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Author Elliott, J.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The daily activity patterns of mayfly nymphs (Ephemeroptera) Type Journal Article
  Year 1968 Publication Journal of Zoology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 155 Issue 2 Pages 201-221  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Nymphs of Baëtis rhodani (Pictet), Ephemerella ignita (Poda), Ecdyonurus venosus (Fabricius), Rhithrogena semicolorata (Curtis), and Heptagenia lateralis (Curtis) showed a similar endogenous rhythm of activity under conditions of natural illumination, continuous light and continuous darkness; and were most active at night when they moved from the lower to the upper surface of the stone. The nymphs were positively thigmotactic and negatively phototactic in flowing water, but these taxes and the endogenous activity rhythm of all species except Heptagenia lateralis changed markedly when the flow of water ceased.  
  Address  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0952-8369 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2467  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Taylor, G.; Davies, W.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Control Of Leaf Growth Of Betula And Acer By Photoenvironment Type Journal Article
  Year 1985 Publication New Phytologist Abbreviated Journal New Phytol  
  Volume 101 Issue 2 Pages 259-268  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract Leaf extension of one‐year‐old seedlings of silver birch (Betula pendula Roth.) and sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.), was measured using linear variable transducers (LVDTs) interfaced to a microcomputer. Birch and sycamore seedlings exhibited contrasting patterns of leaf extension during a diurnal cycle with a 16 h photoperiod. Birch leaves grew more rapidly when illuminated; growth during the photoperiod was approximately doubled when compared with growth in the dark. Mean relative growth rates ±SE at ‘lights‐on + 3 h’ and ‘lights‐off + 5 h’ were 0.0136 ± 0.0016 and 0.0066 ± 0.0005 h−1 respectively. In direct contrast, growth of sycamore leaves was increased when leaves were darkened; mean relative growth rates + SE at ‘lights‐on+3 h’ and ‘lights‐off + 5 h’ were 0.0056 ± 0.0005 and 0.0094 ± 0.0008 h‐1 respectively.

When leaves of birch and sycamore were darkened, increased leaf turgor was measured in both species, but only in sycamore was this higher night‐time turgor associated with a higher rate of leaf growth.

Cell wall extensibility (WEX), an indication of the ability of cell walls to loosen and extend irreversibly, and cell surface pH were assessed in darkened and illuminated leaves of both species. An increase in WEX was measured when birch leaves were illuminated (P≤ 0.001) and this was accompanied by a decline in cell surface pH (P≤ 0.001). However, when leaves of sycamore were illuminated, WEX declined (P≤ 005) and cell surface pH increased (P≤ 0.001).

The ability of these species to survive beneath a woodland canopy is discussed in relation to the cellular factors controlling their leaf growth.
 
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-646X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1992  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Holveck, M.-J.; Grégoire, A.; Doutrelant, C.; Lambrechts, M.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Nest height is affected by lamppost lighting proximity in addition to nestbox size in urban great tits Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Avian Biology Abbreviated Journal J Avian Biol  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Both natural and artificial light have proximate influences on many aspects of avian biology, physiology and behaviour. To date artificial light at night is mostly considered as being a nuisance disrupting for instance sleep and reproduction of diurnal species. Here, we investigate if lamppost night lighting affects cavity‐nesting bird species inside their breeding cavity. Nest height in secondary cavity‐nesting species is the result of trade‐offs between several selective forces. Predation is the prevailing force leading birds to build thin nests to increase the distance towards the entrance hole. A thin nest may also limit artificial light exposure at night. Yet, a minimum level of daylight inside nesting cavities is necessary for adequate visual communication and/or offspring development. Against this background, we hypothesised that avian nest‐building behaviour varies in response to a change in night lighting. We monitored nest height of urban great tits (Parus major) during six years and found that it varied with artificial light proximity. The birds built thinner nests inside nestboxes of various sizes in response to increasing lamppost night light availability at the nest. In large nestboxes, the nests were also thinner when a lamppost was present in the territory. Whether this relationship between artificial night lighting and nest height reflects a positive or negative effect of urbanisation is discussed in the light of recent experimental studies conducted in rural populations by other research groups.  
  Address  
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  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0908-8857 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2062  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wickham, D.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Attracting and Controlling Coastal Pelagic Fish with Nightlights Type Journal Article
  Year 1973 Publication Transactions of the American Fisheries Society Abbreviated Journal Transactions of the American Fisheries Society  
  Volume 102 Issue 4 Pages 816-825  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Field experiments were conducted in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico to evaluate techniques for using sequentially‐operated lamp strings and moving lamps to lead and concentrate light‐attracted coastal pelagic fishes. Fish were successfully led between sequentially‐operated under‐water lamps separated by distances up to 20 meters. Mobile lamps were used to lead fish distances up to approximately 1 kilometer. Fish aggregations which form daily around man‐made structures were held after dark and led clear with moving lamps for capture by purse seine. A combination of nightlighting and man‐made structure fish attraction techniques are proposed for harvesting coastal pelagic fish aggregations which occur around existing petroleton drilling platforms, well heads, and other areas presently inaccessible to conventional fishing gear.  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0002-8487 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2452  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Moore, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Relative Length of Day and Night Type Journal Article
  Year 1920 Publication Ecology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 1 Issue 3 Pages 234-237  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract  
  Address  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0012-9658 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2407  
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