|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Khan, S.; Yong, V.W.; Xue, M.
Title Circadian disruption in mice through chronic jetlag-like conditions modulates molecular profiles of cancer in nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2021 Publication Carcinogenesis Abbreviated Journal Carcinogenesis
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals; Brain activity; Cancer pathways; Chronic jetlag (CJL); Metabolic pathways; Shiftwork
Abstract Biological rhythms regulate physiological activities. Shiftwork disrupts normal circadian rhythms and may increase the risk of cancer through unknown mechanisms. To mimic environmental light/dark changes encountered by shift workers, a protocol called “chronic jet lag (CJL)” induced by repeatedly shifting light-dark cycles has been used. Here, we subjected mice to CJL by advancing light-dark cycle by 6 hours every 2 days, and conducted RNA sequencing to analyze the expression profile and molecular signature in the brain areas of prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. We also performed positron emission tomography (PET) imaging to monitor changes related to glucose metabolism in brain. Our results reveal systematic reprogramming of gene expression associated with cancer related pathways and metabolic pathways in prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. PET imaging indicates that glucose uptake level was significantly reduced in whole brain as well as the individual brain regions. Moreover, qPCR analysis describes that the expression levels of cancer related genes were altered in prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. Overall, these results suggest a molecular and metabolic link with CJL mediated cancer risk, and generate hypotheses on how CJL increases the susceptibility to cancer.
Address Henan Medical Key Laboratory of Translational Cerebrovascular Diseases, Zhengzhou, Henan, China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0143-3334 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:33608694 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3421
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Krupiński, R.
Title Simulation and Analysis of Floodlighting Based on 3D Computer Graphics Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2021 Publication Energies Abbreviated Journal Energies
Volume 14 Issue 4 Pages 1042
Keywords Lighting; Planning
Abstract The paper presents the opportunities to apply computer graphics in an object floodlighting design process and in an analysis of object illumination. The course of object floodlighting design has been defined based on a virtual three-dimensional geometric model. The problems related to carrying out the analysis of lighting, calculating the average illuminance, luminance levels and determining the illuminated object surface area are also described. These parameters are directly tied with the calculations of the Floodlighting Utilisation Factor, and therefore, with the energy efficiency of the design as well as the aspects of light pollution of the natural environment. The paper shows how high an impact of the geometric model of the object has on the accuracy of photometric calculations. Very often the model contains the components that should not be taken into account in the photometric calculations. The research on what influence the purity of the geometric mesh of the illuminated object has on the obtained results is presented. It shows that the errors can be significant, but it is possible to optimise the 3D object model appropriately in order to receive the precise results. For the example object presented in this paper, removing the planes that do not constitute its external surface has caused a two-fold increase in the average illuminance and average luminance. This is dangerous because a designer who wants to achieve a specific average luminance level in their design without optimizing the model will obtain the luminance values that will actually be much higher.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1996-1073 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3422
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kupprat, F.; Holker, F.; Knopf, K.; Preuer, T.; Kloas, W.
Title Innate immunity, oxidative stress, and body indices of Eurasian perch Perca fluviatilis after two weeks of exposure to artificial light at night Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2021 Publication Journal of Fish Biology Abbreviated Journal J Fish Biol
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals; Alan; fish; freshwater; light pollution; non-specific immune system; skyglow
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) can disrupt biological rhythms of fish and other vertebrates by changing the light information of the nocturnal environment. Disrupted biorhythms can impair the immune system of vertebrates as it has been shown for conditions with continuous illumination or long-day photoperiod in many vertebrates, including fish. However, this has not been shown so far under typical ALAN scenarios with high light intensities during day and low light intensities at night. Therefore, we measured proxies for the innate immune system and oxidative stress as well as body indices of Eurasian perch Perca fluviatilis under a wide range of intensities of nocturnal illumination. We found no changes in parameters of the innate immune system and no significant changes in proxies for oxidative stress after two-week exposures to nocturnal illuminance ranging from 0.01 lx to 1 lx in one experiment or from 1 lx to 100 lx in a second experiment. A decrease in the hepatosomatic index at the highest tested light intensity of 100 lx compared to the dark control was the only significant difference in all parameters among treatments. After two weeks of exposure, ALAN does not seem to seriously challenge the innate immune system and seems to cause less oxidative stress than expected. Our results contradict findings from other studies applying continuous illumination or long-day photoperiod and highlight the importance of further research in this field. Since ALAN represents a sustained modulation of the environment that may have cumulative effects over time, long-term studies are required for a better understanding of how ALAN modulates the health of fish. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Address Faculty of Life Sciences, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-1112 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:33587288 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3423
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Nuñez, J.D.; Bas, C.C.; Pérez García, M.; Ocampo, E.H.; Ribeiro, P.D.; Luppi, T.A.
Title Artificial light at night may increase the predation pressure in a salt marsh keystone species Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2021 Publication Marine Environmental Research Abbreviated Journal Marine Environmental Research
Volume in press Issue Pages 105285
Keywords Animals
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) has the potential to alter ecological processes such as the natural dynamics of predator-prey interactions. Although understanding of ALAN effect on faunal groups has increased in recent years, few studies have explicitly tested for direct consequences of ALAN on predator-prey systems. Here, we evaluated the effect of ALAN on juvenile mortality due to cannibalism and general predation of the South American intertidal burrowing crab Neohelice granulata, a key ecosystem engineer of salt marshes. For this, we conducted tethering and crab enclosure experiments for both night and day periods during successive tidal floods in a semidiurnal tidal regime. Both experimental approaches were deployed simultaneously in the field and they lasted four consecutive days during new moon nights. ALAN was simulated by a white LED lamp (30W) with a solar panel as a source of power in five separated areas selected as replicates. For general predation, juvenile survival under ALAN was 44% lower than during the daytime and 61% lower than under natural dark conditions. For cannibalism, juvenile survival under ALAN and during the daytime was similar and about 30% lower than under natural dark conditions. We also found that the abundance of adult male crabs (cannibals) under ALAN was nearly five times higher than at natural dark conditions. Our field experiments provide evidence that ALAN can increase the mortality of juvenile crabs and is at least partially driven by cannibalistic interactions.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0141-1136 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3424
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Haynes, K.J.; Robertson, B.A.
Title A transdisciplinary research agenda for understanding insect responses to ecological light pollution informed by evolutionary trap theory Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2021 Publication Current Opinion in Insect Science Abbreviated Journal Curr Opin Insect Sci
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals; Ecology
Abstract Evolutionary traps are phenomena in which rapid environmental change causes environmental cues that historically guided adaptive behavioral or life-history decisions to become poor predictors of the consequences of such decisions for an organism's fitness. Evolutionary trap theory offers an ideal framework for understanding and mitigating the effects of ecological light pollution (ELP) on insects. We emphasize the utility of an evolutionary trap perspective in demonstrating the importance of an integrated understanding of the sensory, behavioral, evolutionary, and demographic mechanisms underlying insect responses to ELP. We also highlight neglected areas of research where greater focus can help enhance understanding of how ELP affects the persistence, evolutionary trajectory, and population dynamics of insects across space and time.
Address Division of Science, Mathematics and Computing, Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, New York 12504, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2214-5753 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:33601058 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3427
Permanent link to this record