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Author Nankoo, S.; Raymond, S.; Galvez-Cloutier, R. url  doi
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  Title The impact of the Jacques Cartier bridge illumination on the food chain: from insects to predators Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Community Ecology Abbreviated Journal Community Ecology  
  Volume 20 Issue 2 Pages 172-180  
  Keywords Animals; Ecology  
  Abstract Artificial light at night can impact numerous diurnal species by influencing their distribution and habits. In this study, artificial lights placed on the Jacques Cartier bridge in Montreal, Canada were evaluated to determine their impact on insects, insectivorous birds and peregrine falcons. The impact was measured the year the illumination begun and the year following (two years in total). Insect distribution and abundance at three different sites around the bridge was measured. Insectivorous bird abundance and activity were evaluated by observing the cliff swallow as a proxy. Peregrine falcon presence and nesting behavior at the bridge was measured. Insects (aerial and aquatic) were found to be more abundant closer to the illuminated part of the bridge and particularly in the year following the illumination's beginning. Similarly, cliff swallows were more abundant at the bridge the year following the start of the illumination and their activity was more important closer to the illuminated section. Peregrine falcons were only present at the bridge in the year following the beginning of the illumination and specifically at the illuminated part of the bridge. No nesting was detected. These three groups are connected to each other through a food chain in which insect abundance impacts insectivorous bird abundance, which in turn impacts peregrine falcon presence. The illumination therefore positively impacts these three groups separately and together through their food chain. This research highlights the importance of monitoring bird and insect population close to the bridge and further continuation of these observations are necessary to determine if the observed tendency will continue to develop throughout the years.  
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  ISSN 1585-8553 ISBN Medium  
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  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2705  
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Author Downey, J.W. url  openurl
  Title Determination of minimum light sense and retinal dark adaptation with presentation of a new type of photometer Type Journal Article
  Year 1919 Publication American Journal of Ophthalmology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 2 Issue 1 Pages 13-20  
  Keywords Vision; Instrumentation  
  Abstract This paper reviews the principal hypotheses with reference to light and dark adaptation, and suggests a practical photometer, using a radioactive substance as a standard of comparison. With three illustrations, and experimental findings with this instrument.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2418  
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Author Strobl, E. url  openurl
  Title The Impact of Typhoons on Economic Activity in the Philippines: Evidence from Nightlight Intensity Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication ADB Economics Working Paper Series Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 589 Issue Pages  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract We quantify the economic impact of typhoons in the Philippines. To this end we construct a panel data set of local economic activity derived from nightlight intensity satellite images and a cell level measure of typhoon damage constructed from storm track data, a wind field model, and a stylized damage function. Our econometric results reveal that there is a statistically and potentially economically significant, albeit short- lived, impact of typhoon destruction on local economic activity. Constructing risk profiles from a 60-year historical set of storms suggests that (near) future losses in economic activity for frequent (5-year return period) and rare (50-year return period) events are likely

to range from between 1.0% and 2.5%.
 
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  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2641  
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Author Hamacher, D.W.; De Napoli, K.; Mott, B. url  openurl
  Title Whitening the Sky: light pollution as a form of cultural genocide Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of Dark Sky Studies Abbreviated Journal J of Dark Sky Studies  
  Volume 1 Issue in press Pages  
  Keywords Society; Blue-rich light sources; indigenous knowledge; aboriginal australia; torres strait islanders; decolonizing methodologies  
  Abstract Light pollution is actively destroying our ability to see the stars and disconnecting people from their deep-time connection to the sky, acting as a form of ongoing cultural and ecological genocide for Indigenous people around the world. Many traditional knowledge systems are based on the stars and peoples' ablity to observe and interpret them for a range of practical, social, and scientific purposes is critical. Efforts to reduce, minimise, or eliminate light pollution are being achieved with varying degrees of success, but the increased use of blue-light emitting LEDs as a cost-effective solution is worsening problems related to human health, wildlife, and astronomical heritage for the benefit of capitalistic economic growth. We provide a brief overview illustrating some of the important connections that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people maintain with the stars, as well as the worsening damage growing light pollution is causing to this ancient knowledge. We propose a transdisciplinary approach to solving the issues of growing light pollution, using a foundation based on Indigenous philosophies and decolonising methodologies.  
  Address ARC Centre of Excellence for All-Sky Astrophysics in Three Dimensions (ASTRO-3D), School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 30130, Australia; duane.hamacher@unimelb.edu.au  
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  Publisher University of Utah Place of Publication USA Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2780  
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Author Narboni, R. url  openurl
  Title LIGHTING PUBLIC SPACES: NEW TRENDS AND FUTURE EVOLUTIONS. Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Light & Engineering Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 28 Issue 2 Pages 4-16  
  Keywords Lighting; History  
  Abstract The article is devoted to the history and prospects of the development of outdoor lighting in public spaces with new opportunities of rapidly developing lighting technologies and trends in architecture and architectural lighting, taking into account environmental problems.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2899  
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