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Author Ritonja, J.; McIsaac, M.A.; Sanders, E.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Grundy, A.; Cordina-Duverger, E.; Spinelli, J.J.; Aronson, K.J.
Title Outdoor light at night at residences and breast cancer risk in Canada Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2020 Publication European Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Eur J Epidemiol
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Human Health; Breast cancer; Case-control study; Circadian disruption; Light at night; Night work; Women's health
Abstract Experimental and epidemiologic studies suggest that light at night (LAN) exposure disrupts circadian rhythm, and this disruption may increase breast cancer risk. We investigated the potential association between residential outdoor LAN and breast cancer risk. A population-based case-control study was conducted in Vancouver, British Columbia and Kingston, Ontario, Canada with incident breast cancer cases, and controls frequency matched by age in the same region. This analysis was restricted to 844 cases and 905 controls who provided lifetime residential histories. Using time-weighted average duration at each home 5-20 years prior to study entry, two measures of cumulative average outdoor LAN were calculated using two satellite data sources. Logistic regression was used to estimate the relationship between outdoor LAN and breast cancer risk, considering interactions for menopausal status and night shift work. We found no association between residential outdoor LAN and breast cancer for either measure of LAN [OR comparing highest vs. lowest tertile (DNB) = 0.95, 95% CI 0.70-1.27]. We also found no association when considering interactions for menopausal status and past/current night work status. These findings were robust to changes to years of residential data considered, residential mobility, and longer exposure windows. Our findings are consistent with studies reporting that outdoor LAN has a small effect or no effect on breast cancer risk.
Address Division of Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Cancer Research Institute, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada. aronson@queensu.ca
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0393-2990 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32026169 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2826
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Author Kyba, C.C.M.; Conrad, J.; Shatwell, T.
Title Lunar illuminated fraction is a poor proxy for moonlight exposure Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2020 Publication Nature Ecology & Evolution Abbreviated Journal Nat Ecol Evol
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals; Moonlight; Commentary
Abstract San-Jose et al. recently demonstrated that the colouration of barn owls impacts their hunting success under moonlit conditions, and therefore affects their reproductive success1. They found that near full-moon conditions, the youngest nestlings with white fathers were fed more and were likelier to survive than those with redder fathers. While the study is interesting, the percentage of the Moon that is illuminated (lunar illuminated fraction) is unfortunately a poor proxy for moonlight exposure. We suggest that lunar illluminated fraction should, in general, never be used in biological studies, as alternative variables such as horizontal illuminance better represent moonlight exposure, and therefore offer a greater chance of detecting the effects of moonlight. Here, we provide a brief explanation of how moonlight varies with season and time of night, and stress the need for greater collaboration between biologists and astronomers or physicists in such studies in the future.
Address Seenforschung, Helmholtz-Zentrum fur Umweltforschung-UFZ, Magdeburg, Germany
Corporate Author Thesis
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2397-334X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32015523 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2827
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Author Yue, F.; Xia, K.; Wei, L.; Xing, L.; Wu, S.; Shi, Y.; Man, L.S.; Shui, G.; Xiang, X.; Russell, R.; Zhang, D.
Title Constant light exposure causes dysregulation of sphingolipids and promotes steatohepatitis in high-fat fed rats Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2020 Publication Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Abbreviated Journal J Gastroenterol Hepatol
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals; apoptosis; ceramide; light pollution; non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; sphingolipids
Abstract BACKGROUND AND AIM: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a growing public health concern worldwide. With the progression of urbanization, light pollution is becoming an inevitable risk factor for NAFLD. However, the role of light pollution on NAFLD is insufficiently understood, and the underlying mechanism remains unclear. The present study explored effects of constant light exposure on NAFLD and elucidated its related mechanisms. METHODS: Thirty-two male SD rats were divided into 4 groups (n=8 each): 1) rats on a normal diet exposed to standard light-dark cycle (ND-LD); 2) rats on a normal diet exposed to constant light (ND-LL); 3) rats on a high fat diet exposed to standard light-dark cycle (HFD-LD); 4) and rats on a high fat diet exposed to constant light (HFD-LL). After 12 weeks treatment, rats were sacrificed and pathophysiological assessments were performed. Targeted lipidomics was used to measure sphingolipids, including ceramides, glucosylceramides and lactosylceramides, sphingomyelins and sphingosine-1-phosphates in plasma and liver tissues. RESULTS: In normal chow rats, constant light exposure led to glucose abnormalities and dyslipidemia. In high-fat fed rats, constant light exposure exacerbated glucose abnormalities, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, inflammation and aggravated steatohepatitis. Compared to HFD-LD rats, HFD-LL had decreased plasma sphingosine-1-phosphate and elevated liver concentrations of total ceramides and specific ceramide species (ceramide d18:0/24:0, ceramide d18:1/22:0, ceramide d18:1/24:0 and ceramide d18:1/24:1), and which were associated with increased hepatocyte apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS: Constant light exposure causes dysregulation of sphingolipids and promotes steatohepatitis in high-fat fed rats.
Address Department of Endocrinology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0815-9319 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32027419 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2829
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Author Kyba, C.C.M.; Giuliani, G.; Franziskakis, F.; Tockner, K.; Lacroix, P.
Title Artisanal and Small-Scale Mining Sites in the Democratic Republic of the Congo Are Not Associated with Nighttime Light Emissions Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2019 Publication J Abbreviated Journal J
Volume 2 Issue 2 Pages 152-161
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Maintaining records of artisanal and small-scale mining sites in developing countries requires considerable effort, so it would be beneficial if Earth observation data from space could assist in the identifying and monitoring of such sites. Artificial light emissions are common at industrial-scale mining sites and have been associated with small-scale illegal mining in some contexts. Here, we examine whether known artisanal and small-scale mining sites in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) are associated with observations of night light emissions by the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite Day/Night Band (DNB). Light emissions from the mining sites were not observed: the radiance observed from the sites was near zero and nearly identical to that observed for a set of randomly-chosen locations in the same region. While it is the case that DNB night lights’ products provide useful data in other resource extraction contexts, they do not appear to be useful for identifying artisanal mining sites in the DRC.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2571-8800 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2295
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Author Thompson, E.K.; Cullinan, N.L.; Jones, T.M.; Hopkins, G.R.
Title Effects of artificial light at night and male calling on movement patterns and mate location in field crickets Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2019 Publication Animal Behaviour Abbreviated Journal Animal Behaviour
Volume 158 Issue Pages 183-191
Keywords Animals
Abstract Anthropogenic factors, such as artificial light at night (ALAN), are increasingly linked to significant modifications in animal behaviours, such as foraging or migration. However, few studies have investigated directly whether the presence of ALAN affects the ability to find a mate (mate location). One direct effect of the presence of ALAN is that it can create a light barrier in an otherwise dark environment. This may have significant behavioural implications for nocturnally active species if it affects their ability to respond to potential mates. Our study, using the acoustically orienting Australian black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus, determined experimentally whether the presence of a fragmented light environment influenced movement patterns of virgin females and males. Moreover, given the importance of male song for reproductive outcomes in this species, we assessed simultaneously whether such behaviours were modified by the presence of a male attraction call. We found that while initiation of movement was slower in the presence of ALAN, the behavioural shifts associated with its presence were relatively small compared to the influence of a broadcast male attraction call. The response to the male attraction call was typically stronger for females than for males, but both males and females modified aspects of behaviour when it was present regardless of whether their immediate environment was fragmented by artificial light at night or not. Artificial light at night may alter subtle aspects of movement and mating behaviour in this species, but ultimately does not provide a barrier to movement or mate location.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0003-3472 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2752
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