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Author Wickham, D.A.
Title Attracting and Controlling Coastal Pelagic Fish with Nightlights Type Journal Article
Year (up) 1973 Publication Transactions of the American Fisheries Society Abbreviated Journal Transactions of the American Fisheries Society
Volume 102 Issue 4 Pages 816-825
Keywords Animals
Abstract Field experiments were conducted in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico to evaluate techniques for using sequentially‐operated lamp strings and moving lamps to lead and concentrate light‐attracted coastal pelagic fishes. Fish were successfully led between sequentially‐operated under‐water lamps separated by distances up to 20 meters. Mobile lamps were used to lead fish distances up to approximately 1 kilometer. Fish aggregations which form daily around man‐made structures were held after dark and led clear with moving lamps for capture by purse seine. A combination of nightlighting and man‐made structure fish attraction techniques are proposed for harvesting coastal pelagic fish aggregations which occur around existing petroleton drilling platforms, well heads, and other areas presently inaccessible to conventional fishing gear.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0002-8487 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2452
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Author Croft, T.A.
Title Burning Waste Gas in Oil Fields Type Journal Article
Year (up) 1973 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature
Volume 245 Issue 5425 Pages 375-376
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract I WAS recently amazed by some night-time spacecraft photographs, exemplified by Fig. 1, that present graphic evidence of waste and pollution. These were obtained by the United States Air Force DAPP system which has sensors in the visible 0.4 to 1.1 µm band and an infrared imaging system in the 8 to 13 µm band (ref. 1 and J. L. McLucas, personal communication). The visible band sensor is Capable of responding to very dim light with a controllable threshold (T. O. Haig, personal communication) and it provided these pictures. The lights of cities are clearly visible, as are the aurora, surface features illuminated by moonlight, and fires such as those caused by burning gas from oil fields and refineries. Much power is evidently being generated to light the cities of the world since at the inhabited areas are clearly outlined. It is also apparent that, in the process of extracting liquid petroleum from beneath the surface of the Earth, abundant gas supply has been discovered but is not used. Being unable to contain the gas or to transport it to a user, it is simply burnt.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2365
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Author Treanor, P. J.
Title A simple propagation law for artificial night-sky illumination Type Journal Article
Year (up) 1973 Publication The Observatory Abbreviated Journal
Volume 93 Issue Pages 117-120
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract The problem of locating new large astronomical observatories in sites which have a suitably dark night sky (artificial excess of the order of omi) is becoming increasingly difficult in Europe and the United States, on account of extensive urban development, the high luminous efficiency of modern discharge lighting, and the scattering of light in an atmosphere contaminated by aerosols. To investigate the artificial illumination of the sky over large regions on the basis of necessarily limited observations, one needs an expression for the zenith brightness produced by towns of known site and distance.

The exact derivation of such a law is exceedingly complex, involving the computation of the radiation transfer in an atmosphere with absorption, multiple scattering, and complicated physical and geometrical parameters. Notwithstanding these difficulties, it is possible to obtain a useful physical insight into the general form of this law by considering a very simplified model, consisting of a homogeneous atmosphere, in which vertical heights are small in relation to the horizontal distances between town and observatory, and which the scattering is limited to a cone of small angle whose axis lies in the direction of the incident beam. The limited scale height and optical thickness of the real atmosphere, and the forward-scattering characteristics of aerosols lend some plausibility to these simplifications.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2633
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Author Roach, F.E.; Gordon, J.L.
Title The Light of the Night Sky Type Book Whole
Year (up) 1973 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Natural Sky Brightness; Airglow
Abstract Astronomy appears to us as a combination of art, science, and philosophy. Its study puts the universe into perspective, giving a sense of pleasure in its beauty, awe at its immensity, and humility at our trivial place in it. From earliest human history, man has scrutinized the night sky – and wondered and marveled. With unaided eye but perceptive mind, he recognized order in the regular appearance and movements of individual objects, such as the planets and star groups (constellations), in their rhythmic and majestic progressions across the bowl of night. Even in the present era of scientific exactitude, there remains a profound awareness of mysteries beyond our present interpretations. It is only in comparatively recent years, however, that man has recognized that it takes more than conventional astronomy to account for the beauties ofthe night sky. Radiations in the Earth's upper atmosphere provide a foreground light, the study of which has come under a new name, aeronomy. The science of aeronomy has rapidly burgeoned, and the student of the light of the night sky finds that he is involved in an interdisciplinary domain. The 'meat' of one discipline, however, may be the 'poison' of the other. To the astronomer, the Earth's atmosphere, inhibiting his extra-terrestrial viewing, is a serious nuisance. To the aeronomer, the Moon, planets, stars, and Galaxies hamper his measurements and interfere with his studies of the Earth's upper atmosphere. Yet both sets of elements are basic to the beauties as well as to the understanding of the light of the night sky. It is essentially the students of astronomy and aeronomy for whom we have written this book. We also hope, however, that it will present much of interest and value to the bemused sky watcher, for whom some detailed knowledge of the several con-tried to meld these dual objectives to create a broadly based, professionally valid tributors to the nighttinie sky may increase his pleasure in contemplating it. We have treatise that will lead the serious student to deeper probing into the phenomena and will inspire both him and the enthusiastic amateur to an appreciation of that half of their experience which we may refer to as their 'night life'.
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Publisher Reidel Publishing Company Place of Publication Dordrecht, Holland Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3125
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Author Dickinson, L.G.; Boselly, S.E.; Burgmann, W.S.
Title Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) – User's Guide Type Report
Year (up) 1974 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume ADA007678 Issue Pages
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract The capabilities of the spacecraft, sensors, and data processor for the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program are described. Many meteorological and geophysical uses of these data are examined, and examples used to illustrate the capabilities of the system to tailor the imagery for a large variety of present and future users.
Address AIR WEATHER SERVICE SCOTT AFB IL
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2387
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