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Author Wright, K.P.J.; McHill, A.W.; Birks, B.R.; Griffin, B.R.; Rusterholz, T.; Chinoy, E.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Entrainment of the human circadian clock to the natural light-dark cycle Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2013 Publication Current Biology : CB Abbreviated Journal Curr Biol  
  Volume 23 Issue 16 Pages 1554-1558  
  Keywords Human Health; Adult; Circadian Clocks/*radiation effects; Female; Humans; *Lighting; Male; *Photoperiod; *Sunlight; Young Adult; Circadian Rhythm  
  Abstract The electric light is one of the most important human inventions. Sleep and other daily rhythms in physiology and behavior, however, evolved in the natural light-dark cycle [1], and electrical lighting is thought to have disrupted these rhythms. Yet how much the age of electrical lighting has altered the human circadian clock is unknown. Here we show that electrical lighting and the constructed environment is associated with reduced exposure to sunlight during the day, increased light exposure after sunset, and a delayed timing of the circadian clock as compared to a summer natural 14 hr 40 min:9 hr 20 min light-dark cycle camping. Furthermore, we find that after exposure to only natural light, the internal circadian clock synchronizes to solar time such that the beginning of the internal biological night occurs at sunset and the end of the internal biological night occurs before wake time just after sunrise. In addition, we find that later chronotypes show larger circadian advances when exposed to only natural light, making the timing of their internal clocks in relation to the light-dark cycle more similar to earlier chronotypes. These findings have important implications for understanding how modern light exposure patterns contribute to late sleep schedules and may disrupt sleep and circadian clocks.  
  Address Sleep and Chronobiology Laboratory, Department of Integrative Physiology, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309-0354, USA. kenneth.wright@colorado.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23910656; PMCID:PMC4020279 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 505  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Evans, J.A.; Carter, S.N.; Freeman, D.A.; Gorman, M.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dim nighttime illumination alters photoperiodic responses of hamsters through the intergeniculate leaflet and other photic pathways Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2012 Publication Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Neuroscience  
  Volume 202 Issue Pages 300-308  
  Keywords Animals; Biological Clocks/physiology; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Cricetinae; Darkness; Data Interpretation, Statistical; Geniculate Bodies/*physiology; *Lighting; Male; Motor Activity/physiology; Phodopus; *Photoperiod; Visual Pathways/*physiology  
  Abstract In mammals, light entrains the central pacemaker within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) through both a direct neuronal projection from the retina and an indirect projection from the intergeniculate leaflet (IGL) of the thalamus. Although light comparable in intensity to moonlight is minimally effective at resetting the phase of the circadian clock, dimly lit and completely dark nights are nevertheless perceived differentially by the circadian system, even when nighttime illumination is below putative thresholds for phase resetting. Under a variety of experimental paradigms, dim nighttime illumination exerts effects that may be characterized as enhancing the plasticity of circadian entrainment. For example, relative to completely dark nights, dimly lit nights accelerate development of photoperiodic responses of Siberian hamsters transferred from summer to winter day lengths. Here we assess the neural pathways underlying this response by testing whether IGL lesions eliminate the effects of dim nighttime illumination under short day lengths. Consistent with previous work, dimly lit nights facilitated the expansion of activity duration under short day lengths. Ablation of the IGL, moreover, did not influence photoperiodic responses in animals held under completely dark nights. However, among animals that were provided dimly lit nights, IGL lesions prevented the short-day typical expansion of activity duration as well as the seasonally appropriate gonadal regression and reduction in body weight. Thus, the present data indicate that the IGL plays a central role in mediating the facilitative effects of dim nighttime illumination under short day lengths, but in the absence of the IGL, dim light at night influences photoperiodic responses through residual photic pathways.  
