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Author Struyf P.; Enhus E.; Bauwens T.; Melgaço L. url  openurl
  Title Literature study: The effects of reduced public lighting on crime, fear of crime, and road safety Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication west-vlaanderen Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Safety; Security; Psychology; Review  
  Abstract 1. Introduction

1.1 Stating the problem: security versus climate and economic challenges

Public street lighting as a public service is often taken for granted. However, its impact on the nocturnal perception of public space should not be underestimated. It encourages people to get out, feel safe, and be safe. Indeed, Welsh and Farrington suggest that public lighting enhances social control, cohesion, and a feeling of community pride (Welsh & Farrington, 2008b). According to (Williams, 2008), this is due to the special meaning attached to the darkness of night in society. It is associated with changes in social norms and values, transgression, the release of social control, feasting, drinking, and pleasure. Meanwhile, the darkness of night generates unpredictability, uncertainty and, therefore, fear. Illuminating the night chases away these feelings; people feel reassured and safer (Schivelbusch, 1995).
 
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  Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3206  
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Author Zielinska-Dabkowska, K.M.; Xavia, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title An overview of the cognitive and biological effects of city nighttime illumination including a London case study Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The Centre for Conscious Design Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Lighting  
  Abstract Current scientific research demonstrates how critical the effects of city nighttime illumination are upon cognitive and biological health1 – which needs to be adequately acknowledged, understood and addressed by conscious cities and the plans they develop. Until recent decades, the design of nighttime lighting was determined mostly by electrical engineers who often applied technical standards to meet the requirements of vehicle-focused cities. Unfortunately, consideration of pedestrians and their visual needs to navigate throughout urbanscapes at night were ignored, and so too, was the impact that artificial lighting might have on them, and the environment. Today, the majority of urban city lighting has been installed without full awareness of its impact, and as a result, artificial light at night (ALAN) and light pollution have become an obvious public nuisance, a health risk and an environmental burden2,3. While poor lighting has its drawbacks, a lack of lighting can have many positive aspects, and urban settings can benefit from protecting, preserving and promoting natural darkness. We present two recent planning and design initiatives of London, in the UK, where the quality of light and value of darkness were not given the degree of attention and consideration they deserve. This paper has particular relevance for urban policy makers, city planners, architects, designers, consultants and researchers as it explores the various problems caused by the obvious lack of responsible nighttime illumination.  
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  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2296  
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Author Zielinska-Dabkowska, K.M.; Schieck, A.F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Designing digital displays and interactive media in today’s cities by night. Do we know enough about attracting attention to do so? Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Conscious Cities Anthology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Commentary; Lighting  
  Abstract With the huge transformation in the development of digital screen technology and its consistently decreasing cost, digital billboards are progressively replacing traditional static, two-dimensional poster advertisements in our cities1. Previously, due to the substantial expenditure involved, they were only available to major international brands with vast promotional resources to build their brand fame. Today, however, they are being used increasingly by advertisers to deliver all kinds of messages from simple ones to more sophisticated, interactive storytelling. Soon, however, even newer ways of purchasing advertisements using computers will be introduced by the outdoor media industry to address the public, so potentially everybody will be able to rent out available advertising space and communicate the message. But are we ready for this next step? As there are no proper guidelines or regulations in place for this new medium in the urban realm, today we are facing issues such as no integration of the display’s location into the built environment, no specifications based on knowledge of human perception and the human centric design approach, no control over its content quality, and so called ‘display blindness’2 seems to be a common collective urban experience at night. Taking London as one of the most cutting-edge outdoor digital advertising environments in the world3 (with the largest number of these screens traditionally located in or in close proximity to Piccadilly Circus) this paper discusses various aspects of this new medium. Besides the layout and geometry of the space, it also focuses on navigation and attracting the visual attention of passers-by at night in a practical human oriented context. Additionally, questions regarding complex sensory, social, special and interactional issues and the necessity for interdisciplinary collaboration have been addressed.  
