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Author Zhao, Z., Zhou, Y., Tan, G., & Li, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Research progress about the effect and prevention of blue light on eyes Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication International Journal of Ophthalmology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 11 Issue 12 Pages 1999-2003  
  Keywords Vision; Human Health; Review  
  Abstract In recent years, people have become increasingly attentive to light pollution influences on their eyes. In the visible spectrum, short-wave blue light with wavelength between 415 nm and 455 nm is closely related to eye light damage. This high energy blue light passes through the cornea and lens to the retina causing diseases such as dry eye, cataract, age-related macular degeneration, even stimulating the brain, inhibiting melatonin secretion, and enhancing adrenocortical hormone production, which will destroy the hormonal balance and directly affect sleep quality. Therefore, the effect of Blu-rays on ocular is becoming an important concern for the future. We describe blue light's effects on eye tissues, summarize the research on eye injury and its physical prevention and medical treatment.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2313  
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Author Huang, X., Wang, C., & Lu, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Understanding Spatiotemporal Development of Human Settlement in Hurricane-prone Areas on U.S. Atlantic and Gulf Coasts using Nighttime Remote Sensing Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Hurricanes, as one of the most devastating natural disasters, have posed great threats to people in coastal areas. A better understanding of spatiotemporal dynamics of human settlement in hurricane-prone areas is demanded for sustainable development. This study uses the DMSP/OLS nighttime light (NTL) data sets from 1992 to 2013 to examine human settlement development in areas with different levels of hurricane proneness. The DMSP/OLS NTL data from six satellites were intercalibrated and desaturated with AVHRR and MODIS optical imagery to derive the vegetation-adjusted NTL urban index (VANUI), a popular index that quantifies human settlement intensity. The derived VANUI time series was examined with the Mann-Kendall test and Theil-Sen test to identify significant spatiotemporal trends. To link the VANUI product to hurricane impacts, four hurricane-prone zones were extracted to represent different levels of hurricane proneness. Aside from geographic division, a wind-speed weighted track density function was developed and applied to historical North Atlantic Basin (NAB)-origin storm tracks to better categorize the four levels of hurricane proneness. Spatiotemporal patterns of human settlement in the four zones were finally analyzed. The results clearly exhibit a north-south and inland-coastal discrepancy of human settlement dynamics. This study also reveals that both the zonal extent and zonal increase rate of human settlement positively correlate with hurricane proneness levels. The intensified human settlement in high hurricane-exposure zones deserves further attention for coastal resilience.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2519  
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Author Wang, J., Zhang, J., Gong, L., Li, Q., Zhou, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Seismic Indirect Economic Loss Assessment and Recovery Evaluation Using Night-time Light Images – Application for Wenchuan Earthquake Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume In press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Economics  
  Abstract Seismic indirect economic loss not only has a major impact on regional economic recovery policies, but also related to the economic assistance at the national level. Due to the Cross-regional economic activities and the difficulty of obtaining data, it's difficult that the indirect economic loss survey covers all economic activities. However, night-time light in an area can reflect the economic activity of the region. This paper focuses on the indirect economic losses caused by the Wenchuan earthquake in 2008 and evaluated the progress of restoration and reconstruction based on night-time light Images. First, the functional relationship between GDP and night-time light parameters was established based on the pre-earthquake data. Next, the indirect loss of the earthquake was evaluated by the night-time light attenuation in the disaster area after the earthquake. Then, the capacity recovery, which is characterized by the brightness recovery process of the light area, was evaluated. Lastly, the process of light expansion in the disaster area was analyzed to evaluate the economic expansion speed and efficiency.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2064  
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Author Walbeek, T.J.; Harrison, E.M.; Soler, R.R.; Gorman, M.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Enhanced Circadian Entrainment in Mice and Its Utility under Human Shiftwork Schedules Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Clocks & Sleep Abbreviated Journal Clocks & Sleep  
  Volume 1 Issue 3 Pages 394-413  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract The circadian system is generally considered to be incapable of adjusting to rapid changes in sleep/work demands. In shiftworkers this leads to chronic circadian disruption and sleep loss, which together predict underperformance at work and negative health consequences. Two distinct experimental protocols have been proposed to increase circadian flexibility in rodents using dim light at night: rhythm bifurcation and T-cycle (i.e., day length) entrainment. Successful translation of such protocols to human shiftworkers could facilitate alignment of internal time with external demands. To assess entrainment flexibility following bifurcation and exposure to T-cycles, mice in Study 1 were repeatedly phase-shifted. Mice from experimental conditions rapidly phase-shifted their activity, while control mice showed expected transient misalignment. In Study 2 and 3, mice followed a several weeks-long intervention designed to model a modified DuPont or Continental shiftwork schedule, respectively. For both schedules, bifurcation and nocturnal dim lighting reduced circadian misalignment. Together, these studies demonstrate proof of concept that mammalian circadian systems can be rendered sufficiently flexible to adapt to multiple, rapidly changing shiftwork schedules. Flexible adaptation to exotic light-dark cycles likely relies on entrainment mechanisms that are distinct from traditional entrainment.  
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  ISSN 2624-5175 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2661  
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Author Prayag, A.; Münch, M.; Aeschbach, D.; Chellappa, S.; Gronfier, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light Modulation of Human Clocks, Wake, and Sleep Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Clocks & Sleep Abbreviated Journal Clocks & Sleep  
  Volume 1 Issue 1 Pages 193-208  
  Keywords Review; Human Health  
  Abstract Light, through its non-imaging forming effects, plays a dominant role on a myriad of physiological functions, including the human sleep–wake cycle. The non-image forming effects of light heavily rely on specific properties such as intensity, duration, timing, pattern, and wavelengths. Here, we address how specific properties of light influence sleep and wakefulness in humans through acute effects, e.g., on alertness, and/or effects on the circadian timing system. Of critical relevance, we discuss how different characteristics of light exposure across the 24-h day can lead to changes in sleep–wake timing, sleep propensity, sleep architecture, and sleep and wake electroencephalogram (EEG) power spectra. Ultimately, knowledge on how light affects sleep and wakefulness can improve light settings at home and at the workplace to improve health and well-being and optimize treatments of chronobiological disorders.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2624-5175 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2266  
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