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Author Horton, K.G.; Nilsson, C.; Van Doren, B.M.; La Sorte, F.A.; Dokter, A.M.; Farnsworth, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Bright lights in the big cities: migratory birds’ exposure to artificial light Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment Abbreviated Journal Front Ecol Environ  
  Volume 17 Issue 4 Pages 209-214  
  Keywords Animals; Birds; migratory birds  
  Abstract Many species of migratory birds have evolved the ability to migrate at night, and the recent and rapid expansion of artificial light at night has markedly altered the nighttime sky through which they travel. Migrating birds regularly pass through heavily illuminated landscapes, and bright lights affect avian orientation. But risks to migrating birds from artificial light are not spatially or temporally uniform, representing a challenge for mitigating potential hazards and developing action plans to catalog risks at continental scales. We leveraged over two decades of remote‐sensing data collected by weather surveillance radar and satellite‐based sensors to identify locations and times of year when the highest numbers of migrating birds are exposed to light pollution in the contiguous US. Our continental‐scale quantification of light exposure provides a novel opportunity for dynamic and targeted conservation strategies to address the hazards posed by light pollution to nocturnally migrating birds.  
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  ISSN 1540-9295 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2285  
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Author Lu, Y.; Coops, N.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Bright lights, big city: Causal effects of population and GDP on urban brightness Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 13 Issue 7 Pages e0199545  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Cities are arguably both the cause, and answer, to societies' current sustainability issues. Urbanization is the interplay between a city's physical growth and its socio-economic development, both of which consume a substantial amount of energy and resources. Knowledge of the underlying driver(s) of urban expansion facilitates not only academic research but, more importantly, bridges the gap between science, policy drafting, and practical urban management. An increasing number of researchers are recognizing the benefits of innovative remotely sensed datasets, such as nighttime lights data (NTL), as a proxy to map urbanization and subsequently examine the driving socio-economic variables in cities. We further these approaches, by taking a trans-pacific view, and examine how an array of socio-economic ind0icators of 25 culturally and economically important urban hubs relate to long term patterns in NTL for the past 21 years. We undertake a classic econometric approach-panel causality tests which allow analysis of the causal relationships between NTL and socio-economic development across the region. The panel causality test results show a contrasting effect of population and gross domestic product (GDP) on NTL in fast, and slowly, changing cities. Information derived from this study quantitatively chronicles urban activities in the pan-Pacific region and potentially offers data for studies that spatially track local progress of sustainable urban development goals.  
  Address Integrated Remote Sensing Studio, Forest Recourses Management, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29995923 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1963  
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Author Kernbach, M. E., Cassone, V. M., Unnasch, T. R., & Martin, L. B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Broad-spectrum light pollution suppresses melatonin and increases West Nile virus–induced mortality in House Sparrows (Passer domesticus) Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication The Condor Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) has become a pervasive anthropogenic stressor for both humans and wildlife. Although many negative impacts of ALAN on human health have been identified, the consequences for infectious disease dynamics are largely unexplored. With the increase in popularity of energy efficient light-emitting diodes (LEDs), the effects of spectral composition of ALAN have also come into question. Previous studies showed that exposure to low levels of incandescent ALAN extended the infectious period of House Sparrows (Passer domesticus) infected with West Nile virus (WNV) without affecting mortality rates, thus increasing the pathogen initial reproductive rate (R0) by ~41%. Here, we asked whether exposure to broad-spectrum (3000 K [Kelvin; unit of color temperature]) ALAN suppressed melatonin, a hormone implicated in ALAN-induced physiological consequences, in House Sparrows. We then asked whether amber-hue bulbs (1800 K) could ameliorate the effects of WNV on individual sparrows, and whether broad-spectrum or blue-rich bulbs (3000 K and 5000 K, respectively) could exacerbate them. We found that exposure to low intensity (~5 lux) broad-spectrum (3000 K) ALAN significantly suppressed melatonin levels throughout the night. Second, we found that exposure to broad-spectrum and blue-rich (3000 + 5000 K) lights did not affect WNV viremia but did increase WNV-induced mortality. Conversely, birds exposed to amber-hue (1800 K) ALAN had lower viremia and mortality rates similar to controls (i.e. natural light conditions). This study demonstrates that ALAN affects melatonin regulation in birds, but this effect, as well as ALAN influences on infectious disease responses, can be ameliorated by particular lighting technologies.  
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  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2967  
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Author Zhao, M., Zhou, Y., Li, X., Zhou, C., Cheng, W., Li, M., & Huang, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Building a Series of Consistent Night-Time Light Data (1992–2018) in Southeast Asia by Integrating DMSP-OLS and NPP-VIIRS Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 58 Issue 3 Pages 1843-1856  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Satellite-derived nighttime light (NTL) data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's Operational Linescan System (DMSP-OLS) and the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (NPP-VIIRS) have been extensively used for monitoring human activities and urbanization processes. Differences of these two datasets in their spatial and radiometric properties make it difficult for a temporally consistent analysis using these two datasets together. In this article, we developed a new approach to integrate these two datasets and generated a temporally consistent NTL dataset from 1992 to 2018. First, we performed the pixel-level spatial resampling of VIIRS data using a kernel density method after preprocessing the raw VIIRS data. Second, we conducted a logarithmic transformation of the aggregated VIIRS data. Third, we proposed a sigmoid function between DMSP and processed VIIRS data to characterize their relationship. Using the proposed method, we generated a series of consistent DMSP NTL data in Southeast Asia from 1992 to 2018 and analyzed the dynamic of resulted NTL at different scales. The evaluations based on profile curves, spatial patterns, scatter correlations, and histograms, of NTLs, indicate that our approach can achieve a good agreement between DMSP and simulated DMSP data in the same year. Our approach offers the potential for generating a time series of global DMSP NTL data from 1992 to present, which can contribute a more continuous and consistent monitoring of human activities and a better understanding of the urbanization process.  
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  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2962  
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Author Thancharoen, A.; Branham, M.A.; Lloyd, J.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Building Twilight “Light Sensors”: To Study the Effects of Light Pollution on Fireflies Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication The American Biology Teacher Abbreviated Journal The American Biology Teacher  
  Volume 70 Issue 2 Pages e6-e12  
  Keywords Animals; Education  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0002-7685 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2182  
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