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Author Knutsson, A.; Alfredsson, L.; Karlsson, B.; Akerstedt, T.; Fransson, E.I.; Westerholm, P.; Westerlund, H.
Title Breast cancer among shift workers: results of the WOLF longitudinal cohort study Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication (down) Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health Abbreviated Journal Scand J Work Environ Health
Volume 39 Issue 2 Pages 170-177
Keywords Adult; Aged; Breast Neoplasms/*epidemiology/etiology; Circadian Rhythm; Female; Humans; Incidence; Longitudinal Studies; Middle Aged; Proportional Hazards Models; Risk Assessment; Sweden/epidemiology; *Work Schedule Tolerance; oncogenesis
Abstract OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate whether shift work (with or without night work) is associated with increased risk of breast cancer. METHODS: The population consisted of 4036 women. Data were obtained from WOLF (Work, Lipids, and Fibrinogen), a longitudinal cohort study. Information about baseline characteristics was based on questionnaire responses and medical examination. Cancer incidence from baseline to follow-up was obtained from the national cancer registry. Two exposure groups were identified: shift work with and without night work. The group with day work only was used as the reference group in the analysis. Cox regression analysis was used to calculate relative risk. RESULTS: In total, 94 women developed breast cancer during follow-up. The average follow-up time was 12.4 years. The hazard ratio for breast cancer was 1.23 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.70-2.17] for shifts without night work and 2.02 (95% CI 1.03-3.95) for shifts with night work. When including only women <60 years of age, the risk estimates were 1.18 (95% CI 0.67-2.07) for shifts without night work, and 2.15 (95% CI 1.10-4.21) for shifts with night work. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate an increased risk for breast cancer among women who work shifts that includes night work.
Address Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall. Sweden. Anders.Knutsson@miun.se
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0355-3140 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23007867 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 154
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Author Thorn, L.; Hucklebridge, F.; Esgate, A.; Evans, P.; Clow, A.
Title The effect of dawn simulation on the cortisol response to awakening in healthy participants Type Journal Article
Year 2004 Publication (down) Psychoneuroendocrinology Abbreviated Journal Psychoneuroendocrinology
Volume 29 Issue 7 Pages 925-930
Keywords Human Health; Adult; Affect/*physiology/radiation effects; Arousal/*physiology/radiation effects; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Female; Humans; Hydrocortisone/analysis/*physiology/radiation effects; *Light; Male; Middle Aged; Reference Values; Saliva/chemistry; Wakefulness/*physiology/radiation effects
Abstract Bright light exposure after awakening has been shown to elevate cortisol levels in healthy participants. The present study examined the effect of dawn simulation (a treatment for seasonal affective disorder) on the cortisol response to awakening and mood. Twelve healthy participants were supplied with a dawn simulator (The Natural Alarm Clock, Outside In, Cambridge Ltd), a bedside light that increases in intensity prior to awakening to approximately 250 lux over 30 mins when an audible alarm sounds. A counterbalanced study was performed on 4 consecutive normal weekdays, two of which were control days (no dawn simulation) and two experimental (dawn simulation). Saliva samples were taken immediately on awakening then at 15, 30 and 45 minutes post awakening on all 4 study-days. Total cortisol production during the first 45 mins after awakening was found to be significantly higher in the experimental condition than in the control condition. Participants also reported greater arousal in the experimental condition and there was a trend for an association between increased arousal and increased cortisol secretory activity under dawn simulation. This study provides supportive evidence for the role of light and the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the awakening cortisol response.
Address Department of Psychology, University of Westminster, 309 Regent Street, London W1R 8AL, UK
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0306-4530 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:15177708 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 824
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Author Taillard, J.; Capelli, A.; Sagaspe, P.; Anund, A.; Akerstedt, T.; Philip, P.
