|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Marder, M.
Title (up) Being Dumped Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environmental Humanities Abbreviated Journal
Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages 180-193
Keywords Commentary
Abstract In this article, Michael Marder interprets the “toxic flood” we are living or dying through as a global dump. On his reading, multiple levels of existence—from the psychic to the physiological, from the environmental-elemental to the planetary—are being converted into a dump, a massive and still growing hodgepodge of industrial and consumer by-products and emissions; shards of metaphysical ideas and theological dreams; radioactive materials; light, sound, and other modes of sensory pollution; pesticides and herbicides; and so forth. Toxicity targets our bodily tissues, senses, and minds, not to mention our worlds, without individuating us in this targeting, as indifferent and random as the global dump that nourishes it. Disrupting metabolism at every scrambled register of existence, it waxes into what Marder calls “ontological toxicity,” the mangled parts of the dump that do not pass through and out of being and, in not passing, warrant the annihilation, the rapid passing away, of all else. In an ontologically toxic state, the meaning of being is being dumped.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2503
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Jechow, A.; Kyba, C.; Hölker, F.
Title (up) Beyond All-Sky: Assessing Ecological Light Pollution Using Multi-Spectral Full-Sphere Fisheye Lens Imaging Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Imaging Abbreviated Journal J. Imaging
Volume 5 Issue 4 Pages 46
Keywords Instrumentation; Skyglow
Abstract Artificial light at night is a novel anthropogenic stressor. The resulting ecological light pollution affects a wide breadth of biological systems on many spatio-temporal scales, from individual organisms to communities and ecosystems. However, a widely-applicable measurement method for nocturnal light providing spatially resolved full-spectrum radiance over the full solid angle is still missing. Here, we explain the first step to fill this gap, by using a commercial digital camera with a fisheye lens to acquire vertical plane multi-spectral (RGB) images covering the full solid angle. We explain the technical and practical procedure and software to process luminance and correlated color temperature maps and derive illuminance. We discuss advantages and limitations and present data from different night-time lighting situations. The method provides a comprehensive way to characterize nocturnal light in the context of ecological light pollution. It is affordable, fast, mobile, robust, and widely-applicable by non-experts for field work.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2313-433X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2327
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Spitschan, M.; Cajochen, C.
Title (up) Binocular facilitation in light-mediated melatonin suppression? Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Pineal Research Abbreviated Journal J Pineal Res
Volume 67 Issue 4 Pages e12602
Keywords Human Health; Vision; melatonin suppression; monocular; binocular
Abstract Astronomers and pilots have known for a long time that closing one eye can preserve vision in that eye while going from dark to light and back. Recently, it was reported that viewing a smartphone monocularly in an otherwise dark room can lead to transient, but strong reductions in retinal sensitivity in that eye (Alim-Marvasti, Bi, Mahroo, Barbur, & Plant, 2016). But seeing detail is not the only function that is mediated by the retina. Here, we address the question whether light exposure to one eye only (monocular) has tangible effects on the suppression of melatonin by light, relative to both eyes open (binocular).
Address Transfaculty Research Platform Molecular and Cognitive Neurosciences, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-3098 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31361918 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2595
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Dutcher, W.
Title (up) Bird Notes from Long Island, N. Y Type Journal Article
Year 1884 Publication The Auk Abbreviated Journal The Auk
Volume 1 Issue 2 Pages 174-179
Keywords Animals
Abstract For the purpose of determining the date of migration, the species migrating, and the numbers that are destroyed by striking a light house during a spring and fall migration, I have for the past two years received all the birds killed by flying against Fire Island Light.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0004-8038 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2290
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bará, S.
Title (up) Black-body luminance and magnitudes per square arcsecond in the Johnson-Cousins BVR photometric bands Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Photonics Letters of Poland Abbreviated Journal Photon. Lett. Pl.
Volume 11 Issue 3 Pages 63
Keywords Skyglow; night sky brightness; luminance; photometric
Abstract A relevant amount of light pollution studies deal with the unwanted visual effects of artificial light at night, including the anthropogenic luminance of the sky that hinders the observation of the celestial bodies which are a main target of ground-based astrophysical research, and a key asset of the intangible heritage of humankind. Most quantitative measurements and numerical models, however, evaluate the anthropogenic sky radiance in any of the standard Johnson-Cousins UBVRI photometric bands, generally in the V one. Since the Johnson-Cousins V band is not identical with the visual CIE V-lambda used to assess luminance, the conversion between these two photometric systems turns out to be spectrum-dependent. Given its interest for practical applications, in this Letter we provide the framework to perform this conversion and the transformation constants for black-body spectra of different absolute temperatures.
Address Dept. Física Aplicada, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Photonics Society of Poland Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2080-2242 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2685
Permanent link to this record