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  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2351  
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Author Deng, J., Che, T., Xiao, C., Wang, S., Dai, L., & Meerzhan, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Suitability Analysis of Ski Areas in China: An Integrated Study Based on Natural and Socioeconomic Conditions Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication The Cryosphere Abbreviated Journal The Cryosphere  
  Volume 13 Issue Pages 2149–2167  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; China; Skiing; winter sports; GIS; Asia  
  Abstract The successful bidding of the 2022 Winter Olympics (Beijing 2022, officially known as the XXIV Olympic Winter Games) has greatly stimulated Chinese enthusiasm to participate in winter sports. Consequently, the Chinese ski industry is rapidly booming driven by enormous market demand and government support. However, investing in ski area at an unreasonable location will cause problems both from economic perspective (in terms of operation and management) as well as geographical concerns (such as environmental degradation). To evaluate the suitability of a ski area based on scientific 20 metrics has since become a prerequisite to the sustainable development of ski industry. In this study, we evaluate the locational suitability of ski areas in China by integrating their natural and socioeconomic conditions using linear weighted method based on geographic information systems (GIS) spatial analysis combined with remote sensing, online and field survey data. Key indexes for evaluating the natural suitability include snow cover, air temperature, topographic conditions, groundwater, and vegetation, whereas socioeconomic suitability is evaluated based on economic conditions, accessibility of transportation, 25 distance to tourist attractions, and distance to cities. As such, an integrated metrics considering both natural and socioeconomic suitability is defined to be a threshold and used to identify the suitability of a candidate region for ski area development. The results show that 92% of existing ski areas are located in areas with an integrated index greater than 0.5. In contrary, a ski area is considered to be a dismal prospect when the locational integrated index is less than 0.5. Finally, corresponding development strategies for decision-makers are proposed based on the multi-criteria metrics, which will be extended to incorporate potential influences from future climate change and socioeconomic development.  
  Address Heihe Remote Sensing Experimental Research Station, Key Laboratory of Remote Sensing of Gansu Province, Northwest Institute of Eco-Environment and Resources, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, 730000, China; chetao(at)lzb.ac.cn  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Copernicus Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
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  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2522  
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Author Chu, L., Oloo, F., Sudmanns, M., Tiede, D., Hölbling, D.,Blaschke, T., & Teleoaca, I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Monitoring long-term shoreline dynamics and human activities in the Hangzhou Bay, China, combining daytime and nighttime EO data Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Big Earth Data Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Shorelines are vulnerable to anthropogenic activities including urbanization, land reclamation and sediment loading. Shoreline changes may be a reflection of the degradation of coastal ecosystems because of human activities. Understanding the shoreline dynamics is, therefore, a topic of global concern. Earth observation data, such as multi-temporal satellite images, are an important resource for assessing changes in coastal ecosystems. In this research, we used Google Earth Engine (GEE) to monitor and map historical shoreline dynamics in the Hangzhou Bay in China where the Qiantang River flows into the East China Sea. Specifically, we aimed to capture and quantify both the spatial and temporal shoreline changes and to assess the link between anthropogenic activities and shoreline changes on the integrity of this coastal area. We implemented a Tasselled Cap analysis (TCA) on Landsat imagery from 1985 to 2018 in GEE to calculate the wetness coefficient. We then applied Otsu method for automatic image thresholding on the wetness coefficient to detect waterbodies and shoreline changes. Further, we adopted the nighttime light data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program’s Operational Linescan System (DMSP-OLS) from 1992 to 2013 as a proxy of human activities. The results show that in the hotspot areas, the shoreline has moved by more than 5 km in the last decades, accounting for approximately 900 km2 of land accretion. Within this area, the human activity, indicated by the intensity of nighttime light, increased significantly. The results of this work reveal the influence of human activities on the shoreline dynamics and can support policies that promote the sustainable use and conservation of coastal environments. Our methodology can be transferred and applied to other coastal zones in various regions and scaled up to larger areas.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2952  
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