toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Behar-Cohen, F.; Martinsons, C.; Vienot, F.; Zissis, G.; Barlier-Salsi, A.; Cesarini, J.P.; Enouf, O.; Garcia, M.; Picaud, S.; Attia, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light-emitting diodes (LED) for domestic lighting: any risks for the eye? Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Progress in Retinal and eye Research Abbreviated Journal Prog Retin Eye Res  
  Volume 30 Issue 4 Pages 239-257  
  Keywords Animals; Biomass; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Environmental Exposure; Eye Diseases/*etiology/pathology/physiopathology; Humans; *Light/adverse effects; Lighting/*methods; Reflex, Pupillary/physiology; Retina/pathology; Risk Assessment; *Semiconductors; Time Factors  
  Abstract Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are taking an increasing place in the market of domestic lighting because they produce light with low energy consumption. In the EU, by 2016, no traditional incandescent light sources will be available and LEDs may become the major domestic light sources. Due to specific spectral and energetic characteristics of white LEDs as compared to other domestic light sources, some concerns have been raised regarding their safety for human health and particularly potential harmful risks for the eye. To conduct a health risk assessment on systems using LEDs, the French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health & Safety (ANSES), a public body reporting to the French Ministers for ecology, for health and for employment, has organized a task group. This group consisted physicists, lighting and metrology specialists, retinal biologist and ophthalmologist who have worked together for a year. Part of this work has comprised the evaluation of group risks of different white LEDs commercialized on the French market, according to the standards and found that some of these lights belonged to the group risk 1 or 2. This paper gives a comprehensive analysis of the potential risks of white LEDs, taking into account pre-clinical knowledge as well as epidemiologic studies and reports the French Agency's recommendations to avoid potential retinal hazards.  
  Address Inserm UMRS 872, Physiopathology of Ocular Diseases: Therapeutic Innovations, Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, Paris, France. Francine.behar-cohen@crc.jussieur.fr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1350-9462 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21600300 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 240  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kloog, I.; Stevens, R.G.; Haim, A.; Portnov, B.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Nighttime light level co-distributes with breast cancer incidence worldwide Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Cancer Causes & Control : CCC Abbreviated Journal Cancer Causes Control  
  Volume 21 Issue 12 Pages 2059-2068  
  Keywords Adult; Birth Rate; Breast Neoplasms/*epidemiology/etiology; Carcinoma/*epidemiology/etiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Cohort Studies; Electricity; Female; Humans; Incidence; *Light/adverse effects; Lighting; Photoperiod; Registries; Urban Population/statistics & numerical data; World Health; oncogenesis  
  Abstract Breast cancer incidence varies widely among countries of the world for largely unknown reasons. We investigated whether country-level light at night (LAN) is associated with incidence. We compared incidence rates of five common cancers in women (breast, lung, colorectal, larynx, and liver), observed in 164 countries of the world from the GLOBOCAN database, with population-weighted country-level LAN, and with several developmental and environmental indicators, including fertility rate, per capita income, percent of urban population, and electricity consumption. Two types of regression models were used in the analysis: Ordinary Least Squares and Spatial Errors. We found a significant positive association between population LAN level and incidence rates of breast cancer. There was no such an association between LAN level and colorectal, larynx, liver, and lung cancers. A sensitivity test, holding other variables at their average values, yielded a 30-50% higher risk of breast cancer in the highest LAN exposed countries compared to the lowest LAN exposed countries. The possibility that under-reporting from the registries in the low-resource, and also low-LAN, countries created a spurious association was evaluated in several ways and shown not to account for the results. These findings provide coherence of the previously reported case-control and cohort studies with the co-distribution of LAN and breast cancer in entire populations.  
  Address Department of Natural Resources & Environmental Management, University of Haifa, 31905 Mount Carmel, Haifa, Israel  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0957-5243 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:20680434 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 160  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Li, Q.; Zheng, T.; Holford, T.R.; Boyle, P.; Zhang, Y.; Dai, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light at night and breast cancer risk: results from a population-based case-control study in Connecticut, USA Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Cancer Causes & Control : CCC Abbreviated Journal Cancer Causes Control  
  Volume 21 Issue 12 Pages 2281-2285  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology/*etiology; Carcinoma/epidemiology/*etiology; Case-Control Studies; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Connecticut/epidemiology; Female; Humans; *Light/adverse effects; Middle Aged; Population; Questionnaires; Risk Factors; United States/epidemiology; Work Schedule Tolerance/physiology; Oncogenesis  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To investigate the potential association between domestic exposure to light at night (LAN) and the risk of human breast cancer. METHODS: A case-control study of female breast cancer was conducted in Connecticut. A total of 363 incident breast cancer cases and 356 age frequency-matched controls were interviewed using a standardized, structured questionnaire to obtain information on sleeping patterns and bedroom light environment. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by unconditional multivariate logistic regression. RESULTS: A non-significantly increased risk of breast cancer was observed among postmenopausal women for those keeping lights on while sleeping (OR = 1.4, 95% CI 0.7, 2.7), those who reported mainly sleeping in the daytime (OR = 1.4, 95% CI 0.5, 4.3), and those not drawing the curtains/window shades while sleeping at night (OR = 1.2, 95% CI 0.8, 1.9). CONCLUSION: The results from this study suggest a potential increased risk of breast cancer associated with domestic exposure to LAN. Further studies with larger sample size are needed to confirm the results.  
  Address Department of Social Medicine, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0957-5243 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:20927578; PMCID:PMC3154700 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 161  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: