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Author Cox, D.T.C.; Sánchez de Miguel, A.; Dzurjak, S.A.; Bennie, J.; Gaston, K.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title National Scale Spatial Variation in Artificial Light at Night Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2020 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing  
  Volume 12 Issue 10 Pages 1591  
  Keywords Skyglow; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract The disruption to natural light regimes caused by outdoor artificial nighttime lighting has significant impacts on human health and the natural world. Artificial light at night takes two forms, light emissions and skyglow (caused by the scattering of light by water, dust and gas molecules in the atmosphere). Key to determining where the biological impacts from each form are likely to be experienced is understanding their spatial occurrence, and how this varies with other landscape factors. To examine this, we used data from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) day/night band and the World Atlas of Artificial Night Sky Brightness, to determine covariation in (a) light emissions, and (b) skyglow, with human population density, landcover, protected areas and roads in Britain. We demonstrate that, although artificial light at night increases with human density, the amount of light per person decreases with increasing urbanization (with per capita median direct emissions three times greater in rural than urban populations, and per capita median skyglow eleven times greater). There was significant variation in artificial light at night within different landcover types, emphasizing that light pollution is not a solely urban issue. Further, half of English National Parks have higher levels of skyglow than light emissions, indicating their failure to buffer biodiversity from pressures that artificial lighting poses. The higher per capita emissions in rural than urban areas provide different challenges and opportunities for mitigating the negative human health and environmental impacts of light pollution.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
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  ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2926  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yao, J.Q.; Zhai, H.R.; Tang, X.M.; Gao, X.M.; Yang, X.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Amazon Fire Monitoring and Analysis Based on Multi-source Remote Sensing Data Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2020 Publication IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science Abbreviated Journal IOP Conf. Ser.: Earth Environ. Sci.  
  Volume 474 Issue Pages 042025  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract In August 2019, a large-scale fire broke out in the Amazon rainforest, bringing serious harm to the ecosystem and human beings. In order to accurately monitor the dynamic change of forest fire in Amazon rainforest and analyse the impact of fire spreading and extinction on the environment, firstly, based on NPP VIIRS data covering the Amazon fire area, the sliding window threshold method is adopted to extract the fire point, and the cause of fire change is monitored and analysed according to the time series. Secondly, based on the time series of CALIPSO data, the vertical distribution changes of atmospheric pollutants in the amazon fire area are analysed, and the comprehensive analysis is carried out by combining NPP VIIRS data. The experimental results show that only NPP VIIRS data is used to predict the fire, and the combination of CALIPSO data can better monitor the forest fire and predict the fire development trend. The combination of optical image and laser radar has greater advantages in dynamic fire monitoring and fire impact analysis. The method described in this paper can provide basic data reference for real-time and accurate prediction of forest fires and provide new ideas for dynamic fire monitoring.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1755-1315 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2927  
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Author Kyba, C.C.M.; Giuliani, G.; Franziskakis, F.; Tockner, K.; Lacroix, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artisanal and Small-Scale Mining Sites in the Democratic Republic of the Congo Are Not Associated with Nighttime Light Emissions Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2019 Publication J Abbreviated Journal J  
  Volume 2 Issue 2 Pages 152-161  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Maintaining records of artisanal and small-scale mining sites in developing countries requires considerable effort, so it would be beneficial if Earth observation data from space could assist in the identifying and monitoring of such sites. Artificial light emissions are common at industrial-scale mining sites and have been associated with small-scale illegal mining in some contexts. Here, we examine whether known artisanal and small-scale mining sites in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) are associated with observations of night light emissions by the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite Day/Night Band (DNB). Light emissions from the mining sites were not observed: the radiance observed from the sites was near zero and nearly identical to that observed for a set of randomly-chosen locations in the same region. While it is the case that DNB night lights’ products provide useful data in other resource extraction contexts, they do not appear to be useful for identifying artisanal mining sites in the DRC.  
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  ISSN 2571-8800 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2295  
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Author Thompson, E.K.; Cullinan, N.L.; Jones, T.M.; Hopkins, G.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of artificial light at night and male calling on movement patterns and mate location in field crickets Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2019 Publication Animal Behaviour Abbreviated Journal Animal Behaviour  
  Volume 158 Issue Pages 183-191  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Anthropogenic factors, such as artificial light at night (ALAN), are increasingly linked to significant modifications in animal behaviours, such as foraging or migration. However, few studies have investigated directly whether the presence of ALAN affects the ability to find a mate (mate location). One direct effect of the presence of ALAN is that it can create a light barrier in an otherwise dark environment. This may have significant behavioural implications for nocturnally active species if it affects their ability to respond to potential mates. Our study, using the acoustically orienting Australian black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus, determined experimentally whether the presence of a fragmented light environment influenced movement patterns of virgin females and males. Moreover, given the importance of male song for reproductive outcomes in this species, we assessed simultaneously whether such behaviours were modified by the presence of a male attraction call. We found that while initiation of movement was slower in the presence of ALAN, the behavioural shifts associated with its presence were relatively small compared to the influence of a broadcast male attraction call. The response to the male attraction call was typically stronger for females than for males, but both males and females modified aspects of behaviour when it was present regardless of whether their immediate environment was fragmented by artificial light at night or not. Artificial light at night may alter subtle aspects of movement and mating behaviour in this species, but ultimately does not provide a barrier to movement or mate location.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0003-3472 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2752  
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Author Alzahrani, H.S.; Khuu, S.K.; Roy, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Modelling the effect of commercially available blue-blocking lenses on visual and non-visual functions Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2019 Publication Clinical & Experimental Optometry Abbreviated Journal Clin Exp Optom  
  Volume in press Issue Pages cxo.12959  
  Keywords Human Health; blue-blocking lenses; non-visual functions; transmittance; visual functions  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Blue-blocking lenses (BBLs) are marketed as providing retinal protection from acute and cumulative exposure to blue light over time. The selective reduction in visible wavelengths transmitted through BBLs is known to influence the photosensitivity of retinal photoreceptors, which affects both visual and non-visual functions. This study measured the spectral transmittance of BBLs and evaluated their effect on blue perception, scotopic vision, circadian rhythm, and protection from photochemical retinal damage. METHODS: Seven different types of BBLs from six manufacturers and untinted control lenses with three different powers (+2.00 D, -2.00 D and Plano) were evaluated. The whiteness index of BBLs used in this study was calculated using Commission International de l'Eclairage (CIE) Standard Illuminates D65, and CIE 1964 Standard with a 2 degrees Observer. The protective qualities of BBLs and their effect on blue perception, scotopic vision, and circadian rhythm were evaluated based on their spectral transmittance, which was measured with a Cary 5,000 UV-Vis-NIR spectrophotometer. RESULTS: BBLs were found to reduce blue light (400-500 nm) by 6-43 per cent, providing significant protection from photochemical retinal damage compared to control lenses (p </= 0.05). All BBLs were capable of reducing the perception of blue colours, scotopic sensitivities and circadian sensitivities by 5-36 per cent, 5-24 per cent, and 4-27 per cent, respectively depending on the brand and power of the lens. CONCLUSION: BBLs can provide some protection to the human eye from photochemical retinal damage by reducing a portion of blue light that may affect visual and non-visual performances, such as those critical to scotopic vision, blue perception, and circadian rhythm.  
  Address School of Optometry and Vision Science, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0816-4622 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31441122 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2654  
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