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Author Pásková, M.; Budinská, N.; Zelenka, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Astrotourism–Exceeding Limits of the Earth and Tourism Definitions? Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2021 Publication Sustainability Abbreviated Journal Sustainability  
  Volume 13 Issue 1 Pages 373  
  Keywords Astrotourism  
  Abstract Emerging forms of alternative or even niche tourism represent a dynamic trend in tourism development. Astrotourism is completely off the beaten path. The aim of this study is to provide a deeper insight into this phenomenon. It strives to reveal motivations, experiences, and perceptions of its participants. It also aspires to propose its complex definition as an activity including both terrestrial astrotourism and space tourism. It is suggested to perceive it not only as a form of alternative and/or niche tourism, but also that of mass and professional tourism. To reach these objectives, the authors analyzed relevant published studies and astrotourism products presented on relevant websites and social media. They elaborated the collected secondary data by mental mapping and the comparative analysis of terrestrial and space tourism products. Moreover, the authors collected primary data through a survey with open-ended questions addressed to persons interested in astrotourism and through semi-structured interviews with terrestrial astrotourism participants and personalities. The results provide insight into both the specifity and variability of astrotourism and their typical products, as well as a discussion of their future trends. They also bring a motivation spectrum for the astrotourism participants and benefits perceived by them.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2071-1050 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3237  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lynn, K.D.; Tummon Flynn, P.; Manriquez, K.; Manriquez, P.H.; Pulgar, J.; Duarte, C.; Quijon, P.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial light at night alters the settlement of acorn barnacles on a man-made habitat in Atlantic Canada Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2021 Publication Marine Pollution Bulletin Abbreviated Journal Mar Pollut Bull  
  Volume 163 Issue Pages 111928  
  Keywords Animals; ALAN plates; Atlantic Canada; Semibalanus balanoides; Settlement  
  Abstract Human growth has caused an unprecedented increase in artificial light at night (ALAN). In coastal habitats, many species rely on day/night cycles to regulate various aspects of their life history and these cycles can be altered by this stressor. This study assessed the influence of ALAN on the early (cyprid) and late (spat) settlement stages of the acorn barnacle Semibalanus balanoides, a species widely distributed in natural and man-made coastal habitats of the North Atlantic. A newly designed settlement plate, originally for studies in rocky intertidal habitats in the southeast Pacific, was adapted to measure settlement rates on man-made habitats -wharf seawalls- located in Atlantic Canada. Plates equipped with a small LED diode powered by an internal battery (ALAN plates) were used to quantify settlement rates in comparison to plates lacking a light source (controls). These plates were deployed for 6 d in the mid-intertidal levels, where adult barnacles were readily visible. ALAN and control plates collected large number of settlers and showed to be suitable for this type of man-made habitats. The number of early settlers (cyprids) did not differ between plates but the number of late settlers (spat) was significantly lower in ALAN plates than in controls. These results suggest that light pollution has little influence on the early stages of the acorn barnacle settlement but is clearly detrimental to its late stages. As barnacles dominate in many natural and man-made hard substrates, it is likely that ALAN also has indirect effects on community structure.  
