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Author Agnew, J.; Gillespie, T.W.; Gonzalez, J.; Min, B.
Title (up) Baghdad Nights: Evaluating the US Military ‘Surge’ Using Nighttime Light Signatures Type Journal Article
Year 2008 Publication Environment and Planning A Abbreviated Journal Environ Plan A
Volume 40 Issue 10 Pages 2285-2295
Keywords Remote Sensing; Commentary
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0308-518X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2028
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Author Obayashi, K.; Yamagami, Y.; Kurumatani, N.; Saeki, K.
Title (up) Bedroom lighting environment and incident diabetes mellitus: a longitudinal study of the HEIJO-KYO cohort Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Sleep Medicine
Volume 65 Issue Pages 1-3
Keywords Human Health; Metabolic disorders; diabetes; geriatrics
Abstract Objectives

Light information received by the brain influences human circadian timing and metabolism; low-level light at night (LAN) significantly increased body mass and led to prediabetes in mice. We hypothesized that LAN exposure increases the diabetes risk in humans. The aim of the present study was to evaluate a longitudinal association between LAN exposure and the incidence of diabetes in a general population.

Methods

In our prospective cohort study, bedroom light intensity was measured at 1-min intervals in 678 elderly participants without diabetes at baseline. The average light intensity recorded between bedtimes and rise times over two consecutive nights was used in the analysis.

Results

During follow-up (median, 42 months), 19 of the 678 participants (mean age, 70.6 years) developed diabetes. Poisson regression models revealed that the incidence rate for diabetes was significantly higher in the LAN group (average ≥5 lux, N = 128) than the dark group (average <5 lux, N = 550) (incidence rate ratio, 3.74; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.55–9.05; p=0.003). Further propensity score adjustments in relation to LAN produced consistent results (incidence rate ratio, 3.19; 95% CI, 1.38–7.35; p=0.007). When the cut-off value of LAN was decreased to 3 lux, the relationship remained significant (incidence rate ratio 2.74; 95% CI, 1.19–6.33; p=0.018).

Conclusions

Our findings suggest that LAN exposure increases the incidence of diabetes in a general elderly population. Further research involving a large cohort with new-onset diabetes is warranted to elucidate these findings.
Address Department of Epidemiology, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, 840 Shijocho, Kashiharashi, Nara, 634-8521, Japan; obayashi(at)naramed-u.ac.jp
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1389-9457 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2605
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Author Marder, M.
Title (up) Being Dumped Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environmental Humanities Abbreviated Journal
Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages 180-193
Keywords Commentary
Abstract In this article, Michael Marder interprets the “toxic flood” we are living or dying through as a global dump. On his reading, multiple levels of existence—from the psychic to the physiological, from the environmental-elemental to the planetary—are being converted into a dump, a massive and still growing hodgepodge of industrial and consumer by-products and emissions; shards of metaphysical ideas and theological dreams; radioactive materials; light, sound, and other modes of sensory pollution; pesticides and herbicides; and so forth. Toxicity targets our bodily tissues, senses, and minds, not to mention our worlds, without individuating us in this targeting, as indifferent and random as the global dump that nourishes it. Disrupting metabolism at every scrambled register of existence, it waxes into what Marder calls “ontological toxicity,” the mangled parts of the dump that do not pass through and out of being and, in not passing, warrant the annihilation, the rapid passing away, of all else. In an ontologically toxic state, the meaning of being is being dumped.
Address
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Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2503
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Author Jechow, A.; Kyba, C.; Hölker, F.
Title (up) Beyond All-Sky: Assessing Ecological Light Pollution Using Multi-Spectral Full-Sphere Fisheye Lens Imaging Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Imaging Abbreviated Journal J. Imaging
Volume 5 Issue 4 Pages 46
Keywords Instrumentation; Skyglow
Abstract Artificial light at night is a novel anthropogenic stressor. The resulting ecological light pollution affects a wide breadth of biological systems on many spatio-temporal scales, from individual organisms to communities and ecosystems. However, a widely-applicable measurement method for nocturnal light providing spatially resolved full-spectrum radiance over the full solid angle is still missing. Here, we explain the first step to fill this gap, by using a commercial digital camera with a fisheye lens to acquire vertical plane multi-spectral (RGB) images covering the full solid angle. We explain the technical and practical procedure and software to process luminance and correlated color temperature maps and derive illuminance. We discuss advantages and limitations and present data from different night-time lighting situations. The method provides a comprehensive way to characterize nocturnal light in the context of ecological light pollution. It is affordable, fast, mobile, robust, and widely-applicable by non-experts for field work.
Address
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2313-433X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2327
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Author Spitschan, M.; Cajochen, C.
Title (up) Binocular facilitation in light-mediated melatonin suppression? Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Pineal Research Abbreviated Journal J Pineal Res
Volume 67 Issue 4 Pages e12602
Keywords Human Health; Vision; melatonin suppression; monocular; binocular
Abstract Astronomers and pilots have known for a long time that closing one eye can preserve vision in that eye while going from dark to light and back. Recently, it was reported that viewing a smartphone monocularly in an otherwise dark room can lead to transient, but strong reductions in retinal sensitivity in that eye (Alim-Marvasti, Bi, Mahroo, Barbur, & Plant, 2016). But seeing detail is not the only function that is mediated by the retina. Here, we address the question whether light exposure to one eye only (monocular) has tangible effects on the suppression of melatonin by light, relative to both eyes open (binocular).
Address Transfaculty Research Platform Molecular and Cognitive Neurosciences, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-3098 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31361918 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2595
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