by nocturnal wildlife, thus contributing to barrier and mortality effects of roads rather than mitigating them.

In this study, we experimentally evaluated the impact of artificial light at night on the rate of use of wildlife crossing structures, specifically underpasses, by ten insectivorous bat species groups in south-eastern Australia. We monitored bat activity before, during and after artificially lighting the underpasses. We found that bats tended to avoided lit underpasses, and only one species consistently showed attraction to the light. Artificial light at night in underpasses hypothetically increases the vulnerability of bats to road-mortality or to the barrier effect of roads. The most likely outcomes of lighting underpasses were 1. an increase in crossing rate above the freeway and a decrease under the underpasses, or 2. a reduction in crossing rate both above freeways and under the underpasses, when structures were lit. Our results corroborate those of studies on terrestrial mammals, and thus we recommend that underpasses intended to facilitate the movement of wildlife across roads should not be lit.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0301-4797 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2846
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