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Author Stevens, R.G.; Blask, D.E.; Brainard, G.C.; Hansen, J.; Lockley, S.W.; Provencio, I.; Rea, M.S.; Reinlib, L.
Title (up) Meeting report: the role of environmental lighting and circadian disruption in cancer and other diseases Type Journal Article
Year 2007 Publication Environmental Health Perspectives Abbreviated Journal Environ Health Perspect
Volume 115 Issue 9 Pages 1357-1362
Keywords Human Health; Animals; *Circadian Rhythm; Environmental Exposure; Humans; *Lighting/adverse effects; *Neoplasms/etiology; Research; breast cancer; circadian rhythms; clock genes; lighting; melatonin; phototransduction; pineal gland
Abstract Light, including artificial light, has a range of effects on human physiology and behavior and can therefore alter human physiology when inappropriately timed. One example of potential light-induced disruption is the effect of light on circadian organization, including the production of several hormone rhythms. Changes in light-dark exposure (e.g., by nonday occupation or transmeridian travel) shift the timing of the circadian system such that internal rhythms can become desynchronized from both the external environment and internally with each other, impairing our ability to sleep and wake at the appropriate times and compromising physiologic and metabolic processes. Light can also have direct acute effects on neuroendocrine systems, for example, in suppressing melatonin synthesis or elevating cortisol production that may have untoward long-term consequences. For these reasons, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences convened a workshop of a diverse group of scientists to consider how best to conduct research on possible connections between lighting and health. According to the participants in the workshop, there are three broad areas of research effort that need to be addressed. First are the basic biophysical and molecular genetic mechanisms for phototransduction for circadian, neuroendocrine, and neurobehavioral regulation. Second are the possible physiologic consequences of disrupting these circadian regulatory processes such as on hormone production, particularly melatonin, and normal and neoplastic tissue growth dynamics. Third are effects of light-induced physiologic disruption on disease occurrence and prognosis, and how prevention and treatment could be improved by application of this knowledge.
Address Department of Community Medicine, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut 06030-6325, USA. bugs@uchc.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0091-6765 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:17805428; PMCID:PMC1964886 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 821
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Author Zukauskas, A.; Vaicekauskas, R.; Vitta, P.
Title (up) Optimization of solid-state lamps for photobiologically friendly mesopic lighting Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Applied Optics Abbreviated Journal Appl Opt
Volume 51 Issue 35 Pages 8423-8432
Keywords Lighting Systems; Circadian Rhythm; Color; Equipment Design; Humans; Light; *Lighting; Melatonin/metabolism; Photobiology/*methods; Semiconductors; Time Factors; Vision, Ocular
Abstract The circadian and visual-performance-based mesopic systems of photometry were applied for the optimization of the spectral power distributions (SPDs) of the solid-state sources of light for low-illuminance lighting applications. At mesopic adaptation luminances typical of outdoor lighting (0.1-2 cd/m(2)), the optimal SPDs were obtained through the minimization of the mesopic circadian action factor, which is the ratio of the circadian efficacy of radiation to mesopic luminous efficacy of radiation. For correlated color temperatures below ~3000 K, the optimized dichromatic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are shown to pose a lower circadian hazard than high-pressure sodium lamps and common warm white LEDs; also they are potentially more efficacious and have acceptable color rendition properties under mesopic conditions.
Address Institute of Applied Research, Vilnius University, Sauletekio al. 9-III, Vilnius LT-10222, Lithuania. arturas.zukauskas@ff.vu.lt
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0003-6935 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23262538 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 448
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Author Kamrowski, R.L.; Sutton, S.G.; Tobin, R.C.; Hamann, M.
