toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Wang, C.; Chen, Z.; Yang, C.; Li, Q.; Wu, Q.; Wu, J.; Zhang, G.; Yu, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Analyzing parcel-level relationships between Luojia 1-01 nighttime light intensity and artificial surface features across Shanghai, China: A comparison with NPP-VIIRS data Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2020 Publication International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation Abbreviated Journal International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation  
  Volume 85 Issue Pages 101989  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Nighttime light (NTL) remote sensing data have been widely used to derive socioeconomic indices at national and regional scales. However, few studies analyzed the factors that may explain NTL variations at a fine scale due to the limited resolution of existing NTL data. As a new generation NTL satellite, Luojia 1-01 provides NTL data with a finer spatial resolution of ∼130 m and can be used to assess the relationship between NTL intensity and artificial surface features on an unprecedented scale. This study represents the first efforts to assess the relationship between Luojia 1-01 NTL intensity and artificial surface features at the parcel level in comparison to the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership-Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (NPP-VIIRS) NTL data. Points-of-interest (POIs) and land-use/land-cover (LULC) data were used in random forest (RF) regression models for both Luojia 1-01 and NPP-VIIRS to analyze the feature contribution of artificial surface features to NTL intensity. The results show that luminosity variations in Luojia 1-01 data for different land-use types were more significant than those in NPP-VIIRS data because of the finer spatial resolution and wider measurement range. Seventeen variables extracted from POI and LULC data explained the Luojia 1-01 and NPP-VIIRS NTL intensity, with a good out-of-bag score of 0.62 and 0.76, respectively. Moreover, Luojia 1-01 data had fewer “blooming” phenomena than NPP-VIIRS data, especially for cropland, water body, and rural area. Luojia 1-01 is more suitable for estimating socioeconomic activities and can attain more comprehensive information on human activities, since the feature contribution of POI variables is more sensitive to NTL intensity in the Luojia 1-01 RF regression model than that in the NPP-VIIRS RF regression model.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0303-2434 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2745  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gong, P.; Li, X.; Wang, J.; Bai, Y.; Chen, B.; Hu, T.; Liu, X.; Xu, B.; Yang, J.; Zhang, W.; Zhou, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Annual maps of global artificial impervious area (GAIA) between 1985 and 2018 Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2020 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment  
  Volume 236 Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Artificial impervious areas are predominant indicators of human settlements. Timely, accurate, and frequent information on artificial impervious areas is critical to understanding the process of urbanization and land use/cover change, as well as of their impacts on the environment and biodiversity. Despite their importance, there still lack annual maps of high-resolution Global Artificial Impervious Areas (GAIA) with longer than 30-year records, due to the high demand of high performance computation and the lack of effective mapping algorithms. In this paper, we mapped annual GAIA from 1985 to 2018 using the full archive of 30-m resolution Landsat images on the Google Earth Engine platform. With ancillary datasets, including the nighttime light data and the Sentinel-1 Synthetic Aperture Radar data, we improved the performance of our previously developed algorithm in arid areas. We evaluated the GAIA data for 1985, 1990, 1995, 2000, 2005, 2010, and 2015, and the mean overall accuracy is higher than 90%. A cross-product comparison indicates the GAIA data are the only dataset spanning over 30 years. The temporal trend in GAIA agrees well with other datasets at the local, regional, and global scales. Our results indicate that the GAIA reached 797,076 km2 in 2018, which is 1.5 times more than that in 1990. China and the United States (US) rank among the top two in artificial impervious area, accounting for approximately 50% of the world's total in 2018. The artificial impervious area of China surpassed that of the US in 2015. By 2018, the remaining eight among the top ten countries are India, Russia, Brazil, France, Italy, Germany, Japan, and Canada. The GAIA dataset can be freely downloaded from http://data.ess.tsinghua.edu.cn.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2756  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lao, S.; Robertson, B.A.; Anderson, A.W.; Blair, R.B.; Eckles, J.W.; Turner, R.J.; Loss, S.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The influence of artificial night at night and polarized light on bird-building collisions Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2020 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biological Conservation  
