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Author Agnew, J.; Gillespie, T.W.; Gonzalez, J.; Min, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Baghdad Nights: Evaluating the US Military ‘Surge’ Using Nighttime Light Signatures Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Environment and Planning A Abbreviated Journal Environ Plan A  
  Volume 40 Issue 10 Pages 2285-2295  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Commentary  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0308-518X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2028  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ebbensgaard, C.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Standardised difference: Challenging uniform lighting through standards and regulation Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Urban Studies Abbreviated Journal Urban Studies  
  Volume in press Issue Pages 0042098019866568  
  Keywords Regulation; Lighting; Conservation; Darkness; Planning; Society  
  Abstract Artificial lighting has received increased attention from urban scholars and geographers in recent years. It is celebrated for its experimental aesthetics and experiential qualities and critiqued for its adverse effects on biological life and the environment. Yet scholars and practitioners unite in their disapproval of uniform and homogenous lighting that follows from standardised lighting technologies and design principles. Absent from debates in urban scholarship and geography, however, is any serious consideration of how lighting designers respond to such standardised measures and regulations. In this article, I address this lack of academic attention by exploring how designers overturn the restrictive challenges posed by the standards and regulations of the design and planning process. Drawing on interviews with designers involved in the lighting design of a mixed-use redevelopment project in Canning Town, East London, I demonstrate how the interpretation and translation of lighting standards and regulations resist the tendency to predetermine design aesthetics and functions. By drawing attention away from the technical specifications and numerical values that are prescribed in standards and regulations, and towards lighting’s experiential and performative effects, the article argues that lighting designers can play an important role in challenging how standards and regulations are measured, defined and maintained. Calling on urban scholars to play a more prominent role in foregrounding this process of translation, I suggest that standards and regulations can provide frameworks within which luminous differentiation and preservation of darkness can be achieved, playing a potentially crucial role in ensuring a socially and environmentally sustainable transition to energy efficient lighting.  
  Address  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0042-0980 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2678  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sutton, P.C.; Anderson, S.J.; Elvidge, C.D.; Tuttle, B.T.; Ghosh, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Paving the planet: impervious surface as proxy measure of the human ecological footprint Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Progress in Physical Geography: Earth and Environment Abbreviated Journal Progress in Physical Geography: Earth and Environment  
  Volume 33 Issue 4 Pages 510-527  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Fundamental questions regarding the human-environment-sustainability problematic remain contested. What are the relative roles of population, consumption, and technology with respect to sustainability? How can sustainability be measured? Numerous metrics have been developed to address these controversial questions including ideas of carrying capacity, environmental sustainability indices, and ecological footprints. This work explores the question: is pavement a proxy measure of human impact on the environment? We explore and evaluate the use of satellite derived density grids of constructed area (aka ‘pavement’ or ‘impervious surface’) in the calculation of national and subnational ‘ecological footprints’. We generated a global constructed area density grid for the 2000—2001 period using satellite observed nighttime lights and a population count grid from the US Department of Energy. Satellite data inputs to the population product include MODIS landcover, SRTM topography and high-resolution imagery. Calibration of the global constructed area density product was derived from high-resolution aerial photographs. We demonstrate that a satellite derived constructed area per person index can serve as a proxy measure of ecological footprints at both the national and subnational level. This relatively simple and globally uniform measure of human impact on the environment correlates strongly with other more difficult to obtain measures.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0309-1333 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2441  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Barrette, T.P.; Pike, A.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Closed-Course Human Factors Evaluation of Marking and Marker Visibility Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board Abbreviated Journal Transportation Research Record  
  Volume 2673 Issue 10 Pages 840-849  
  Keywords Vision; Transportation; Raised retroreflective pavement markers; retroreflectivity  
  Abstract Raised retroreflective pavement markers (RRPMs) are commonly used to provide nighttime delineation of roadways. Although RRPMs are visible during dry conditions, they provide their greatest benefit during wet-night conditions, when typical pavement markings become flooded and lose their retroreflectivite properties. Naturally, the retroreflectivity of RRPMs degrades over time as a result of traffic, ultraviolet light, precipitation, and roadway maintenance activities. Subsequently, it is necessary to examine the relationship between driver performance and the condition of the RRPMs. To assess visibility relative to RRPM condition, study participants rode in the passenger seat of a vehicle operated by a member of the research team, traveling at approximately 15 mph, for two laps around a closed course. Throughout each lap of the course, nine treatments consisting of RRPMs or preformed pavement marking tape of various retroreflectivity levels diverged from a center line to either the right or left. Participants indicated when they could tell which direction the treatment diverged, which was recorded using a GPS unit. A generalized linear model was estimated on a dataset constructed by pairing the observed distances from various treatments with demographic information about each participant. The analysis indicates the distance at which a particular treatment would be visible, which can then be converted to preview time to assess treatment adequacy for a variety of speeds. The RRPM treatments generally provided adequate preview time for older drivers based on the extant literature; however, the preformed pavement marking tape was less adequate at higher speeds and under overhead lighting.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0361-1981 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2499  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Barrette, T.P.; Pike, A.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Closed-Course Human Factors Evaluation of Marking and Marker Visibility Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board Abbreviated Journal Transportation Research Record  
  Volume 2673 Issue 10 Pages 840-849  
  Keywords Vision  
  Abstract Raised retroreflective pavement markers (RRPMs) are commonly used to provide nighttime delineation of roadways. Although RRPMs are visible during dry conditions, they provide their greatest benefit during wet-night conditions, when typical pavement markings become flooded and lose their retroreflectivite properties. Naturally, the retroreflectivity of RRPMs degrades over time as a result of traffic, ultraviolet light, precipitation, and roadway maintenance activities. Subsequently, it is necessary to examine the relationship between driver performance and the condition of the RRPMs. To assess visibility relative to RRPM condition, study participants rode in the passenger seat of a vehicle operated by a member of the research team, traveling at approximately 15 mph, for two laps around a closed course. Throughout each lap of the course, nine treatments consisting of RRPMs or preformed pavement marking tape of various retroreflectivity levels diverged from a center line to either the right or left. Participants indicated when they could tell which direction the treatment diverged, which was recorded using a GPS unit. A generalized linear model was estimated on a dataset constructed by pairing the observed distances from various treatments with demographic information about each participant. The analysis indicates the distance at which a particular treatment would be visible, which can then be converted to preview time to assess treatment adequacy for a variety of speeds. The RRPM treatments generally provided adequate preview time for older drivers based on the extant literature; however, the preformed pavement marking tape was less adequate at higher speeds and under overhead lighting.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0361-1981 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2775  
Permanent link to this record
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