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Author Lewis, A.L.
Title Visual Performance as a Function of Spectral Power Distribution of Light Sources at Luminances Used for General Outdoor Lighting Type Journal Article
Year (up) 1999 Publication Journal of the Illuminating Engineering Society Abbreviated Journal Journal of the Illuminating Engineering Society
Volume 28 Issue 1 Pages 37-42
Keywords Vision; spectral power distribution; SPD; lighting
Abstract (none)
Address Michigan College of Optometry, Ferris State University, Big Rapids, Michigan
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Taylor & Francis Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0099-4480 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2223
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Author Quinn, G.E.; Shin, C.H.; Maguire, M.G.; Stone, R.A.
Title Myopia and ambient lighting at night Type Journal Article
Year (up) 1999 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature
Volume 399 Issue 6732 Pages 113-114
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Myopia, or short-sightedness, occurs when the image of distant objects, focused by the cornea and lens, falls in front of the retina. It commonly arises from excessive postnatal eye growth, particularly in the vitreous cavity. Its prevalence is increasing and now reaches 70-90% in some Asian populations1,2. As well as requiring optical correction, myopia is a leading risk factor for acquired blindness in adults because it predisposes individuals to retinal detachment, retinal degeneration and glaucoma. It typically develops in the early school years but can manifest into early adulthood2. Its aetiology is poorly understood but may involve genetic and environmental factors1,2, such as viewing close objects, although how this stimulates eye growth is not known3. We have looked at the effects of light exposure on vision, and find a strong association between myopia and night-time ambient light exposure during sleep in children before they reach two years of age.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:10335839 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2550
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Author Teare, S. W.
Title The night sky brightness at Mount Wilson Observatory Type Journal Article
Year (up) 2000 Publication The Observatory Abbreviated Journal
Volume 120 Issue Pages 313-317
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2001
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Author Flannagan, M.J.; Sivak, M.; Traube, E.C.; Kojima, S.
Title Effects of Overall Low-Beam Intensity on Seeing Distance in the Presence of Glare Type Journal Article
Year (up) 2000 Publication Transportation Human Factors Abbreviated Journal Transportation Human Factors
Volume 2 Issue 4 Pages 313-330
Keywords Public Safety; Vision
Abstract Previous studies have demonstrated that current low-beam headlamps do not provide adequate seeing distance for safety. Could this situation be improved by providing more total light from low-beam headlamps, leaving the relative distribution of light unchanged? Although such a proposal is probably not the best practical solution, it is important to consider some of the visual consequences of a general increase in light to analyze the overall problem of low-beam headlighting.

In a nighttime field study we measured seeing distance in the presence of glare as a function of headlamp intensity, always varying the intensity of the seeing light and glare light by the same proportion. Increasing intensity by a factor of about 3.8 increased seeing distance by about 17% for both young and old drivers. This result is consistent with predictions from quantitative vision modeling using veiling luminance to represent the disabling effects of glare. We also collected subjective estimates of discomfort glare and found, as expected, that the higher intensities produced substantially more discomfort.

Our findings suggest that, if objective visual performance is the only criterion, there is no clear upper limit to how intense low-beam headlamps should be. However, there may be a level at which people simply will not tolerate the subjectively discomforting effects of glare, or at which glare indirectly affects objective performance through its effects on subjective comfort. Because subjective discomfort, rather than objective visual performance, may be the limiting consideration for setting maximum glare levels, more research should be done to understand the nature and consequences of discomfort glare, including possible effects of subjective comfort on objective visual behavior.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1093-9741 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2127
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Author Garstang, R.H.
Title Light Pollution at Mount Wilson: The Effects of Population Growth and Air Pollution Type Journal Article
Year (up) 2000 Publication Memorie della Società Astronomia Italiana Abbreviated Journal
Volume 71 Issue 1 Pages
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract This is the first part of a study of the historical growth of light pollution at Mount Wilson Observatory. The night sky brightness at Mount Wilson due to light pollution from Los Angeles basin was calculated for the years 1910 to 1990, neglecting changes in lighting technology, and without any air pollution ('smog'). The very large effect of population growth is shown. We made a simple extension of our night sky brightness program to include a layer of smog. Two possibilities of constant density and finite thickness. The ground level density is determined by the visibility. We assume a smog layer whose density increases from zero in 1920 to appropriate values for the years from 1950. We added this layer to out model and repeated the Mount Wilson calculations. An average smog layer reduces the visual brightness at the present time by about 6 percent.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2544
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