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Author Garrett, J. K., Donald, P. F., & Gaston, K. J.
Title Skyglow extends into the world’s Key Biodiversity Areas Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2019 Publication Animal Conservation Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages cv.12480
Keywords Skyglow; Conservation; Biodiversity; Key Biodiversity Area; KBA
Abstract The proportion of the Earth’s surface that experiences a naturally dark environment at night is rapidly declining with the introduction of artificial light. Biological impacts of this change have been documented from genes to ecosystems, and for a wide diversity of environments and organisms. The likely severity of these impacts depends heavily on the relationship between the distribution of artificial night-time lighting and biodiversity. Here, we carry out a global assessment of the overlap between areas of conservation priority and the most recent atlas of artificial skyglow. We show that of the world’s Key Biodiversity Areas (KBAs), less than a third have completely pristine night-time skies, about a half lie entirely under artificially bright skies and only about a fifth contain no area in which night-time skies are not polluted to the zenith. The extent of light pollution of KBAs varies by region, affecting the greatest proportion of KBAs in Europe and the Middle East. Statistical modelling revealed associations between light pollution within KBAs and associated levels of both gross domestic product and human population density. This suggests that these patterns will worsen with continued economic development and growth in the human population
Address Environment & Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, UK; j.k.garrett(at)exeter.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2309
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Author Frank, T. M., Gabbert, W. C., Chaves-Campos, J., & LaVal, R. K.
Title Impact of artificial lights on foraging of insectivorous bats in a Costa Rican cloud forest Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2019 Publication Journal of Tropical Ecology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 35 Issue 1 Pages 8-17
Keywords Animals
Abstract Determining the effects of light pollution on tropical bat communities is important for understanding community assembly rules in urban areas. Studies from temperate regions suggest that, among aerial insectivorous bats, fast-flying species that forage in the open are attracted to artificial lights, whereas slow-flying species that forage in cluttered environments avoid those lights. We measured aerial insectivore responses to light pollution in a tropical cloud forest to test this hypothesis. Bat echolocation was recorded at 20 pairs of light and dark sites in Monteverde, Costa Rica. Foraging activity was higher at artificially lighted sites than dark sites near the new moon, especially around blue-white fluorescent lighting. Most recorded bat species showed increased or unchanged activity in response to light, including some slow-flying and edge-foraging bats. This finding suggests that, contrary to the evaluated hypothesis, flight speed and foraging mode are not sufficient to determine bat responses to artificial lights in the tropics. Two bat species showed decreased activity at light sites, and a low species evenness was recorded around lights, particularly fluorescent lights, compared with dark sites. As in the temperate zone, light pollution in the tropics seems to concentrate certain bat species around human-inhabited areas, potentially shifting community structure.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2311
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Author Gong, P.; Li, X.; Zhang, W.
Title 40-year (1978-2017) human settlement changes in China reflected by impervious surfaces from satellite remote sensing Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2019 Publication Science Bulletin Abbreviated Journal Science Bulletin
Volume 64 Issue 11 Pages 756-763
Keywords Remote Sensing; China; human settlement
Abstract Impervious surfaces are the most significant feature of human settlements. Timely, accurate, and frequent information on impervious surfaces is critical in both social-economic and natural environment applications. Over the past 40 years, impervious surface areas in China have grown rapidly. However, annual maps of impervious areas in China with high spatial details do not exist during this period. In this paper, we made use of reliable impervious surface mapping algorithms that we published before and the Google Earth Engine (GEE) platform to address this data gap. With available data in GEE, we were able to map impervious surfaces over the entire country circa 1978, and during 1985-2017 at an annual frequency. The 1978 data were at 60 m resolution, while the 1985-2017 data were in 30 m resolution. For the 30 m resolution data, we evaluated the accuracies for 1985, 1990, 1995, 2000, 2005, 2010, and 2015. Overall accuracies reached more than 90%. Our results indicate that the growth of impervious surface in China was not only fast but also considerably exceeding the per capita impervious surface area in developed countries like Japan. The 40-year continuous and consistent impervious surface distribution data in China would generate widespread interests in the research and policy-making community. The impervious surface data can be freely downloaded from http://data.ess.tsinghua.edu.cn.
Address Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Earth System Modeling, Department of Earth System Science, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China; penggong(at)tsinghua.edu.cn
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2095-9273 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2321
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Author Mindel, J.W.; Rojas, S.L.; Kline, D.; Bao, S.; Rezai, A.; Corrigan, J.D.; Nelson, R.J.; D, P.; Magalang, U.J.
Title 0038 Sleeping with Low Levels of Artificial Light at Night Increases Systemic Inflammation in Humans Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2019 Publication Sleep Abbreviated Journal
Volume 42 Issue Supplement_1 Pages A15-A16
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Introduction

Artificial light at night (ALAN) has become a ubiquitous part of our society. Animal studies have shown that ALAN exposure promotes a depressive-like mood and increases peripheral inflammation likely due to circadian disruption. We hypothesized that sleeping with ALAN will increase systemic inflammation in humans.

