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Author Farkas, T.D.; Kiràly, T.; Pardy, T.; Rang, T.; Rang, G.
Title (up) Application of power line communication technology in street lighting control Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication International Journal of Design & Nature and Ecodynamics Abbreviated Journal Int. J. DNE
Volume 13 Issue 2 Pages 176-186
Keywords Lighting
Abstract Rapidly increasing usage of telecommunication systems causes new transmission technologies and networks to emerge. Not only the efficiency, reliability and accessibility of the network are important, but also the economic issues. One cost-effective solution could be power line communication (PLC) technology, which transmits data using the existing electricity infrastructure. The application of this communication technique is an attractive and innovative solution for the realization of smart cities and smart homes. With intelligent control networks, energy savings can be optimized and the operating as well as maintenance costs can be reduced. Since outdoor lighting systems are the major consumers of electricity, to create a modern, energy-efficient city, intelligent street lighting control is needed. This paper provides an overview of power line communication principles including the theoretical background of data communication, modulation techniques, channel access methods, protocols, disturbances and noises. Furthermore, in order to highlight the benefits of a PLC-based street lighting control system, a pilot project will be presented.
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1755-7437 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2091
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Author Zhao,; Zhou,; Li,; Cao,; He,; Yu,; Li,; Elvidge,; Cheng,; Zhou,
Title (up) Applications of Satellite Remote Sensing of Nighttime Light Observations: Advances, Challenges, and Perspectives Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 11 Issue 17 Pages 1971
Keywords Remote Sensing; Review
Abstract Nighttime light observations from remote sensing provide us with a timely and spatially explicit measure of human activities, and therefore enable a host of applications such as tracking urbanization and socioeconomic dynamics, evaluating armed conflicts and disasters, investigating fisheries, assessing greenhouse gas emissions and energy use, and analyzing light pollution and health effects. The new and improved sensors, algorithms, and products for nighttime lights, in association with other Earth observations and ancillary data (e.g., geo-located big data), together offer great potential for a deep understanding of human activities and related environmental consequences in a changing world. This paper reviews the advances of nighttime light sensors and products and examines the contributions of nighttime light remote sensing to perceiving the changing world from two aspects (i.e., human activities and environmental changes). Based on the historical review of the advances in nighttime light remote sensing, we summarize the challenges in current nighttime light remote sensing research and propose four strategic directions, including: Improving nighttime light data; developing a long time series of consistent nighttime light data; integrating nighttime light observations with other data and knowledge; and promoting multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary analyses of nighttime light observations.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2677
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Author Kocifaj, M.; Kómar, L.; Lamphar, H.; Wallner, S.
Title (up) Are population-based models advantageous in estimating the lumen outputs from light-pollution sources? Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society: Letters Abbreviated Journal
Volume 496 Issue 1 Pages L138-L141
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract The total lumen output (TLO) from ground-based artificial light sources is required in a wide range of light-pollution models currently in use. No realistic assessment of diffuse light levels in the nocturnal environment is possible if the information on TLO is missing. Traditional approaches to skyglow modelling, if no lighting inventory is available, foresee to estimate TLO based on population and average amount of lumens per capita. However, we show in this letter that a model based on the area of artificially lit surfaces can reduce uncertainties in estimating TLO by 25 per cent for compact urban areas of defined centres and autonomous character and even 50 per cent for diffuse cities with small satellite towns interacting closely with the main city. The new model could be of great significance to the community of light-pollution researchers, especially astronomers, physicists, and modellers who use TLO routinely in light-pollution characterization.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1745-3925 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3181
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Author Shi, L.; He, H.; Yang, G.; Huang, H.; Vasseur, L.; You, M.
Title (up) Are Yellow Sticky Cards and Light Traps Effective on Tea Green Leafhoppers and Their Predators in Chinese Tea Plantations? Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Insects Abbreviated Journal Insects
Volume 12 Issue 1 Pages
Keywords Animals; Empoasca onukii; light traps; tea plantations; yellow sticky cards
Abstract In Chinese tea plantations, yellow sticky cards and light traps are increasingly used to control insect pests, especially the tea green leafhopper Empoasca onukii. In this study, a 16-week open-field experiment with daily weather monitoring was designed to test the responses of tea green leafhopper, parasitoids and spiders to yellow sticky cards and three light traps with different wavelengths (covered with sticky cards). An exclosure experiment was also designed to further test the influence of the three light systems (without sticky card) on the same species. The results showed that all three light emitting diode (LED) light traps (white, green and yellow) and yellow sticky cards attracted many more E. onukii male adults than females during the course of the open field experiment, with less than 25% of trapped adults being females. Parasitoids and spiders were also attracted by these systems. Weather variables, especially rainfall, influenced the trapping efficiency. In the exclosure experiment, the population of leafhoppers in the yellow sticky card treatment did not decline significantly, but the number of spiders significantly decreased. The green and white light treatments without sticky cards showed a significant control of E. onukii and no obvious harm to spiders. These results suggest that yellow sticky cards and light traps have limited capacity to control tea green leafhoppers. However, light, especially green light, may be a promising population control measure for tea green leafhoppers, not as killing agents in the traps, but rather as a behavioral control system.
Address Key Laboratory of Integrated Pest Management for Fujian-Taiwan Crops, Ministry of Agriculture, Fuzhou 350002, China
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2075-4450 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:33383612 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3240
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Author Russo, D.; Cosentino, F.; Festa, F.; De Benedetta, F.; Pejic, B.; Cerretti, P.; Ancillotto, L.
Title (up) Artificial illumination near rivers may alter bat-insect trophic interactions Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987) Abbreviated Journal Environ Pollut
Volume 252 Issue Pt B Pages 1671-1677
Keywords Animals
Abstract Artificial illumination at night represents an increasingly concerning threat to ecosystems worldwide, altering persistence, behaviour, physiology and fitness of many organisms and their mutual interactions, in the long-term affecting ecosystem functioning. Bats are very sensitive to artificial light at night because they are obligate nocturnal and feed on insects which are often also responsive to lights. Here we tested the effects of LED lighting on prey-predator interactions at riverine ecosystems, using bats and their insect prey as models, and compared bat and insect reactions in terms of bat activity and prey insect abundance and diversity, respectively, on artificially lit vs. unlit nights. Artificial light influenced both insect and bat assemblages in taxon-specific directions: insect abundances increased at lit sites, particularly due to an increase in small dipterans near the light source. Composition of insect assemblages also differed significantly between lit and unlit sites. Total bat activity declined at lit sites, but this change was mainly due to the response of the most abundant species, Myotis daubentonii, while opportunistic species showed no reaction or even an opposite pattern (Pipistrellus kuhlii). We show that artificial lighting along rivers may affect trophic interactions between bats and insects, resulting in a profound alteration of community structure and dynamics.
Address Wildlife Research Unit, Dipartimento di Agraria, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, via Universita, 100, 80055, Portici, Italy
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31284209 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2572
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