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Author Quintanilla-Ahumada, D.; Quijon, P.A.; Pulgar, J.; Manriquez, P.H.; Garcia-Huidobro, M.R.; Duarte, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Exposure to artificial light at night (ALAN) alters RNA:DNA ratios in a sandy beach coleopteran insect Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2021 Publication Marine Pollution Bulletin Abbreviated Journal Mar Pollut Bull  
  Volume 165 Issue Pages 112132  
  Keywords Animals; Phalerisida maculata; RNA:DNA ratio; Sandy beach ecosystems  
  Abstract Coastal habitats worldwide, including sandy beaches, are becoming increasingly exposed to Artificial Light at Night (ALAN). Despite the spread of this global stressor, research assessing ALAN potential impacts remain scarce, particularly at the molecular level. This study addressed this gap by assessing the influence of ALAN on the physiological condition of the sandy beach insect Phalerisida maculata Kulzer (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae). RNA:DNA ratios were used here as a proxy of the insect's nutritional condition in laboratory trials that lasted 20 d. Insects were exposed to two representative ALAN conditions (either 60 or 120 lx) and compared with those maintained in a natural daylight/night cycle (0 lx at nigth; control). After the trial, organisms from each treatment were frozen in liquid nitrogen and standard protocols were followed to estimate RNA, DNA and RNA:DNA ratios. Estimates of RNA:DNA ratios from insects maintained in control conditions were significantly higher (P < 0.05) than those from insects exposed to ALAN. The reduced nutritional condition of insects exposed to light pollution is explained by the lower in situ biosynthetic capacity in these organisms resulting from a reduction in their feeding. ALAN likely altered P. maculata normal locomotor activity, which takes place primarily at night, forcing the insects to remain buried in the sand for extended periods of time. As ALAN continues to spread along coastlines worldwide, there is a likelihood of growing impacts on these and other species living on sandy beaches and other coastal habitats.  
  Address Departamento de Ecologia y Biodiversidad, Facultad de Ciencias de la Vida, Universidad Andres Bello, Santiago, Chile; Centro de Investigacion Marina Quintay (CIMARQ), Facultad de Ciencias de la Vida, Universidad Andres Bello, Santiago, Chile. Electronic address: cristian.duarte@unab.cl  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0025-326X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:33607454 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3428  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Martin, J.S.; Laberge, L.; Sasseville, A.; Berube, M.; Alain, S.; Lavoie, J.; Houle, J.; Hebert, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Timely use of in-car dim blue light and blue blockers in the morning does not improve circadian adaptation of fast rotating shift workers Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2021 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Human Health; Adaptation to shift and night work; blue blocker glasses; circadian misalignment; light exposure; melatonin; sleep; sleepiness/alertness  
  Abstract Circadian adaptation to night work usually does not occur in naturalistic conditions, largely due to exposure to low levels of light during the night and light in the morning on the way home. This leads to circadian misalignment, which has documented deleterious effects on sleep and functioning during waking hours. Chronic circadian misalignment is also being increasingly associated with long-term health comorbidities. As the circadian system is mostly sensitive to short wavelengths (i.e., blue light) and less sensitive to long wavelengths (i.e., red light), shaping light exposure in a “wavelength-wise” manner has been proposed to promote partial adaptation to night shifts, and, therefore, alleviate circadian rhythms disruption. This report presents results from two cross-over designed studies that aimed to investigate the effects of three different light conditions on circadian phase, sleepiness, and alertness of police patrol officers on a rotating shift schedule. The first study took place during summer (n = 15) and the second study (n = 25) during winter/early spring. In both studies, all participants went through three conditions composed of four consecutive night shifts: 1) in-car dim blue light exposure during the night shift and wearing of blue-blocking glasses (BBG) in the morning after 05:00 h; 2) in-car red light exposure during the night shift and wearing of BBG in the morning after 05:00 h; 3) a control condition with no intervention. To assess circadian phase position, salivary melatonin was collected hourly the night before and the night after each condition. Sleep was monitored by wrist actigraphy. Also, a 10-min Psychomotor Vigilance-Task was administered at the beginning and end of each night shift and the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale was completed every 2 h during each night shift. In the summer study, no difference was found in alertness and sleepiness between conditions. Participants though exhibited greater ( approximately 3 h) phase delay after four consecutive night shifts in the control condition (in which morning light exposure was expected to prevent phase delay) than after the blue and red conditions ( approximately 2 h) (in which wearing BBG were expected to promote phase delay). In the second study performed during the winter/early spring, a comparable approximately 2 h phase delay was found in each of the three conditions, with no difference in alertness and sleepiness between conditions. In conclusion, participants in both studies exhibited modest phase delay across the four night shifts, even during the control conditions. Still, re-entrainment was not fast enough to produce partial circadian adaptation after four night shifts. A greater number of consecutive night shifts may be necessary to produce enough circadian alignment to elicit benefits on sleepiness and alertness in workers driving a motorized vehicle during night shifts. In-car dim blue light exposure combined with the wearing of BBG in the morning did not show the expected benefits on circadian adaptation, sleepiness, and alertness in our studies. Higher levels of light may be warranted when implementing light intervention in a motorized vehicle setting.  
  Address Departement d'ophtalmologie et ORL-chirurgie Cervico-faciale, Universite Laval , Quebec, Quebec, Canada  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:33588653 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3429  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yang, M.; Hu, F.; Leng, X.; Chi, X.; Yin, D.; Ding, J.; Li, X.; Zuo, R.; Chang, Y.; Zhao, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Long-term effects of light spectra on fitness related behaviors and growth of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus intermedius Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2021 Publication Aquaculture Abbreviated Journal Aquaculture  
  Volume 537 Issue Pages 736518  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract The appropriate light spectrum for reseeding small sea urchins is crucial for stock enhancement. Here, we investigated righting, foraging behavior and growth of small sea urchins Strongylocentrotus intermedius exposed to five light spectra (blue light: 440–490 nm, green light: 510–550 nm, red light: 630–670 nm, yellow light: 570–600 nm and white light) for 60 days. In the present study, S. intermedius exposed to red light had a smaller test diameter than those exposed to other light spectra (P < 0.05). No significant difference of daily weight gain was found among light spectra groups (P > 0.05). Consistently, the lantern length and weight of S. intermedius under red light were smallest among five light spectra. These results indicate that red light significantly inhibits the growth of S. intermedius. The successful foraging proportion showed no significant difference among the five light spectra (P > 0.05). Righting response time and foraging time, however, were significantly higher in S. intermedius under blue light than those exposed to other light spectra (both P < 0.01). This highlights the importance and necessity of kelp beds and shelters at the reseeding site to avoid the long-term effects of blue light on foraging and righting behaviors.  
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  ISSN 0044-8486 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3430  
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Author Pajot, A.; Corbeau, A.; Jambon, A.; Weimerskirch, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Diel at‐sea activity of two species of great albatrosses: the ontogeny of foraging and movement behaviour Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2021 Publication Journal of Avian Biology Abbreviated Journal J Avian Biol  
  Volume 52 Issue 2 Pages  
  Keywords Moonlight; Animals  
  Abstract The first year of life is a period of high mortality in animals. Reduced foraging capacities of naive individuals might be the primary cause of their mortality. These capacities are supposed to be progressively acquired during the first months of life. In this study, we investigate the ontogeny of flight capacities, by day and night, of first‐year individuals, and compare it with adults from two closely related species of great albatrosses: Amsterdam Diomedea amsterdamensis and wandering Diomedea exulans albatrosses which forage in different environmental conditions. We used 71 tracks of 71 juvenile birds and 141 of 116 incubating adults to compare both age categories. In order to explore the effect of moon light on night activity, we elaborated a new formula which improves the precision of the proxy of moon illumination. By day, we found that juveniles of both species reach some adult foraging capacities in less than two months. By night, albatrosses have reduced activity increasing during the first weeks at sea for juveniles and changing in accordance with moon illumination for both juveniles and adults. A peak of flight activity at dawn and dusk was apparent for both species. Interspecific comparison underlined that Amsterdam albatrosses were more active than wandering albatrosses, suggesting a difference in food and foraging strategy. Overall, we highlighted how life history traits, environmental conditions and time of the day affect the foraging activity of two related species of seabirds.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0908-8857 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3431  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gibson, J.; Olivia, S.; Boe-Gibson, G.; Li, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Which night lights data should we use in economics, and where? Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2021 Publication Journal of Development Economics Abbreviated Journal Journal of Development Economics  
  Volume 149 Issue Pages 102602  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Popular DMSP night lights data are flawed by blurring, top-coding, and lack of calibration. Yet newer and better VIIRS data are rarely used in economics. We compare these two data sources for predicting GDP, especially at the second subnational level, for Indonesia, China and South Africa. The DMSP data are a poor proxy for GDP outside of cities. The gap in predictive performance between DMSP data and VIIRS data is especially apparent at lower levels of the spatial hierarchy, such as for counties, and for lower density areas. The city lights-GDP relationship is twice as noisy with DMSP data than with VIIRS data. Spatial inequality is considerably understated with DMSP data, especially for the urban sector and in higher density areas. A Pareto adjustment to correct for top-coding in DMSP data has a modest effect but still understates spatial inequality and misses key features of economic activity in big cities.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0304-3878 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3432  
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