  Volume 241 Issue Pages 108358  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Collisions with buildings annually kill up to 1 billion birds in the United States. Bird-building collisions primarily occur at glass surfaces: birds often fail to perceive glass as a barrier and appear to be attracted to artificial light emitted from windows. However, some aspects of avian vision are poorly understood, including how bird responses to different types of light influence building collisions. Some evidence suggests birds can detect polarized light, which may serve as a cue to assist with migration orientation and/or detect water bodies. Dark, reflective surfaces, including glass, reflect high degrees of polarized light, causing polarized light pollution (PLP). However, no studies have analyzed the relationship between bird collisions and PLP reflected from buildings. Additionally, while artificial light at night (ALAN) is frequently implicated as a major factor influencing bird-building collisions, few studies have analyzed this relationship. We investigated both types of light pollution—PLP and ALAN—and their association with bird collisions at 48 façades of 13 buildings in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. We found that the area of glass emitting ALAN was the most important factor influencing collisions, and that this effect of ALAN was independent of overall glass area; this result provides strong support for turning off lights at night to reduce bird-building collisions. Although we found no relationship between PLP and collisions, additional research is needed to better understand bird responses to polarized light. Fully understanding how different aspects of light influence bird-building collisions can inform conservation efforts to reduce this major threat to birds.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2757  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hu, X.; Qian, Y.; Pickett, S.T.A.; Zhou, W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Urban mapping needs up-to-date approaches to provide diverse perspectives of current urbanization: A novel attempt to map urban areas with nighttime light data Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2020 Publication Landscape and Urban Planning Abbreviated Journal Landscape and Urban Planning  
  Volume 195 Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Quantifying the spatial and temporal changes of urban extent is important for understanding the burgeoning process of urbanization. Numerous well-performing methods have been used to map urban areas and detect urban changes using nighttime light data, but many of these methods assume that the urban area is equivalent to regions with high percentages of impervious surfaces or developed land. We present an approach to efficiently map urban areas at the regional scale, which also provides opportunities to recognize urban extents from different theoretical perspectives. In our approach, appropriate demarcating criteria and urban indicators were chosen based on understanding the current state of urbanization of the study area. After object-based segmentation and detection of initial urban centers, urban patches are discerned by expanding from these initial urban centers through a grouping algorithm, delineating the relative fringes of the urban area. We tested this new approach for mainland China, using 2010 Defense Meteorological Satellite Program/Operational Linescan System nighttime light data and county-level administrative units. We found a total urban area of 146,806  spread across 2489 counties and amounting to 1.5% of the land in mainland China. The delineated boundary of the urban patches had different values by compass direction. Mean values of fringes and sizes of different urban patches varied greatly across regions. We detected all provincial capitals, 97.3% of the prefecture-level cities and 91.0% of the county-level cities. This approach is thus capable of identifying urban patches with reliable accuracy at the regional scale.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0169-2046 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2763  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Levin, N.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Zhang, Q.; Sánchez de Miguel, A.; Román, M.O.; Li, X.; Portnov, B.A.; Molthan, A.L.; Jechow, A.; Miller, S.D.; Wang, Z.; Shrestha, R.M.; Elvidge, C.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Remote sensing of night lights: A review and an outlook for the future Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2020 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment  
  Volume 237 Issue Pages 111443  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Remote sensing of night light emissions in the visible band offers a unique opportunity to directly observe human activity from space. This has allowed a host of applications including mapping urban areas, estimating population and GDP, monitoring disasters and conflicts. More recently, remotely sensed night lights data have found use in understanding the environmental impacts of light emissions (light pollution), including their impacts on human health. In this review, we outline the historical development of night-time optical sensors up to the current state of the art sensors, highlight various applications of night light data, discuss the special challenges associated with remote sensing of night lights with a focus on the limitations of current sensors, and provide an outlook for the future of remote sensing of night lights. While the paper mainly focuses on space borne remote sensing, ground based sensing of night-time brightness for studies on astronomical and ecological light pollution, as well as for calibration and validation of space borne data, are also discussed. Although the development of night light sensors lags behind day-time sensors, we demonstrate that the field is in a stage of rapid development. The worldwide transition to LED lights poses a particular challenge for remote sensing of night lights, and strongly highlights the need for a new generation of space borne night lights instruments. This work shows that future sensors are needed to monitor temporal changes during the night (for example from a geostationary platform or constellation of satellites), and to better understand the angular patterns of light emission (roughly analogous to the BRDF in daylight sensing). Perhaps most importantly, we make the case that higher spatial resolution and multispectral sensors covering the range from blue to NIR are needed to more effectively identify lighting technologies, map urban functions, and monitor energy use.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2771  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: