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Author Green, A.; Barak, S.; Shine, L.; Kahane, A.; Dagan, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Exposure by males to light emitted from media devices at night is linked with decline of sperm quality and correlated with sleep quality measures Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 414-424  
  Keywords Human Health; *Alan; *Sleep; *digital device; *light; *male fertility; *melatonin; *sleepiness; *sperm quality  
  Abstract The last several decades have been characterized by the widespread usage of digital devices, especially smartphones. At the same time, there have been reports of both decline in sleep duration and quality and male fertility decline. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between evening exposure to the light-emitting screens of digital media devices and measures of both sleep and sperm quality. Semen samples were obtained from 116 men undergoing fertility evaluation for the following sperm variables: volume (mL), pH, sperm concentration (million/mL), motility percentage (progressive% + non-progressive motility%), and total sperm count. Exposure to the screens of electronic devices and sleep habits was obtained by means of a questionnaire. Smartphone and tablet usage in the evening and after bedtime was negatively correlated with sperm motility (-0.392; -0.369; p < .05), sperm progressive motility (-0.322; -0.299; p < .05), and sperm concentration (-0.169; p < .05), and positively correlated with the percentage of immotile sperm (0.382; 0.344; p < .05). In addition, sleep duration was positively correlated with sperm total and progressive motility (0.249; 0.233; p < .05) and negatively correlated with semen pH (-0.349; p < .05). A significant negative correlation was observed between subjective sleepiness and total and progressive motility (-0.264; p < .05) as well as total motile sperm number (-0.173; p < .05). The results of this study support a link between evening and post-bedtime exposure to light-emitting digital media screens and sperm quality. Further research is required to establish the proposed causative link and may lead to the future development of relevant therapeutic and lifestyle interventions.  
  Address The Human Biology Department, Haifa University, Haifa, Israel; amitg ( at ) assuta.co.il  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Taylor & Francis Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32126861 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3410  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kloog, I.; Portnov, B.A.; Rennert, H.S.; Haim, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Does the modern urbanized sleeping habitat pose a breast cancer risk? Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 28 Issue 1 Pages 76-80  
  Keywords Human Health; ged; Alcohol Drinking/adverse effects; Breast Neoplasms/*etiology; Case-Control Studies; Circadian Rhythm/*radiation effects; Female; Humans; Light/*adverse effects; Middle Aged; Odds Ratio; Risk Factors; *Sleep; Urbanization  
  Abstract Due to its disruptive effects on circadian rhythms and sleep deprivation at night, shiftworking is currently recognized as a risk factor for breast cancer (BC). As revealed by the present analysis based on a comparative case-control study of 1679 women, exposure to light-at-night (LAN) in the “sleeping habitat” is significantly associated with BC risk (odds ratio [OR] = 1.220, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.118-1.311; p < .001), controlling for education, ethnicity, fertility, and alcohol consumption. The novelty of the present research is that, to the best of the authors' knowledge, it is the first study to have identified an unequivocal positive association between bedroom-light intensity and BC risk. Thus, according to the results of the present study, not only should artificial light exposure in the working environment be considered as a potential risk factor for BC, but also LAN in the “sleeping habitat.”  
  Address Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, Graduate School of Management, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21182407 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 770  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Panagiotou, M.; Deboer, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Chronic Dim-light-at-night Exposure on Sleep in Young and Aged Mice Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Neuroscience  
  Volume 426 Issue Pages 154-167  
  Keywords Aging; Animals; Behavior, Animal/physiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; *Light; Male; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Motor Activity/physiology; Photoperiod; Sleep/*physiology; Sleep Deprivation/physiopathology; Wakefulness/*physiology; *aging; *dim-light-at-night (DLAN); *electroencephalogram; *sleep; *sleep deprivation; *slow-wave-activity  
  Abstract Dim-light-at-night (DLAN) exposure is associated with health problems, such as metabolic disruptions, immunological modulations, oxidative stress, sleep problems, and altered circadian timing. Neurophysiological parameters, including sleep patterns, are altered in the course of aging in a similar way. Here, we investigated the effect of chronic (three months) DLAN exposure (12L:12Dim-light, 75:5lux) on sleep and the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG), and rest-activity behavior in young (6-month-old, n=9) and aged (18- n=8, 24-month-old, n=6) C57BL/6J mice and compared with age-matched controls (n=11, n=9 and n=8, respectively). We recorded the EEG and electromyogram continuously for 48-h and conducted a 6-h sleep-deprivation. A delay in the phase angle of entrainment of locomotor activity and daily vigilance state rhythms was apparent in mice following DLAN exposure, throughout the whole age spectrum, rendering sleep characteristics similar among the three age DLAN groups and significantly different from the age-matched controls. Notably, slow-wave-activity in NREM sleep (SWA, EEG power density in 0.5-4.0Hz) was differentially altered in young and aged DLAN mice. Particularly, SWA increased as a function of age, which was further accentuated following DLAN exposure. However, this was not found in the young DLAN animals, which were characterized by the lowest SWA levels. Concluding, long-term DLAN exposure induced more pronounced alterations in the sleep architecture of young mice, towards an aging phenotype, while it enhanced age-associated sleep changes in the older groups. Our data suggest that irrespective of age, chronic DLAN exposure deteriorates sleep behavior and may consequently impact general health.  
