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Author Xiao, Q.; Gee, G.; Jones, R.R.; Jia, P.; James, P.; Hale, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Cross-sectional association between outdoor artificial light at night and sleep duration in middle-to-older aged adults: The NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Environmental Research Abbreviated Journal Environ Res  
  Volume (down) 180 Issue Pages 108823  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Human Health; Artificial light at night; Circadian disruption; Neighborhood; Sleep; Socioeconomic disadvantage  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: Artificial light at night (ALAN) can disrupt circadian rhythms and cause sleep disturbances. Several previous epidemiological studies have reported an association between higher levels of outdoor ALAN and shorter sleep duration. However, it remains unclear how this association may differ by individual- and neighborhood-level socioeconomic status, and whether ALAN may also be associated with longer sleep duration. METHODS: We assessed the cross-sectional relationship between outdoor ALAN and self-reported sleep duration in 333,365 middle- to older-aged men and women in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. Study participants reported baseline addresses, which were geocoded and linked with outdoor ALAN exposure measured by satellite imagery data obtained from the U.S. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's Operational Linescan System. We used multinomial logistic regression to estimate the multinomial odds ratio (MOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the likelihood of reporting very short (<5h), short (<7h) and long (>/=9h) sleep relative to reporting 7-8h of sleep across quintiles of LAN. We also conducted subgroup analyses by individual-level education and census tract-level poverty levels. RESULTS: We found that higher levels of ALAN were associated with both very short and short sleep. When compared to the lowest quintile, the highest quintile of ALAN was associated with 16% and 25% increases in the likelihood of reporting short sleep in women (MORQ1 vs Q5, (95% CI), 1.16 (1.10, 1.22)) and men (1.25 (1.19, 1.31)), respectively. Moreover, we found that higher ALAN was associated with a decrease in the likelihood of reporting long sleep in men (0.79 (0.71, 0.89)). We also found that the associations between ALAN and short sleep were larger in neighborhoods with higher levels of poverty. CONCLUSIONS: The burden of short sleep may be higher among residents in areas with higher levels of outdoor LAN, and this association is likely stronger in poorer neighborhoods. Future studies should investigate the potential benefits of reducing light intensity in high ALAN areas in improve sleep health.  
  Address Program in Public Health, Department of Family, Population, and Preventive Medicine, Stony Brook Medicine, Stony Brook, NY, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0013-9351 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31627155 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2702  
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Author Jasiński, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Modeling electricity consumption using nighttime light images and artificial neural networks Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Energy Abbreviated Journal Energy  
  Volume (down) 179 Issue Pages 831-842  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract The purpose of this paper is to model electricity consumption using Artificial Neural Networks (ANN). Total electricity consumption and consumption generated by households (HH) were modeled. The input variables of the ANN were based on nighttime light images from VIIRS DNB. Studies conducted thus far have covered mainly linear models. Most of case studies focused on single countries or groups of countries with only few focusing on the sub-national scale. This paper is pioneering in covering an area of Poland (Central Europe) at NUTS-2 level. The use of ANN enabled the modeling of the non-linear relations associated with the complex structure of electricity demand. Satellite data were collected for the period 2013–2016, and included images with improved quality (inter alia higher resolution), compared to the DMSP/OLS program. As images are available from April 2012 onwards, it is only recently that their number has become sufficient for ANN learning. The images were used to create models of multilayer perceptrons. The results achieved by ANN were compared with the results obtained using linear regressions. Studies have confirmed that electricity consumption can be determined with higher precision by the ANN method.  
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  ISSN 0360-5442 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2475  
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Author Park, Y.-M.M.; White, A.J.; Jackson, C.L.; Weinberg, C.R.; Sandler, D.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Association of Exposure to Artificial Light at Night While Sleeping With Risk of Obesity in Women Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication JAMA Internal Medicine Abbreviated Journal JAMA Intern Med  
  Volume (down) 179 Issue 8 Pages 1061-1071  
  Keywords Human Health; Obesity; Sleep  
  Abstract Importance: Short sleep has been associated with obesity, but to date the association between exposure to artificial light at night (ALAN) while sleeping and obesity is unknown. Objective: To determine whether ALAN exposure while sleeping is associated with the prevalence and risk of obesity. Design, Setting, and Participants: This baseline and prospective analysis included women aged 35 to 74 years enrolled in the Sister Study in all 50 US states and Puerto Rico from July 2003 through March 2009. Follow-up was completed on August 14, 2015. A total of 43722 women with no history of cancer or cardiovascular disease who were not shift workers, daytime sleepers, or pregnant at baseline were included in the analysis. Data were analyzed from September 1, 2017, through December 31, 2018. Exposures: Artificial light at night while sleeping reported at enrollment, categorized as no light, small nightlight in the room, light outside the room, and light or television in the room. Main Outcomes and Measures: Prevalent obesity at baseline was based on measured general obesity (body mass index [BMI] >/=30.0) and central obesity (waist circumference [WC] >/=88 cm, waist-to-hip ratio [WHR] >/=0.85, or waist-to-height ratio [WHtR]>/=0.5). To evaluate incident overweight and obesity, self-reported BMI at enrollment was compared with self-reported BMI at follow-up (mean [SD] follow-up, 5.7 [1.0] years). Generalized log-linear models with robust error variance were used to estimate multivariable-adjusted prevalence ratios (PRs) and relative risks (RRs) with 95% CIs for prevalent and incident obesity. Results: Among the population of 43 722 women (mean [SD] age, 55.4 [8.9] years), having any ALAN exposure while sleeping was positively associated with a higher prevalence of obesity at baseline, as measured using BMI (PR, 1.03; 95% CI, 1.02-1.03), WC (PR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.09-1.16), WHR (PR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.00-1.08), and WHtR (PR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.04-1.09), after adjusting for confounding factors, with P < .001 for trend for each measure. Having any ALAN exposure while sleeping was also associated with incident obesity (RR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.06-1.34). Compared with no ALAN, sleeping with a television or a light on in the room was associated with gaining 5 kg or more (RR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.08-1.27; P < .001 for trend), a BMI increase of 10% or more (RR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.02-1.26; P = .04 for trend), incident overweight (RR, 1.22; 95% CI,1.06-1.40; P = .03 for trend), and incident obesity (RR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.13-1.57; P < .001 for trend). Results were supported by sensitivity analyses and additional multivariable analyses including potential mediators such as sleep duration and quality, diet, and physical activity. Conclusions and Relevance: These results suggest that exposure to ALAN while sleeping may be a risk factor for weight gain and development of overweight or obesity. Further prospective and interventional studies could help elucidate this association and clarify whether lowering exposure to ALAN while sleeping can promote obesity prevention.  
  Address Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2168-6106 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31180469 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2525  
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Author Welz, P.-S.; Zinna, V.M.; Symeonidi, A.; Koronowski, K.B.; Kinouchi, K.; Smith, J.G.; Guillen, I.M.; Castellanos, A.; Crainiciuc, G.; Prats, N.; Caballero, J.M.; Hidalgo, A.; Sassone-Corsi, P.; Benitah, S.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title BMAL1-Driven Tissue Clocks Respond Independently to Light to Maintain Homeostasis Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Cell Abbreviated Journal Cell  
  Volume (down) 177 Issue 6 Pages 1436-1447.e12  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Circadian rhythms control organismal physiology throughout the day. At the cellular level, clock regulation is established by a self-sustained Bmal1-dependent transcriptional oscillator network. However, it is still unclear how different tissues achieve a synchronized rhythmic physiology. That is, do they respond independently to environmental signals, or require interactions with each other to do so? We show that unexpectedly, light synchronizes the Bmal1-dependent circadian machinery in single tissues in the absence of Bmal1 in all other tissues. Strikingly, light-driven tissue autonomous clocks occur without rhythmic feeding behavior and are lost in constant darkness. Importantly, tissue-autonomous Bmal1 partially sustains homeostasis in otherwise arrhythmic and prematurely aging animals. Our results therefore support a two-branched model for the daily synchronization of tissues: an autonomous response branch, whereby light entrains circadian clocks without any commitment of other Bmal1-dependent clocks, and a memory branch using other Bmal1-dependent clocks to “remember” time in the absence of external cues.  
  Address Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona), Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, 08028 Barcelona, Spain; ICREA, Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies, 08010 Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: salvador.aznar-benitah@irbbarcelona.org  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0092-8674 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31150620 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2513  
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Author Touitou, Y.; Reinberg, A.; Touitou, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Association between light at night, melatonin secretion, sleep deprivation, and the internal clock: Health impacts and mechanisms of circadian disruption Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Life Sciences Abbreviated Journal Life Sci  
  Volume (down) 173 Issue Pages 94-106  
  Keywords Human Health; Review  
  Abstract Exposure to Artificial Light At Night (ALAN) results in a disruption of the circadian system, which is deleterious to health. In industrialized countries, 75% of the total workforce is estimated to have been involved in shift work and night work. Epidemiologic studies, mainly of nurses, have revealed an association between sustained night work and a 50-100% higher incidence of breast cancer. The potential and multifactorial mechanisms of the effects include the suppression of melatonin secretion by ALAN, sleep deprivation, and circadian disruption. Shift and/or night work generally decreases the time spent sleeping, and it disrupts the circadian time structure. In the long run, this desynchronization is detrimental to health, as underscored by a large number of epidemiological studies that have uncovered elevated rates of several diseases, including cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular risks, obesity, mood disorders and age-related macular degeneration. It amounts to a public health issue in the light of the very substantial number of individuals involved. The IARC has classified shift work in group 2A of “probable carcinogens to humans” since “they involve a circadian disorganization”. Countermeasures to the effects of ALAN, such as melatonin, bright light, or psychotropic drugs, have been proposed as a means to combat circadian clock disruption and improve adaptation to shift and night work. We review the evidence for the ALAN impacts on health. Furthermore, we highlight the importance of an in-depth mechanistic understanding to combat the detrimental properties of exposure to ALAN and develop strategies of prevention.  
  Address UHSA – Groupe Hospitalier Paul Guiraud, 54, avenue de la Republique, 94806 Villejuif, France  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0024-3205 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28214594 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2455  
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