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Author Guillemin, A.
Title The Heavens: An Illustrated Handbook of Popular Astronomy Type (up) Book Whole
Year 1867 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract Relevant excerpt: In large towns, the thousands of gas-lamps or other lights render the observation of the Zodiacal Light very difficult, not to say impossible, at all times. On the other hand, in stations conveniently situated, it can be seen at the various epochs of the year, even in the temperate zones.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Richard Bently Place of Publication London Editor J. Norman Lockyer
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2537
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Author Roach, F.E.; Gordon, J.L.
Title The Light of the Night Sky Type (up) Book Whole
Year 1973 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Natural Sky Brightness; Airglow
Abstract Astronomy appears to us as a combination of art, science, and philosophy. Its study puts the universe into perspective, giving a sense of pleasure in its beauty, awe at its immensity, and humility at our trivial place in it. From earliest human history, man has scrutinized the night sky – and wondered and marveled. With unaided eye but perceptive mind, he recognized order in the regular appearance and movements of individual objects, such as the planets and star groups (constellations), in their rhythmic and majestic progressions across the bowl of night. Even in the present era of scientific exactitude, there remains a profound awareness of mysteries beyond our present interpretations. It is only in comparatively recent years, however, that man has recognized that it takes more than conventional astronomy to account for the beauties ofthe night sky. Radiations in the Earth's upper atmosphere provide a foreground light, the study of which has come under a new name, aeronomy. The science of aeronomy has rapidly burgeoned, and the student of the light of the night sky finds that he is involved in an interdisciplinary domain. The 'meat' of one discipline, however, may be the 'poison' of the other. To the astronomer, the Earth's atmosphere, inhibiting his extra-terrestrial viewing, is a serious nuisance. To the aeronomer, the Moon, planets, stars, and Galaxies hamper his measurements and interfere with his studies of the Earth's upper atmosphere. Yet both sets of elements are basic to the beauties as well as to the understanding of the light of the night sky. It is essentially the students of astronomy and aeronomy for whom we have written this book. We also hope, however, that it will present much of interest and value to the bemused sky watcher, for whom some detailed knowledge of the several con-tried to meld these dual objectives to create a broadly based, professionally valid tributors to the nighttinie sky may increase his pleasure in contemplating it. We have treatise that will lead the serious student to deeper probing into the phenomena and will inspire both him and the enthusiastic amateur to an appreciation of that half of their experience which we may refer to as their 'night life'.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Reidel Publishing Company Place of Publication Dordrecht, Holland Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3125
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Author Wren, W.; Locke, S.
Title Upgraded Rig Lighting Improves Night Time Visibility While Reducing Stray Light and the Threat to Dark Skies in West Texas Type (up) Conference Article
Year 2015 Publication Society of Petroleum Engineers Abbreviated Journal Soc. Petrol. Engr.
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Lighting; outdoor lighting; petroleum; oil and gas; lighting engineering
Abstract McDonald Observatory, part of the University of Texas at Austin, is a world-class astronomical-research facility representing hundreds of millions of dollars of public and private investment that is increasingly threatened by nighttime lighting from oil-and-gas-related activities in and around the Permian Basin. Established in the remote Davis Mountains of West Texas in 1932, the observatory is home to some of the world's largest telescopes and it has continued as a world-renowned research center. Dark night skies are crucial to its mission. Since 2010, however, the sky along the observatory's northern horizon, in the direction of the Permian Basin, has been steadily and rapidly brightening, due to new exploration for oil and gas. The pace has been accelerating: More than 2,000 applications were filed over the past year to drill in the region. In 2011, the State of Texas enacted a law that instructs the seven counties surrounding McDonald Observatory, an area covering some 28,000 square miles, to adopt outdoor lighting ordinances designed to preserve the dark night skies for ongoing astronomical research at the observatory. Most had already done so voluntarily, but additional effort is needed throughout the area to address fast-moving energy-exploration activities.

A joint project between McDonald Observatory and Pioneer Energy Services (PES) has demonstrated that many of the adverse effects of oilfield lighting can be mitigated, without jeopardizing safety, through proper shielding and aiming of light fixtures. Beginning July, 2013, PES granted the observatory access to a working rig, Pioneer Rig #29. Every time the rig moved to a new location, there was an opportunity to install shields, re-aim floodlights, and evaluate effectiveness.

This joint project demonstrated that, in many cases, nighttime visibility on the rig can be significantly improved. Many light fixtures, which had been sources of blinding glare due to of lack of shielding, poor placement, or poor aiming, were made better and safer, using optional glare shields that are offered by manufacturers for a variety of fixture models. Proper shielding and aiming of existing fixtures improves visibility and reduces wasted uplight. New lighting systems that take advantage of light-emitting-diode technology also promise better directionality, reduced fuel consumption, and darker skies overhead.