  Address Laboratory for Neurophysiology, Department of Cell and Chemical Biology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands. t.de_boer ( at ) lumc.nl  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0306-4522 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31846754 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3387  
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Author Santhi, N.; Thorne, H.C.; van der Veen, D.R.; Johnsen, S.; Mills, S.L.; Hommes, V.; Schlangen, L.J.M.; Archer, S.N.; Dijk, D.-J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The spectral composition of evening light and individual differences in the suppression of melatonin and delay of sleep in humans Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Journal of Pineal Research Abbreviated Journal J Pineal Res  
  Volume 53 Issue 1 Pages 47-59  
  Keywords Human Health; Adult; *Circadian Clocks; Cross-Sectional Studies; Electroencephalography; Female; Humans; Male; Melatonin/*metabolism; Photic Stimulation; *Photoperiod; Rod Opsins/*metabolism; *Sleep; *Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm/etiology/metabolism/physiopathology; Time Factors  
  Abstract The effect of light on circadian rhythms and sleep is mediated by a multi-component photoreceptive system of rods, cones and melanopsin-expressing intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells. The intensity and spectral sensitivity characteristics of this system are to be fully determined. Whether the intensity and spectral composition of light exposure at home in the evening is such that it delays circadian rhythms and sleep also remains to be established. We monitored light exposure at home during 6-8wk and assessed light effects on sleep and circadian rhythms in the laboratory. Twenty-two women and men (23.1+/-4.7yr) participated in a six-way, cross-over design using polychromatic light conditions relevant to the light exposure at home, but with reduced, intermediate or enhanced efficacy with respect to the photopic and melanopsin systems. The evening rise of melatonin, sleepiness and EEG-assessed sleep onset varied significantly (P<0.01) across the light conditions, and these effects appeared to be largely mediated by the melanopsin, rather than the photopic system. Moreover, there were individual differences in the sensitivity to the disruptive effect of light on melatonin, which were robust against experimental manipulations (intra-class correlation=0.44). The data show that light at home in the evening affects circadian physiology and imply that the spectral composition of artificial light can be modified to minimize this disruptive effect on sleep and circadian rhythms. These findings have implications for our understanding of the contribution of artificial light exposure to sleep and circadian rhythm disorders such as delayed sleep phase disorder.  
  Address Surrey Sleep Research Centre, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, UK. n.santhi@surrey.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-3098 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22017511 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 802  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sasseville, A.; Benhaberou-Brun, D.; Fontaine, C.; Charon, M.-C.; Hebert, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Wearing blue-blockers in the morning could improve sleep of workers on a permanent night schedule: a pilot study Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 26 Issue 5 Pages 913-925  
  Keywords Adaptation, Physiological; Adult; Biological Clocks; Circadian Rhythm; Female; Humans; *Light; Male; Middle Aged; Photoperiod; Pilot Projects; Seasons; *Sleep; Wakefulness; *Work Schedule Tolerance; shift work; blue light; blue blocker; light therapy  
  Abstract Night shiftworkers often complain of disturbed sleep during the day. This could be partly caused by morning sunlight exposure during the commute home, which tends to maintain the circadian clock on a daytime rhythm. The circadian clock is most sensitive to the blue portion of the visible spectrum, so our aim was to determine if blocking short wavelengths of light below 540 nm could improve daytime sleep quality and nighttime vigilance of night shiftworkers. Eight permanent night shiftworkers (32-56 yrs of age) of Quebec City's Canada Post distribution center were evaluated during summertime, and twenty others (24-55 yrs of age) during fall and winter. Timing, efficacy, and fragmentation of daytime sleep were analyzed over four weeks by a wrist activity monitor, and subjective vigilance was additionally assessed at the end of the night shift in the fall-winter group. The first two weeks served as baseline and the remaining two as experimental weeks when workers had to wear blue-blockers glasses, either just before leaving the workplace at the end of their shift (summer group) or 2 h before the end of the night shift (fall-winter group). They all had to wear the glasses when outside during the day until 16:00 h. When wearing the glasses, workers slept, on average +/-SD, 32+/-29 and 34+/-60 more min/day, increased their sleep efficacy by 1.95+/-2.17% and 4.56+/-6.1%, and lowered their sleep fragmentation by 1.74+/-1.36% and 4.22+/-9.16% in the summer and fall-winter group, respectively. Subjective vigilance also generally improved on Fridays in the fall-winter group. Blue-blockers seem to improve daytime sleep of permanent night-shift workers.  
  Address Centre de Recherche Universite Laval Robert-Giffard/Department of Oto Rhino Laryngology and Ophtalmology, Universite Laval, Quebec, Canada  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:19637050 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 295  
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