Methods

We enrolled 64 subjects [32 with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) adherent to treatment and 32 without sleep disorders] in a randomized, crossover study to determine the effects of sleeping with ALAN (40 lux) or the usual dark condition (control) for 7 nights at home. Sleeping with ALAN was confirmed by an actigraph with an ambient light sensor. Outcome measurements were done at baseline and after sleeping in each condition. The primary outcome was changes in the high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels. Secondary outcomes include scores on the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire-10 (FOSQ-10), and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS); Psychomotor Vigilance Testing (PVT); actigraphic sleep measures; and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). A random effects linear regression model was used to assess differences adjusting for schedule, visit, and baseline levels. Post-hoc analyses combined results from OSA and non-OSA subjects.

Results

Fifty-eight (30 OSA and 28 non-OSA) subjects, aged 38.4±14.9 years, 33 of whom are male completed the protocol. A log transformation was used so the difference in hsCRP was expressed as a mean ratio. In the combined analysis, the mean hsCRP was 39% higher with ALAN than control (mean ratio=1.39; 95% CI: 1.08-1.80; p=0.012). The effects of ALAN for OSA and non-OSA subjects were not different. ALAN increased the CES-D score by 1.81 (p=0.017) and ESS score by 0.62 (p=0.071) points, and decreased the FOSQ-10 score by 0.36 (p=0.038) points while the PSQI score was unchanged (p=0.860). There were no significant differences in the PVT values, actigraphic sleep measures, or HOMA-IR.

Conclusion

Sleeping with ALAN for seven days significantly increased hsCRP levels and modestly increased depression scores in humans.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0161-8105 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2322
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Author Dhaliwal, S.S.; Keller, J.; Le, H.-N.; Lewin, D.S.
Title Sleep Disturbance among Pregnant Women: The Influence of Environmental and Contextual Factors Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2019 Publication Sleep Abbreviated Journal
Volume 42 Issue Supplement_1 Pages A270-A271
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Introduction

Disrupted sleep during pregnancy affects nearly 85% of women. This can contribute to psychological distress and antenatal depression. The aims of the current project were to test whether (a) poorer subjective sleep quality contributed to greater depression and anxiety symptoms, and (b) contextual factors predicted clinically significant sleep disturbance after adjusting for socioeconomic status (SES).

Methods

In a mixed-methods study, 418 pregnant women (age: M=32.4 years; gestation: M=28.4 weeks, SD=8.4 weeks; 58% Black) completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), measures of pregnancy-related physiological factors, and provided details about their sleep environment. They also rated perinatal depression, anxiety, and SES (Hollingshead and MacArthur Ladder). Sixty-two women completed these measures again later in pregnancy (gestation M = 34.2 weeks). A subset of seven women underwent actigraphy (9-nights) during their third trimester. Logistic regressions adjusted for age, BMI, race, sleep disordered breathing, and gestational week.

Results

Subjective sleep quality was significantly poorer among Black women and those with higher BMI. Physiological factors (i.e., restless leg syndrome, nocturnal urination, and acid reflux) explained subjective sleep disturbance after accounting for gestational week (ps<.01). Among women with history of psychopathology (n=221), sleep disturbance was significantly related to anxiety and depression symptoms (ps<.01), with greater sleep disturbance (PSQI score >5) predicting clinically significant antenatal depression (B = .38, p<.05). However, those who rated their social standing as higher reported lower sleep disturbance throughout pregnancy, even after adjusting for mood and anxiety (B= .86, SE =.41; p<.05). There was a dose-response positive association between sleep disturbance and depression severity among Black women only (B = .89; p<.05). Among lower SES Black women, environmental factors (greater ambient noise and light pollution) partially mediated this effect (B= .45, SE =.17; p<.01).

Conclusion

Sociocontextual factors may explain sleep disturbance severity among low-income pregnant Black women, above and beyond traditional metrics of SES. Higher subjective SES may be protective against sleep disturbance and psychiatric distress. Assessments of sleep during pregnancy should account for physiological considerations and environmental disruptions, alongside mood and anxiety.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0161-8105 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2323
Permanent link to this record