The oil-and-gas industry has been lighting its exploration and production activities in much same way for more than 100 years, with little to no consideration of environmental impacts. The opportunity exists to adopt new lighting practices and technologies that improve safety, reduce costs, and help preserve our vanishing night skies so that important ongoing scientific exploration can continue.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Society of Petroleum Engineers Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes SPE E&P Health, Safety, Security and Environmental Conference-Americas held in Denver, Colorado, USA, 16–18 March 2015 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1993
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Author Elvidge, C. D.; Erwin, E.H.; Baugh, K.E.; Ziskin, D.; Tuttle, B.T.; Ghosh, T.; Sutton, P.C.
Title Overview of DMSP nightime lights and future possibilities Type (up) Conference Article
Year 2009 Publication Joint Urban Remote Sensing Event Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Remote Sensing; DMSP; DMSP-OLS; Night lights
Abstract The Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS) has a unique capability to collect low-light imaging data of the earth at night. The OLS and its predecessors have collected this style of data on a nightly global basis since 1972. The digital archive of OLS data extends back to 1992. Over the years several global nighttime lights products have been generated. NGDC has now produced a set of global cloud-free nighttime lights products, specifically processed for the detection of changes in lighting emitted by human settlements, spanning 1992-93 to 2008. While the OLS is far from ideal for observing nighttime lights, the DMSP nighttime lights products have been successfully used in modeling the spatial distribution of population density, carbon emissions, and economic activity.
Address Earth Observation Group NOAA National Geophysical Data Center Boulder, Colorado 80305 USA; chris.elvidge(at)noaa.gov
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher IEEE Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2334-0932 ISBN 978-1-4244-3461-9 Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2668
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Author Pack, D. W., Coffman, C. M., & Santiago, J. R.
Title A Year in Space for the CUbesat MULtispectral Observing System: CUMULOS Type (up) Conference Article
Year 2019 Publication 33rd Annual AIAA/USU Conference on Small Satellites Abbreviated Journal
Volume SSC19-XI-01 Issue Pages
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract CUMULOS is a three-camera system flying as a secondary payload on the Integrated Solar Array and Reflectarray Antenna (ISARA) mission with the goals of researching the use of uncooled commercial infrared cameras for Earth

remote sensing and demonstrating unique nighttime remote sensing capabilities. Three separate cameras comprise the CUMULOS payload: 1) a visible (VIS) Si CMOS camera, 2) a shortwave infrared (SWIR) InGaAs camera, and 3) a longwave infrared (LWIR) vanadium oxide microbolometer. This paper reviews on-orbit operations during the past year, in-space calibration observations and techniques, and Earth remote sensing highlights from the first year of space

operations. CUMULOS operations commenced on 8 June 2018 following the successful completion of the primary ISARA mission. Some of the unique contributions from the CUMULOS payloads include: 1) demonstrating the use of bright stars for on-orbit radiometric calibration of CubeSat payloads, 2) acquisition of science-quality nighttime lights data at 130-m resolution, and 3) operating the first simple Earth observing infrared payloads successfully flown on a CubeSat. Sample remote sensing results include images of: cities at night, ship lights (including fishing vessels), oil industry gas flares, serious wildfires, volcanic activity, and daytime and nighttime clouds. The CUMULOS VIS camera has measured calibrated nightlights imagery of major cities such as Los Angeles, Singapore, Shanghai, Tokyo, Kuwait City, Abu Dhabi, Jeddah, Istanbul, and London at more than 5x the resolution of VIIRS. The utility of these data for measuring light pollution, and mapping urban growth and infrastructure development at higher resolution than

VIIRS is being studied, with an emphasis placed on Los Angeles. The “Carr”, “Camp” and “Woolsey” fires from the 2018 California fire season were imaged with all three cameras and results highlight the excellent wildfire imaging

performance that can be achieved by small sensors. The SWIR camera has exhibited extreme sensitivity to flare and fire hotspots, and was even capable of detecting airglow-illuminated nighttime cloud structures by taking advantage of the strong OH emissions within its 0.9-1.7 micron bandpass. The LWIR microbolometer has proven successful at providing cloud context imagery for our nightlights mapping experiments, can detect very large fires and the brightest flare hotspots, and can also image terrain temperature variation and urban heat islands at 300-m resolution. CUMULOS capabilities show the potential of CubeSats and small sensors to perform several VIIRS-like nighttime mission areas in which wide area coverage can be traded for greater resolution over a smaller field of view. The sensor

has been used in collaboration with VIIRS researchers to explore these mission areas and side-by-side results will be presented illustrating the capabilities as well as the limitations of small aperture LEO CubeSat systems.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2736
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