  Address Department of Biology, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, Canada. Electronic address: pquijon@upei.ca  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0025-326X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:33418341 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3238  
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Author van Hasselt, S.J.; Hut, R.A.; Allocca, G.; Vyssotski, A.L.; Piersma, T.; Rattenborg, N.C.; Meerlo, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Cloud cover amplifies the sleep-suppressing effect of artificial light at night in geese Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2021 Publication Environmental Pollution Abbreviated Journal Environmental Pollution  
  Volume in press Issue Pages 116444  
  Keywords Animals; Skyglow  
  Abstract In modern society the night sky is lit up not only by the moon but also by artificial light devices. Both of these light sources can have a major impact on wildlife physiology and behaviour. For example, a number of bird species were found to sleep several hours less under full moon compared to new moon and a similar sleep-suppressing effect has been reported for artificial light at night (ALAN). Cloud cover at night can modulate the light levels perceived by wildlife, yet, in opposite directions for ALAN and moon. While clouds will block moon light, it may reflect and amplify ALAN levels and increases the night glow in urbanized areas. As a consequence, cloud cover may also modulate the sleep-suppressing effects of moon and ALAN in different directions. In this study we therefore measured sleep in barnacle geese (Branta leucopsis) under semi-natural conditions in relation to moon phase, ALAN and cloud cover. Our analysis shows that, during new moon nights stronger cloud cover was indeed associated with increased ALAN levels at our study site. In contrast, light levels during full moon nights were fairly constant, presumably because of moonlight on clear nights or because of reflected artificial light on cloudy nights. Importantly, cloud cover caused an estimated 24.8% reduction in the amount of night-time NREM sleep from nights with medium to full cloud cover, particularly during new moon when sleep was unaffected by moon light. In conclusion, our findings suggest that cloud cover can, in a rather dramatic way, amplify the immediate effects of ALAN on wildlife. Sleep appears to be highly sensitive to ALAN and may therefore be a good indicator of its biological effects.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3239  
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Author Li, F.; Li, E.; Zhang, C.; Samat, A.; Liu, W.; Li, C.; Atkinson, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Estimating Artificial Impervious Surface Percentage in Asia by Fusing Multi-Temporal MODIS and VIIRS Nighttime Light Data Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2021 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing  
  Volume 13 Issue 2 Pages 212  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Impervious surfaces have important effects on the natural environment, including promoting hydrological run-off and impeding evapotranspiration, as well as increasing the urban heat island effect. Obtaining accurate and timely information on the spatial distribution and dynamics of urban surfaces is, thus, of paramount importance for socio-economic analysis, urban planning, and environmental modeling and management. Previous studies have indicated that the fusion of multi-source remotely sensed imagery can increase the accuracy of prediction for impervious surface information across large areas. However, the majority of them are limited to the use of specific data sources to construct a few features with which it can be challenging to characterize adequately the variation in impervious surfaces over large areas. Thus, impervious surface maps are often presented with high uncertainty. In response to this problem, we proposed the use of multi-temporal MODIS and Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) nighttime light data to construct a more general and robust feature set for large-area artificial impervious surface percentage (AISP) prediction. Three fusion methods were proposed for application to multi-temporal MODIS surface reflectance product (MOD09A1) and Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (NPP-VIIRS) Day/Night Band (DNB) data to construct three different types of features: spectral features, index features (band calculations), and fusion features. These features were then used as variables in a random-forest-based AISP prediction model. The model was fitted to China and then applied to predict AISP across Asia. Fifteen typical cities from different regions of Asia were selected to assess the accuracy of the prediction model. The use of multi-temporal MODIS and VIIRS DNB data was found to significantly increase the accuracy of prediction for large-area AISP. The feature set constructed in this research was demonstrated to be suitable for large-area AISP prediction, and the random forest model based on optimization of the selected features achieved the highest accuracy, amongst benchmarks, with testing R2 of 0.690, and testing RMSE of 0.044 in 2018, respectively. In addition, to further test the performance of the proposed method, three existing impervious products (GAIA, HBASE, and NUACI) were used to compare quantitatively. The results showed that the predicted AISP achieved superior performance in comparison with others in some areas (e.g., arid areas and cloudy areas).  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3241  
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Author Wilson, R.; Wakefield, A.; Roberts, N.; Jones, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial light and biting flies: the parallel development of attractive light traps and unattractive domestic lights Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2021 Publication Parasites & Vectors Abbreviated Journal Parasit Vectors  
  Volume 14 Issue 1 Pages 28  
  Keywords Animals; Human Health; Diptera; Light attraction; Phototaxis; Spectral wavelength preferences; Vector  
  Abstract Light trapping is an important tool for monitoring insect populations. This is especially true for biting Diptera, where light traps play a crucial role in disease surveillance by tracking the presence and abundance of vector species. Physiological and behavioural data have been instrumental in identifying factors that influence dipteran phototaxis and have spurred the development of more effective light traps. However, the development of less attractive domestic lights has received comparatively little interest but could be important for reducing interactions between humans and vector insects, with consequences for reducing disease transmission. Here, we discuss how dipteran eyes respond to light and the factors influencing positive phototaxis, and conclude by identifying key areas for further research. In addition, we include a synthesis of attractive and unattractive wavelengths for a number of vector species. A more comprehensive understanding of how Diptera perceive and respond to light would allow for more efficient vector sampling as well as potentially limiting the risk posed by domestic lighting.  
  Address School of Biological Sciences, University of Bristol, Life Sciences Building, 24 Tyndall Avenue, Bristol, BS8 1TQ, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1756-3305 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:33413591; PMCID:PMC7789162 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3242  
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