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Author Walker, W.H. 2nd; Borniger, J.C.; Gaudier-Diaz, M.M.; Hecmarie Melendez-Fernandez, O.; Pascoe, J.L.; Courtney DeVries, A.; Nelson, R.J.
Title (up) Acute exposure to low-level light at night is sufficient to induce neurological changes and depressive-like behavior Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Molecular Psychiatry Abbreviated Journal Mol Psychiatry
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Human health; physiology; brain
Abstract The advent and wide-spread adoption of electric lighting over the past century has profoundly affected the circadian organization of physiology and behavior for many individuals in industrialized nations; electric lighting in homes, work environments, and public areas have extended daytime activities into the evening, thus, increasing night-time exposure to light. Although initially assumed to be innocuous, chronic exposure to light at night (LAN) is now associated with increased incidence of cancer, metabolic disorders, and affective problems in humans. However, little is known about potential acute effects of LAN. To determine whether acute exposure to low-level LAN alters brain function, adult male, and female mice were housed in either light days and dark nights (LD; 14 h of 150 lux:10 h of 0 lux) or light days and low level light at night (LAN; 14 h of 150 lux:10 h of 5 lux). Mice exposed to LAN on three consecutive nights increased depressive-like responses compared to mice housed in dark nights. In addition, female mice exposed to LAN increased central tendency in the open field. LAN was associated with reduced hippocampal vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) in both male and female mice, as well as increased VEGFR1 and interleukin-1beta mRNA expression in females, and reduced brain derived neurotrophic factor mRNA in males. Further, LAN significantly altered circadian rhythms (activity and temperature) and circadian gene expression in female and male mice, respectively. Altogether, this study demonstrates that acute exposure to LAN alters brain physiology and can be detrimental to well-being in otherwise healthy individuals.
Address Department of Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, 26506, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Nature Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1359-4184 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31138889 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2509
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Author Halfwerk, W.; Blaas, M.; Kramer, L.; Hijner, N.; Trillo, P.A.; Bernal, X.E.; Page, R.A.; Goutte, S.; Ryan, M.J.; Ellers, J.
Title (up) Adaptive changes in sexual signalling in response to urbanization Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Nature Ecology & Evolution Abbreviated Journal Nat Ecol Evol
Volume 3 Issue Pages 374-380
Keywords Animals
Abstract Urbanization can cause species to adjust their sexual displays, because the effectiveness of mating signals is influenced by environmental conditions. Despite many examples that show that mating signals in urban conditions differ from those in rural conditions, we do not know whether these differences provide a combined reproductive and survival benefit to the urban phenotype. Here we show that male tungara frogs have increased the conspicuousness of their calls, which is under strong sexual and natural selection by signal receivers, as an adaptive response to city life. The urban phenotype consequently attracts more females than the forest phenotype, while avoiding the costs that are imposed by eavesdropping bats and midges, which we show are rare in urban areas. Finally, we show in a translocation experiment that urban frogs can reduce risk of predation and parasitism when moved to the forest, but that forest frogs do not increase their sexual attractiveness when moved to the city. Our findings thus reveal that urbanization can rapidly drive adaptive signal change via changes in both natural and sexual selection pressures.
Address Department of Ecological Science, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2397-334X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30532046 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2136
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Author Kim, K.-N.; Huang, Q.-Y.; Lei, C.-L.
Title (up) Advances in insect phototaxis and application to pest management: A review Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Pest Management Science Abbreviated Journal Pest Manag Sci
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Review; Animals
Abstract Many insects, especially nocturnal insects, exhibit positive phototaxis to artificial lights. Many light traps are currently used to monitor and manage insect pest populations, with light traps playing a crucial role in physical pest control. Efficient use of light traps to attract target insect pests becomes an important topic in application of integrated pest management (IPM). Phototactic responses of insects vary among species, light characteristics and the physiological status of the insects. In addition, light can cause several biological responses, including biochemical, physiological, molecular and fitness changes in insects. In this review, we discuss several hypotheses on insect phototaxis, affecting factors on insect phototaxis, insect sensitive wavelengths, biological responses of insects to light and countermeasures for conserving beneficial insects and increasing trapping effect. Additionally, we provide information on the different sensitivities to wavelengths causing positive phototactic behavior on more than 70 insect pest and beneficial insect species. The use of advanced light traps equipped with superior light sources, such as light emitting diodes (LEDs), will make physical pest control in IPM more efficient. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Address Hubei Insect Resources Utilization and Sustainable Pest Management Key Laboratory, College of Plant Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, Hubei 430070, China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1526-498X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31251458 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2574
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Author Bennett, M.M.; Smith, L.C.
Title (up) Advances in using multitemporal night-time lights satellite imagery to detect, estimate, and monitor socioeconomic dynamics Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment
Volume 192 Issue Pages 176-197
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Since the late 1990s, remotely sensed night-time lights (NTL) satellite imagery has been shown to correlate with socioeconomic parameters including urbanization, economic activity, and population. More recent research demonstrates that multitemporal NTL data can serve as a reliable proxy for change over time in these variables whether they are increasing or decreasing. Time series analysis of NTL data is especially valuable for detecting, estimating, and monitoring socioeconomic dynamics in countries and subnational regions where reliable official statistics may be lacking. Until 2012, multitemporal NTL imagery came primarily from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program – Operational Linescan System (DMSP-OLS), for which digital imagery is available from 1992 to 2013. In October 2011, the launch of NASA/NOAA's Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership satellite, whose Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) sensor has a Day/Night Band (DNB) specifically designed for capturing radiance from the Earth at night, marked the start of a new era in NTL data collection and applications. In light of these advances, this paper reviews progress in using multitemporal DMSP-OLS and VIIRS imagery to analyze urbanization, economic, and population dynamics across a range of geographic scales. An overview of data corrections and processing for comparison of multitemporal NTL imagery is provided, followed by a meta-analysis and integrative synthesis of these studies. Figures are included that visualize the capabilities of DMSP-OLS and VIIRS to capture socioeconomic change in the post-Soviet Russian Far East and war-torn Syria, respectively. Finally, future directions for NTL research are suggested, particularly in the areas of determining the fundamental causes of observed light and in leveraging VIIRS' superior sensitivity and spatial and radiometric resolution.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2024
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Author Kennard, D.C.; Chamberlin, V.D.
Title (up) All-night Light for Layers Type Report
Year 1931 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Bulletin 476 Issue Pages
Keywords Animals
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Ohio Agricultural Experiment Station Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2392
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