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Author El-Bakry, H.A.; Ismail, I.A.; Soliman, S.S.
Title Immunosenescence-like state is accelerated by constant light exposure and counteracted by melatonin or turmeric administration through DJ-1/Nrf2 and P53/Bax pathways Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology. B, Biology Abbreviated Journal J Photochem Photobiol B
Volume (down) 186 Issue Pages 69-80
Keywords Animals
Abstract The awareness of the interrelationship between immunosenescence and constant light exposure can provide new insights into the consequences of excessive exposure to light at night due to light pollution or shift work. Here, we investigated whether constant light exposure (LL) acts as an inducer of immunosenescence. We also determined the role of melatonin or turmeric in reversing the putative effects of constant light and explored for the first time the underlying molecular mechanisms. Young (3-4-month-old) rats were exposed daily to LL alone or in combination with each of melatonin and turmeric for 12weeks. A group of aged rats (18-months old; n=6) was used as a reference for natural immunosenescence. Constant light exposure resulted in remarkable pathophysiological alterations resembling those noticed in normal aged rats, manifested as apparent decreases in antioxidant activities as well as Nrf2 and DJ-1 expressions, striking augmentation in oxidative stress, proinflammatory cytokines and expression of TNFalpha, Bax, and p53 genes, and deleterious changes of lymphoid organs, Co-administration of melatonin or turmeric was able to reverse all alterations induced by LL through upregulation of Nrf2/DJ-1 and downregulation of p53/Bax pathways. These data suggest that LL accelerates immunosenescence via oxidative stress and apoptotic pathways. They also demonstrate for the first time that turmeric is comparable to melatonin in boosting the immune function and counteracting the LL-associated immunosenescence. These effects suggest that turmeric supplementation can be used as an inexpensive intervention to prevent circadian disruption-related immunosenescence. However, to validate the effects of turmeric on humans further studies are warranted.
Address Department of Zoology & Entomology, Faculty of Science, Minia University, Egypt
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1011-1344 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30015062 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1984
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Author Shi, K.; Chen, Y.; Yu, B.; Xu, T.; Yang, C.; Li, L.; Huang, C.; Chen, Z.; Liu, R.; Wu, J.
Title Detecting spatiotemporal dynamics of global electric power consumption using DMSP-OLS nighttime stable light data Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Applied Energy Abbreviated Journal Applied Energy
Volume (down) 184 Issue Pages 450-463
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract The rapid development of global industrialization and urbanization has resulted in a great deal of electric power consumption (EPC), which is closely related to economic growth, carbon emissions, and the long-term stability of global climate. This study attempts to detect spatiotemporal dynamics of global EPC using the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program’s Operational Linescan System (DMSP-OLS) nighttime stable light (NSL) data. The global NSL data from 1992 to 2013 were intercalibrated via a modified invariant region (MIR) method. The global EPC at 1 km resolution was then modeled using the intercalibrated NSL data to assess spatiotemporal dynamics of EPC from a global scale down to continental and national scales. The results showed that the MIR method not only reduced the saturated lighted pixels, but also improved the continuity and comparability of the NSL data. An accuracy assessment was undertaken and confined that the intercalibrated NSL data were relatively suitable and accurate for estimating EPC in the world. Spatiotemporal variations of EPC were mainly identified in Europe, North America, and Asia. Special attention should be paid to China where the high grade and high-growth type of EPC covered 0.409% and 1.041% of the total country area during the study period, respectively. The results of this study greatly enhance the understanding of spatiotemporal dynamics of global EPC at the multiple scales. They will provide a scientific evidence base for tracking spatiotemporal dynamics of global EPC.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0306-2619 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2486
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Author Pauwels, J.; Le Viol, I.; Azam, C.; Valet, N.; Julien, J.-F.; Bas, Y.; Lemarchand, C.; Sanchez de Miguel, A.; Kerbiriou, C.
Title Accounting for artificial light impact on bat activity for a biodiversity-friendly urban planning Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Landscape and Urban Planning Abbreviated Journal Landscape and Urban Planning
Volume (down) 183 Issue Pages 12-25
Keywords Animals; Remote Sensing
Abstract Light pollution constitutes a major threat to biodiversity by decreasing habitat quality and landscape connectivity for nocturnal species. While there is an increasing consideration of biodiversity in urban management policies, the impact of artificial light is poorly accounted for. This is in a large part due to the lack of quantitative information and relevant guidelines to limit its negative effects. Here we compared the potential of two sources of information on light pollution, remote sensing (nocturnal picture taken from the International Space Station ISS) and ground-based (location of streetlights) data, to measure its impact on bats. Our aims were to (i) evaluate how light pollution affected Pipistrellus pipistrellus activity at the city scale, (ii) determine which source of information was the most relevant to measure light pollution’s effect and (iii) define a reproducible methodology applicable in land management to account for biodiversity in lighting planning. We used citizen science data to model the activity of P. pipistrellus, a species considered light tolerant, within three cities of France while accounting for artificial light through a variable based on either source of information. We showed that at the city scale, P. pipistrellus activity is negatively impacted by light pollution irrespective of the light variable used. This detrimental effect was better described by variables based on ISS pictures than on streetlights location. Our methodology can be easily reproduced and used in urban planning to help take the impact of light pollution into consideration and promote a biodiversity-friendly management of artificial light.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0169-2046 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2118
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Author Mammola, S.; Isaia, M.; Demonte, D.; Triolo, P.; Nervo, M.