  Address Department of Psychology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA. jevans@msm.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0306-4522 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22155265; PMCID:PMC3578228 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 87  
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Author Fonken, L.K.; Kitsmiller, E.; Smale, L.; Nelson, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dim nighttime light impairs cognition and provokes depressive-like responses in a diurnal rodent Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2012 Publication Journal of Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal J Biol Rhythms  
  Volume 27 Issue 4 Pages 319-327  
  Keywords Analysis of Variance; Animals; CA1 Region, Hippocampal/cytology; CA3 Region, Hippocampal/cytology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Cognition/*physiology/radiation effects; Corticosterone/blood; Dendrites/physiology/radiation effects; Dentate Gyrus/cytology; Depressive Disorder/*physiopathology; Food Preferences/physiology/radiation effects; Light; Male; Maze Learning/physiology/radiation effects; Motor Activity/physiology/radiation effects; Murinae/*physiology; Neurons/drug effects/physiology; *Photoperiod; Swimming/physiology  
  Abstract Circadian disruption is a common by-product of modern life. Although jet lag and shift work are well-documented challenges to circadian organization, many more subtle environmental changes cause circadian disruption. For example, frequent fluctuations in the timing of the sleep/wake schedule, as well as exposure to nighttime lighting, likely affect the circadian system. Most studies of these effects have focused on nocturnal rodents, which are very different from diurnal species with respect to their patterns of light exposure and the effects that light can have on their activity. Thus, the authors investigated the effect of nighttime light on behavior and the brain of a diurnal rodent, the Nile grass rat. Following 3 weeks of exposure to standard light/dark (LD; 14:10 light [~150 lux] /dark [0 lux]) or dim light at night (dLAN; 14:10 light [~150 lux] /dim [5 lux]), rats underwent behavioral testing, and hippocampal neurons within CA1, CA3, and the dentate gyrus (DG) were examined. Three behavioral effects of dLAN were observed: (1) decreased preference for a sucrose solution, (2) increased latency to float in a forced swim test, and (3) impaired learning and memory in the Barnes maze. Light at night also reduced dendritic length in DG and basilar CA1 dendrites. Dendritic length in the DG positively correlated with sucrose consumption in the sucrose anhedonia task. Nighttime light exposure did not disrupt the pattern of circadian locomotor activity, and all grass rats maintained a diurnal activity pattern. Together, these data suggest that exposure to dLAN can alter affective responses and impair cognition in a diurnal animal.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. fonken.1@osu.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0748-7304 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22855576 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 91  
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Author Sinam, B.; Sharma, S.; Thakurdas, P.; Joshi, D.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Bright photophase accelerates re-entrainment after experimental jetlag in Drosophila Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2012 Publication Die Naturwissenschaften Abbreviated Journal Naturwissenschaften  
  Volume 99 Issue 7 Pages 575-578  
  Keywords Animals; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Drosophila/*physiology/*radiation effects; *Light; Motor Activity/physiology; *Photoperiod  
  Abstract The efficacy of bright photophase (BP) in accelerating the re-entrainment of Drosophila biarmipes rhythm following 8 h phase advance and delay of light-dark (LD) cycle was examined by subjecting the flies to 24 h LD cycles with dim photophase (DP) at 30 lx and BP at 300 lx. Re-entrainment was analysed by using the activity onset, activity offset and the duration of activity. Following LD advance or delay, the BP flies re-entrained faster than the DP flies which was attributed to the enhanced zeitgeber strength of BP. Nevertheless, the re-entrainment was a protracted process even in the BP flies since the activity offsets underwent more transients than the activity onsets. Thus, this study demonstrates that the BP accelerates the re-entrainment in D. biarmipes. It, however, also reveals that the re-entrainment is a prolonged process when the activity onset and offset are regarded as the rhythm markers.  
  Address Center for Biological Rhythm Research, Ahmednagar College, Ahmednagar, 414001, MS, India  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-1042 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22684252 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 109  
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Author Dumont, M.; Lanctot, V.; Cadieux-Viau, R.; Paquet, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Melatonin production and light exposure of rotating night workers Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2012 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 29 Issue 2 Pages 203-210  
  Keywords Adult; Animals; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Humans; *Light; Melatonin/*analogs & derivatives/*biosynthesis/urine; Neoplasms/etiology; *Photoperiod; Risk Factors; Sleep/physiology; *Work; Work Schedule Tolerance  
  Abstract Decreased melatonin production, due to acute suppression of pineal melatonin secretion by light exposure during night work, has been suggested to underlie higher cancer risks associated with prolonged experience of night work. However, the association between light exposure and melatonin production has never been measured in the field. In this study, 24-h melatonin production and ambulatory light exposure were assessed during both night-shift and day/evening-shift periods in 13 full-time rotating shiftworkers. Melatonin production was estimated with the excretion of urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6s), and light exposure was measured with an ambulatory photometer. There was no difference in total 24-h aMT6s excretion between the two work periods. The night-shift period was characterized by a desynchrony between melatonin and sleep-wake rhythms, as shown by higher melatonin production during work and lower melatonin production during sleep when working night shifts than when working day/evening shifts. Light exposure during night work showed no correlation with aMT6s excreted during the night of work (p > .5), or with the difference in 24-h aMT6s excretion between the two work periods (p > .1). However, light exposure during night work was negatively correlated with total 24-h aMT6s excretion over the entire night-shift period (p < .01). In conclusion, there was no evidence of direct melatonin suppression during night work in this population. However, higher levels of light exposure during night work may have decreased total melatonin production, possibly by initiating re-entrainment and causing internal desynchrony. This interpretation is consistent with the proposition that circadian disruption, of which decreased melatonin production is only one of the adverse consequences, could be the mediator between night shiftwork and cancer risks.  
  Address Chronobiology Laboratory, Center for Advanced Research in Sleep Medicine, Sacre-Coeur Hospital of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. marie.dumont@umontreal.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22324558 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 138  
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