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Author Wu, Y.; Gui, S.-Y.; Fang, Y.; Zhang, M.; Hu, C.-Y.
Title Exposure to outdoor light at night and risk of breast cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2021 Publication Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987) Abbreviated Journal Environ Pollut
Volume 269 Issue Pages 116114
Keywords Human health; *Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology; Case-Control Studies; Cohort Studies; Female; Humans; *Light/adverse effects; Prospective Studies; Breast cancer; Light at night; Meta-analysis; Systematic review
Abstract Recent epidemiological studies have explored effects of light at night (LAN) exposure on breast cancer, but reported inconsistent findings. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of available evidence regarding the association of LAN assessed by satellite data with breast cancer. We conducted a systematic PubMed, Web of Science, and EMBASE database literature search until August 2020. Random-effects meta-analysis was applied to synthesis risk estimates. Heterogeneity was measured using statistics of Cochran's Q, I(2), and Tau(2) (tau(2)). We assessed publication bias through funnel plot and Egger's test. Moreover, subgroup analyses according to study design and menopausal status were performed. Risk of bias (RoB) of each included study was assessed using a domain-based RoB assessment tool. The confidence in the body of evidence was appraised using the GRADE approach for level-of-evidence translation. A total of 1157 studies were identified referring to LAN and breast cancer, from which 6 were included for quantitative synthesis. We found a significantly higher odds of breast cancer in the highest versus the lowest category of LAN exposure (OR = 1.11, 95% CI: 1.06, 1.16; I(2) = 0.0%). In the subgroup analyses stratified by menopausal status and study design, significant association was found in postmenopausal women (OR = 1.07, 95% CI = 1.00, 1.13) and cohort studies (OR = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.05, 1.18), while the summary estimates of premenopausal women and case-control studies showed no significance. The level of evidence for the association of LAN exposure and breast cancer risk was graded as “moderate” with “probably low” RoB according to the NTP/OHAT framework. In conclusion, this study suggests a link of LAN exposure with risk of breast cancer. Further high-quality prospective studies, especially performed in low-to middle-income countries with improvement in the area of LAN exposure assessment are needed to advance this field.
Address Department of Humanistic Medicine, School of Humanistic Medicine, Anhui Medical University, 81 Meishan Road, Hefei 230032, China; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Anhui Medical University, 81 Meishan Road, Hefei 230032, China. Electronic address: cy.hu@ahmu.edu.cn
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:33280921 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3384
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Author Anand, A.; Kim, D.-H.
Title Pandemic Induced Changes in Economic Activity around African Protected Areas Captured through Night-Time Light Data Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2021 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 13 Issue 2 Pages 314
Keywords Economics; VIIRS; night-time lights; COVID-19; pandemic; protected areas; wildlife tourism
Abstract The importance of tourism for development is widely recognized. Travel restrictions imposed to contain the spread of COVID-19 have brought tourism to a halt. Tourism is one of the key sectors driving change in Africa and is based exclusively on natural assets, with wildlife being the main attraction. Economic activities, therefore, are clustered around conservation and protected areas. We used night-time light data as a proxy measure for economic activity to assess change due to the pandemic. Our analysis shows that overall, 75 percent of the 8427 protected areas saw a decrease in light intensity in varying degrees in all countries and across IUCN protected area categories, including in popular protected area destinations, indicating a reduction in tourism-related economic activities. As countries discuss COVID-19 recovery, the methods using spatially explicit data illustrated in this paper can assess the extent of change, inform decision-making, and prioritize recovery efforts.
Address Independent Evaluation Office, Global Environment Facility, Washington, DC 20006, USA; aanand2 ( at ) thegef.org
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher MDPI Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3390
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Author Hannibal, J.