Title Artificial lighting triggers the presence of urban spiders and their webs on historical buildings Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Landscape and Urban Planning Abbreviated Journal Landscape and Urban Planning
Volume (down) 180 Issue Pages 187-194
Keywords Animals; Lighting
Abstract Different spider species living in the urban environment spin their webs on building facades. Due to air pollution, web aggregations entrap dirt particles over time, assuming a brownish-greyish colouration and thus determining an aesthetic impact on buildings and street furniture. In Europe, the most common species causing such an aesthetic nuisance is Brigittea civica (Lucas) (Dictynidae). In spite of the socio-economical relevance of the problem, the ecological factors driving the proliferation of this species in the urban environment are poorly described and the effectiveness of potential cleaning activities has never been discussed in scientific literature. Over one year, we studied the environmental drivers of B. civica webs in the arcades of the historical down-town district of Turin (NW-Italy). We selected a number of sampling plots on arcade ceilings and we estimated the density of B. civica webs by means of digital image analysis. In parallel, we collected information on a number of potential explanatory variables driving the arcade colonization, namely artificial lighting at night, substrate temperature, distance from the main artificial light sources and distance from the river. Regression analysis showed that the coverage of spider webs increased significantly at plots with higher light intensity, with a major effect related to the presence of historical lampposts with incandescent lamps rather than halogen lamps. We also detected a seasonal variation in the web coverage, with significant higher values in summer. Stemming from our results, we are able to suggest good practices for the containment of this phenomenon.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0169-2046 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2002
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Author Xiao, Q.; Gee, G.; Jones, R.R.; Jia, P.; James, P.; Hale, L.
Title Cross-sectional association between outdoor artificial light at night and sleep duration in middle-to-older aged adults: The NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environmental Research Abbreviated Journal Environ Res
Volume (down) 180 Issue Pages 108823
Keywords Remote Sensing; Human Health; Artificial light at night; Circadian disruption; Neighborhood; Sleep; Socioeconomic disadvantage
Abstract INTRODUCTION: Artificial light at night (ALAN) can disrupt circadian rhythms and cause sleep disturbances. Several previous epidemiological studies have reported an association between higher levels of outdoor ALAN and shorter sleep duration. However, it remains unclear how this association may differ by individual- and neighborhood-level socioeconomic status, and whether ALAN may also be associated with longer sleep duration. METHODS: We assessed the cross-sectional relationship between outdoor ALAN and self-reported sleep duration in 333,365 middle- to older-aged men and women in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. Study participants reported baseline addresses, which were geocoded and linked with outdoor ALAN exposure measured by satellite imagery data obtained from the U.S. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's Operational Linescan System. We used multinomial logistic regression to estimate the multinomial odds ratio (MOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the likelihood of reporting very short (<5h), short (<7h) and long (>/=9h) sleep relative to reporting 7-8h of sleep across quintiles of LAN. We also conducted subgroup analyses by individual-level education and census tract-level poverty levels. RESULTS: We found that higher levels of ALAN were associated with both very short and short sleep. When compared to the lowest quintile, the highest quintile of ALAN was associated with 16% and 25% increases in the likelihood of reporting short sleep in women (MORQ1 vs Q5, (95% CI), 1.16 (1.10, 1.22)) and men (1.25 (1.19, 1.31)), respectively. Moreover, we found that higher ALAN was associated with a decrease in the likelihood of reporting long sleep in men (0.79 (0.71, 0.89)). We also found that the associations between ALAN and short sleep were larger in neighborhoods with higher levels of poverty. CONCLUSIONS: The burden of short sleep may be higher among residents in areas with higher levels of outdoor LAN, and this association is likely stronger in poorer neighborhoods. Future studies should investigate the potential benefits of reducing light intensity in high ALAN areas in improve sleep health.
Address Program in Public Health, Department of Family, Population, and Preventive Medicine, Stony Brook Medicine, Stony Brook, NY, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0013-9351 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31627155 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2702
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