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Author de Jong, M.; Lamers, K.P.; Eugster, M.; Ouyang, J.Q.; Da Silva, A.; Mateman, A.C.; van Grunsven, R.H.A.; Visser, M.E.; Spoelstra, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of experimental light at night on extra-pair paternity in a songbird Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological and Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol  
  Volume (down) 329 Issue 8-9 Pages 441-448  
  Keywords animals  
  Abstract Light pollution is increasing worldwide and significantly affects animal behavior. In birds, these effects include advancement of morning activity and onset of dawn song, which may affect extra-pair paternity. Advanced dawn song of males may stimulate females to engage in extra-pair copulations, and the earlier activity onset may affect the males' mate guarding behavior. Earlier work showed an effect of light at night on extra-pair behavior, but this was in an area with other anthropogenic disturbances. Here, we present a two-year experimental study on effects of light at night on extra-pair paternity of great tits (Parus major). Previously dark natural areas were illuminated with white, red, and green LED lamps and compared to a dark control. In 2014, the proportion of extra-pair young in broods increased with distance to the red and white lamps (i.e., at lower light intensities), but decreased with distance to the poles in the dark control. In 2013, we found no effects on the proportion of extra-pair young. The total number of offspring sired by a male was unaffected by artificial light at night in both years, suggesting that potential changes in female fidelity in pairs breeding close to white and red light did not translate into fitness benefits for the males of these pairs. Artificial light at night might disrupt the natural patterns of extra-pair paternity, possibly negates potential benefits of extra-pair copulations and thus could alter sexual selection processes in wild birds.  
  Address Department of Animal Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Wageningen, The Netherlands  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2471-5638 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29952126 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1953  
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Author Kumar, J.; Malik, S.; Bhardwaj, S.K.; Rani, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Bright light at night alters the perception of daylength in Indian weaver bird (Ploceus philippinus) Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological and Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol  
  Volume (down) 329 Issue 8-9 Pages 488-496  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract The brighter nights have posed new challenges to the wild species by affecting their temporal physiology. The present study on Indian weaver bird (Ploceus philippinus) investigated if exposure to bright light at different phases of night affects their clock-mediated daily functions. Birds were placed individually in specially designed activity cages under short days and long nights (8L:16D; L = 100 lux, D < 0.1 lux) for approximately 3 weeks (19 days). Thereafter, they were divided into four groups (n = 6-9), and given approximately 2 lux light either for the entire night (ZT 08-24; zeitgeber time 0 = time of light on; pattern A) or for 4 hr (pattern B), placed in 16 hr night such that its onset coincides with the onset of night (early night group, ZT 08-12), its end with the end of night (late night group, ZT 20-24), or the night was interrupted in the middle (midnight group, ZT 14-18). The results showed that bright light in entire night induced early onset of day activity and fragmented rest at night, however, if given at different phases of night, it made the days longer by delaying end (early night group) or advancing onset of daily activity (late night group). It also suppressed the melatonin levels and increased body temperature. These results suggest that bright light at night alters the perception of daylength and affects the underlying physiology. The findings may be useful in adopting a strategy for use of night light without disturbing species fitness in their environment.  
  Address Department of Zoology, University of Lucknow, Lucknow, India  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2471-5638 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30043408 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1971  
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Author Middleton, B.; Stone, B.M.; Arendt, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Human circadian phase in 12:12 h, 200:<8 lux and 1000:<8 lux light-dark cycles, without scheduled sleep or activity Type Journal Article
  Year 2002 Publication Neuroscience Letters Abbreviated Journal Neuroscience Letters  
  Volume (down) 329 Issue 1 Pages 41-44  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract The light levels required to maintain human circadian phase in the absence of other strong time cues are not defined. We investigated circadian phase in two groups of men, living in partial temporal isolation, exposed to 12 h:12 h light:dark cycles of: (A) 200:<8 lux, broad spectrum white light for 14 days; and (B) 1000:<8lux for 14 days. The rhythm variables measured were urinary 6-sulphatoxymelatonin, rectal temperature, activity and rest (actigraphy and sleep logs). In 200:<8 lux four/six individuals showed phase delays. Exposure to 1000:<8 lux appeared to maintain synchronisation of rest-activity to 24 h, but with a significant overall phase advance of 0.81 h in temperature. These observations suggest that domestic intensity light does not maintain phase without scheduled sleep/activity, possibly due to indirect effects on behaviour influencing light exposure.  
  Address  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0304-3940 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2247  
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Author Wang, X.; Cheng, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Study on the Temporal and Spatial Pattern Differences of Chinese Light Curl Based on DMSP/OLS Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science Abbreviated Journal IOP Conf. Ser.: Earth Environ. Sci.  
  Volume (down) 310 Issue Pages 032072  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Nighttime light data can detect surface gleams that can intuitively reflect human socioeconomic activity.This paper uses the DMSP/OLS nighttime lighting data from 2001 to 2007 to analyze the coupling relationship between regional economic development and nighttime light intensity in China using regression model.The results show that the brightest areas of nighttime light are mainly concentrated in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region, the Yangtze River Delta region, and the Pearl River Delta region. With the change of theyear, the brightness of the three regions is brighter year by year, indicating that the economy is more and more developed.The linear regression model of total brightness and GDP of regional light: Y=792.218+0.024X, linear slope is 0.024, indicating a positive correlation trend.The provinces and cities with the highest total brightness of the provinces and cities are Guangdong Province, Shandong Province, and Jiangsu Province, and the lowest provinces and cities are Qinghai Province and Tibet Autonomous Region.The total brightness of regional lights in China's provinces and cities is well coupled with GDP. The total brightness of regional lights in all provinces and cities is weakened from east to west. The brightness of the 11 provinces in the eastern region is the strongest, including Beijing, Tianjin, Hebei, Liaoning, Shanghai, and Jiangsu, Zhejiang, Fujian, Shandong, Guangdong, Hainan Province.The second most powerful lighting is the eight provinces in the central region including Shanxi, Jilin, Heilongjiang, Anhui, Jiangxi, Henan, Hubei, and Hunan.The weakest lighting is in the western regions of Sichuan, Chongqing, Guizhou, Yunnan, Tibet, Shaanxi, Gansu, Qinghai, Ningxia, Xinjiang, Guangxi, Inner Mongolia and other provinces (cities).In the east of the Hu Huanyong line, the nighttime lighting is higher than the west of the Hu Huanyong line.The eastern part of China's seven geographical divisions (Shanghai, Jiangsu, Zhejiang, Anhui, Jiangxi, Shandong, Fujian, and Taiwan) has the brightest night lights.The northwestern region (Shaanxi, Gansu, Qinghai, Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, and Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region) has a weak night light.The brightness information of nighttime remote sensing data selected in this study can reflect the level of regional economic development.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1755-1315 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2670  
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Author Winger, B.M.; Weeks, B.C.; Farnsworth, A.; Jones, A.W.; Hennen, M.; Willard, D.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Nocturnal flight-calling behaviour predicts vulnerability to artificial light in migratory birds Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Proceedings. Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proc Biol Sci  
  Volume (down) 286 Issue 1900 Pages 20190364  
  Keywords animals  
  Abstract Understanding interactions between biota and the built environment is increasingly important as human modification of the landscape expands in extent and intensity. For migratory birds, collisions with lighted structures are a major cause of mortality, but the mechanisms behind these collisions are poorly understood. Using 40 years of collision records of passerine birds, we investigated the importance of species' behavioural ecologies in predicting rates of building collisions during nocturnal migration through Chicago, IL and Cleveland, OH, USA. We found that the use of nocturnal flight calls is an important predictor of collision risk in nocturnally migrating passerine birds. Species that produce flight calls during nocturnal migration tended to collide with buildings more than expected given their local abundance, whereas those that do not use such communication collided much less frequently. Our results suggest that a stronger attraction response to artificial light at night in species that produce flight calls may mediate these differences in collision rates. Nocturnal flight calls probably evolved to facilitate collective decision-making during navigation, but this same social behaviour may now exacerbate vulnerability to a widespread anthropogenic disturbance. Our results also suggest that social behaviour during migration may reflect poorly understood differences in navigational mechanisms across lineages of birds.  
  Address 4 Gantz Family Collections Center, The Field Museum , 1400 South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605 , USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30940055 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2287  
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