Title Action of Light on the Neuroendocrine Axis Type Book Chapter
Year (down) 2021 Publication Neuroendocrine Clocks and Calendars Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Human Health; Photoentrainment; circadian rhythm; Neuroendocrine Axis; neuroendocrine system; hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis; hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis; hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis; artificial light at night
Abstract Photoentrainment of the circadian clock located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is fundamental for the stable regulation of neuroendocrine function underlying physiological functions such as metabolism, sleep, immune responses, and reproduction. Masking by light directly suppresses melatonin secretion independent of the circadian system, with impact on several neuroendocrine axes. This chapter describes recent findings in anatomy and physiology on how light mediates its effects on SCN-regulated timing of the neuroendocrine system, including the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis, the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, and melatonin and arginine-vasopressin (AVP) secretion. In modern societies, artificial light at night (ALAN) seems to affect circadian and neuroendocrine systems, and should be considered in the understanding the health problems of the industrialized human population.
Address Department of Clinical Biochemistry Bispebjerg Frederiksberg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; j.hannibal ( at ) dadlnet.dk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Ebling F.J.P., Piggins H.D. Series Title Masterclass in Neuroendocrinology Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume 10 Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3411
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Author Zheng, Y.; Zhou, Q.; He, Y.; Wang, C.; Wang, X.; Wang, H.
Title An Optimized Approach for Extracting Urban Land Based on Log-Transformed DMSP-OLS Nighttime Light, NDVI, and NDWI Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2021 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 13 Issue 4 Pages 766
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Quantitative and accurate urban land information on regional and global scales is urgently required for studying socioeconomic and eco-environmental problems. The spatial distribution of urban land is a significant part of urban development planning, which is vital for optimizing land use patterns and promoting sustainable urban development. Composite nighttime light (NTL) data from the Defense Meteorological Program Operational Line-Scan System (DMSP-OLS) have been proven to be effective for extracting urban land. However, the saturation and blooming within the DMSP-OLS NTL hinder its capacity to provide accurate urban information. This paper proposes an optimized approach that combines NTL with multiple index data to overcome the limitations of extracting urban land based only on NTL data. We combined three sources of data, the DMSP-OLS, the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), and the normalized difference water index (NDWI), to establish a novel approach called the vegetation–water-adjusted NTL urban index (VWANUI), which is used to rapidly extract urban land areas on regional and global scales. The results show that the proposed approach reduces the saturation of DMSP-OLS and essentially eliminates blooming effects. Next, we developed regression models based on the normalized DMSP-OLS, the human settlement index (HSI), the vegetation-adjusted NTL urban index (VANUI), and the VWANUI to analyze and estimate urban land areas. The results show that the VWANUI regression model provides the highest performance of all the models tested. To summarize, the VWANUI reduces saturation and blooming, and improves the accuracy with which urban areas are extracted, thereby providing valuable support and decision-making references for designing sustainable urban development.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3416
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Author Baddiley, C.
Title Light pollution colour changes at MHAONB, from distant town conversions to blue-rich LED lighting, implications for rural UK skies Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2021 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer
Volume in press Issue Pages 107574
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract The sky in the Malvern Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (MHAONB) has been monitored continually since 2012, when a dark sky survey of the area was carried out commissioned by Malvern Hills Conservators. Ever since then at F.C.Mathon, the sky brightness has been measured continually, in the last few years at minute intervals in all weathers. On the darkest of nights, a fisheye lensed camera was used at the same intervals. There is a trend in brightness distribution and colour changes on the sky, especially towards the horizon, with clearly separated bright sky domes. The sky quality meter (SQM) photometry data near zenith does not show any great change. In 2015, Malvern Hills Conservators commissioned the author for modelling of the effect on the MHAONB sky, of the ongoing blue rich LED re-lighting throughout Herefordshire.

The SQM photometry shows the sky brightness are very weather dependent; and the camera shows colour changes from orange-pink to blue-rich LEDs. Besides the trend over recent years to blue white from orange, changes can occur over hours or even minutes, depending on cloud cover over individual towns on or beyond the horizon, and local humidity levels. It can vary from orange to blue and red. Clear skies can vary in overall colour from one night to another and brightness falls overnight. This is shown in isophotes and accurate profile curve fitting. The effect of 2020 lockdown is included. A measurement was made of the clear air back scatter ratio from a known luminance source which can be used to estimate the sky visibility degradation from any planned lighting scheme.

For the rural UK, the Milky Way is only 20% contrast to background at zenith on the darkest nights, (MHAONB 21.10 mag.arcsec-2), doubling the road light level across Europe would make it invisible.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3417
Permanent link to this record