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Author Acuto, M.
Title We need a science of the night Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature
Volume (down) 576 Issue 7787 Pages 339
Keywords *Policy; *Society; *Commentary
Abstract (none)
Address Connected Cities Lab, University of Melbourne; michele.acuto(at)unimelb.edu.au
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Springer Nature Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31853076 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2792
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Author Manoli, G.; Fatichi, S.; Schlapfer, M.; Yu, K.; Crowther, T.W.; Meili, N.; Burlando, P.; Katul, G.G.; Bou-Zeid, E.
Title Magnitude of urban heat islands largely explained by climate and population Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature
Volume (down) 573 Issue 7772 Pages 55-60
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Urban heat islands (UHIs) exacerbate the risk of heat-related mortality associated with global climate change. The intensity of UHIs varies with population size and mean annual precipitation, but a unifying explanation for this variation is lacking, and there are no geographically targeted guidelines for heat mitigation. Here we analyse summertime differences between urban and rural surface temperatures (DeltaTs) worldwide and find a nonlinear increase in DeltaTs with precipitation that is controlled by water or energy limitations on evapotranspiration and that modulates the scaling of DeltaTs with city size. We introduce a coarse-grained model that links population, background climate, and UHI intensity, and show that urban-rural differences in evapotranspiration and convection efficiency are the main determinants of warming. The direct implication of these nonlinearities is that mitigation strategies aimed at increasing green cover and albedo are more efficient in dry regions, whereas the challenge of cooling tropical cities will require innovative solutions.
Address Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31485056 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2669
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Author Pattison, P.M.; Tsao, J.Y.; Brainard, G.C.; Bugbee, B.
Title LEDs for photons, physiology and food Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature
Volume (down) 563 Issue 7732 Pages 493-500
Keywords Lighting; Human Health; Plants; Review
Abstract Lighting based on light-emitting diodes (LEDs) not only is more energy efficient than traditional lighting, but also enables improved performance and control. The colour, intensity and distribution of light can now be controlled with unprecedented precision, enabling light to be used both as a signal for specific physiological responses in humans and plants, and as an efficient fuel for fresh food production. Here we show how a broad and improved understanding of the physiological responses to light will facilitate greater energy savings and provide health and productivity benefits that have not previously been associated with lighting.
Address Utah State University, Logan, UT, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30464269 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2110
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Author Zielinska-Dabkowska, K.M.
Title Make lighting healthier Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature
Volume (down) 553 Issue 7688 Pages 274-276
Keywords Commentary; Lighting; Human Health
Abstract Artificial illumination can stop us sleeping and make us ill. We need fresh strategies and technologies, argues Karolina M. Zielinska-Dabkowska.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2932
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Author Hou, Z.-S.; Wen, H.-S.; Li, J.-F.; He, F.; Li, Y.; Qi, X.; Zhao, J.; Zhang, K.-Q.; Tao, Y.-X.
Title Effects of photoperiod and light Spectrum on growth performance, digestive enzymes, hepatic biochemistry and peripheral hormones in spotted sea bass (Lateolabrax maculatus) Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Aquaculture Abbreviated Journal Aquaculture
Volume (down) 507 Issue Pages 419-427
Keywords Animals; fishes; spotted sea bass; Lateolabrax maculatus; Photoperiod
Abstract Growth performance, digestive and metabolic activities, and contents of peripheral hormones of spotted sea bass (Lateolabrax maculatus) juveniles were evaluated under natural light and three different light spectrums (white, blue and red) in combination with three photoperiods (light: dark cycle, 12: 12-h, 18: 6-h and 24: 0-h). Bass in 18-h blue light environment displayed the best growth performance and digestive enzyme activities, while red light environment significantly impeded growth and digestive enzyme activities. Altered contents of melatonin, cortisol, thyroid hormones (T3 and T4), and testosterone (T) were observed in bass reared in red light, suggesting that red light could disturb endocrine homeostasis associated with biological rhythm (melatonin), stress coping (melatonin and cortisol), growth and development (T3 and T4), and aggressive behavior or hyperactivity (T3, T4 and T). Impaired growth performance might be due to energy used to cope with stress. We concluded that the red spectrum environment was stressful to spotted bass and the selection of appropriate light conditions (such as 18-h blue light) might lead to a beneficial outcome for spotted sea bass culture.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0044-8486 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2329
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