Title (up) Potential applicability of persuasive communication to light-glow reduction efforts: a case study of marine turtle conservation Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Environmental Management Abbreviated Journal Environ Manage
Volume 54 Issue 3 Pages 583-595
Keywords Society; Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Animals; *Conservation of Natural Resources; Culture; Female; Humans; *Lighting; Male; Middle Aged; Persuasive Communication; Public Opinion; Queensland; Questionnaires; *Turtles; Young Adult
Abstract Artificial lighting along coastlines poses a significant threat to marine turtles due to the importance of light for their natural orientation at the nesting beach. Effective lighting management requires widespread support and participation, yet engaging the public with light reduction initiatives is difficult because benefits associated with artificial lighting are deeply entrenched within modern society. We present a case study from Queensland, Australia, where an active light-glow reduction campaign has been in place since 2008 to protect nesting turtles. Semi-structured questionnaires explored community beliefs about reducing light and evaluated the potential for using persuasive communication techniques based on the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to increase engagement with light reduction. Respondents (n = 352) had moderate to strong intentions to reduce light. TPB variables explained a significant proportion of variance in intention (multiple regression: R (2) = 0.54-0.69, P < 0.001), but adding a personal norm variable improved the model (R (2) = 0.73-0.79, P < 0.001). Significant differences in belief strength between campaign compliers and non-compliers suggest that targeting the beliefs reducing light leads to “increased protection of local turtles” (P < 0.01) and/or “benefits to the local economy” (P < 0.05), in combination with an appeal to personal norms, would produce the strongest persuasion potential for future communications. Selective legislation and commitment strategies may be further useful strategies to increase community light reduction. As artificial light continues to gain attention as a pollutant, our methods and findings will be of interest to anyone needing to manage public artificial lighting.
Address School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, 4811, Australia, ruth.kamrowski(at)my.jcu.edu.au
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0364-152X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24957580 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1283
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Author Meng, Y.; He, Z.; Yin, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, T.
Title (up) Quantitative calculation of human melatonin suppression induced by inappropriate light at night Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Medical & Biological Engineering & Computing Abbreviated Journal Med Biol Eng Comput
Volume 49 Issue 9 Pages 1083-1088
Keywords Algorithms; Circadian Rhythm/physiology/*radiation effects; Humans; *Lighting; Melatonin/*secretion; *Models, Biological; Retinal Cone Photoreceptor Cells/physiology/radiation effects; Retinal Ganglion Cells/physiology/radiation effects; Retinal Rod Photoreceptor Cells/physiology/radiation effects
Abstract Melatonin (C(1)(3)H(1)(6)N(2)O(2)) has a wide range of functions in the body. When is inappropriately exposed to light at night, human circadian rhythm will be interfered and then melatonin secretion will become abnormal. For nearly three decades great progresses have been achieved in analytic action spectra and melatonin suppression by various light conditions. However, so far few articles focused on the quantitative calculation of melatonin suppression induced by light. In this article, an algorithm is established, in which all the contributions of rods, cones, and intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells are considered. Calculation results accords with the experimental data in references very well, which indicate the validity of this algorithm. This algorithm can also interpret the rule of melatonin suppression varying with light correlated color temperature very well.
Address Photonics Research Center, School of Physics, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071, China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0140-0118 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:21717231 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 236
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Author Kyba, C.C.M.; Hänel, A.; Hölker, F.
Title (up) Redefining efficiency for outdoor lighting Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Energy & Environmental Science Abbreviated Journal Energy Environ. Sci.
Volume 7 Issue 6 Pages 1806
Keywords *Lighting; outdoor lighting; luminous efficiency; lighting standards; public policy; illuminance; street lighting
Abstract Improvements in the luminous efficiency of outdoor lamps might not result in energy savings or reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. The reason for this is a rebound effect: when light becomes cheaper, many users will increase illumination, and some previously unlit areas may become lit. We present three policy recommendations that work together to guarantee major energy reductions in street lighting systems. First, taking advantage of new technologies to use light only when and where it is needed. Second, defining maximum permitted illuminances for roadway lighting. Third, defining street lighting system efficiency in terms of kilowatt hours per kilometer per year. Adoption of these policies would not only save energy, but would greatly reduce the amount of light pollution produced by cities. The goal of lighting policy should be to provide the light needed for any given task while minimizing both the energy use and negative environmental side effects of the light.
Address Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Germany
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1754-5692 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 244
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