Title In-car nocturnal blue light exposure improves motorway driving: a randomized controlled trial Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication (down) PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One
Volume 7 Issue 10 Pages e46750
Keywords Adult; *Automobile Driving; Caffeine/pharmacology; Coffee/chemistry; Cross-Over Studies; Double-Blind Method; Fatigue/*prevention & control; Humans; Light; Male; Middle Aged; *Photic Stimulation; Placebos; Psychomotor Performance/drug effects/radiation effects; Reproducibility of Results; Sleep Deprivation; Sleep Stages/radiation effects; Wakefulness/drug effects/physiology/*radiation effects; blue light
Abstract Prolonged wakefulness greatly decreases nocturnal driving performance. The development of in-car countermeasures is a future challenge to prevent sleep-related accidents. The aim of this study is to determine whether continuous exposure to monochromatic light in the short wavelengths (blue light), placed on the dashboard, improves night-time driving performance. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study, 48 healthy male participants (aged 20-50 years) drove 400 km (250 miles) on motorway during night-time. They randomly and consecutively received either continuous blue light exposure (GOLite, Philips, 468 nm) during driving or 2*200 mg of caffeine or placebo of caffeine before and during the break. Treatments were separated by at least 1 week. The outcomes were number of inappropriate line crossings (ILC) and mean standard deviation of the lateral position (SDLP). Eight participants (17%) complained about dazzle during blue light exposure and were removed from the analysis. Results from the 40 remaining participants (mean age +/- SD: 32.9+/-11.1) showed that countermeasures reduced the number of inappropriate line crossings (ILC) (F(2,91.11) = 6.64; p<0.05). Indeed, ILC were lower with coffee (12.51 [95% CI, 5.86 to 19.66], p = 0.001) and blue light (14.58 [CI, 8.75 to 22.58], p = 0.003) than with placebo (26.42 [CI, 19.90 to 33.71]). Similar results were found for SDLP. Treatments did not modify the quality, quantity and timing of 3 subsequent nocturnal sleep episodes. Despite a lesser tolerance, a non-inferior efficacy of continuous nocturnal blue light exposure compared with caffeine suggests that this in-car countermeasure, used occasionally, could be used to fight nocturnal sleepiness at the wheel in blue light-tolerant drivers, whatever their age. More studies are needed to determine the reproducibility of data and to verify if it can be generalized to women. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01070004.
Address University of Bordeaux, Sommeil, Attention et Neuropsychiatrie, USR 3413, Bordeaux, France. jack.taillard@gmail.com
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23094031; PMCID:PMC3477137 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 347
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Author Hansen, J.; Lassen, C.F.
Title Nested case-control study of night shift work and breast cancer risk among women in the Danish military Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication (down) Occupational and Environmental Medicine Abbreviated Journal Occup Environ Med
Volume 69 Issue 8 Pages 551-556
Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Breast Neoplasms/*etiology; Case-Control Studies; *Circadian Rhythm; Denmark/epidemiology; Female; Humans; Logistic Models; Middle Aged; Military Personnel; *Occupations; Odds Ratio; Risk Factors; *Sunlight; *Work; *Work Schedule Tolerance; oncogenesis
Abstract OBJECTIVES: Growing but limited evidence suggests that night shift work is associated with breast cancer. The authors conducted a nationwide case-control study nested within a cohort of 18,551 female military employees born in 1929-1968 to investigate the risk for breast cancer after night shift work and to explore the role of leisure time sun exposure and diurnal preference. METHODS: The authors documented 218 cases of breast cancer (1990-2003) and selected 899 age-matched controls from the cohort by incidence density sampling. Information on shift work, sun exposure habits, diurnal preference and other potential confounders was obtained from a structured questionnaire. ORs were estimated by multivariate conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: Overall, the authors observed an adjusted OR of 1.4 (95% CI 0.9 to 2.1) among women with ever compared with never night shifts. The RR for breast cancer tended to increase with increasing number of years of night shift work (p=0.03) and with cumulative number of shifts (p=0.02),with a neutral risk for fewer than three night shifts per week. The OR for the group with the highest tertile of cumulative exposure was 2.3 (95% CI 1.2 to 4.6). The most pronounced effect of night shift work on breast cancer risk was observed in women with morning chronotype preference and intense night shifts (OR=3.9, 95% CI 1.6 to 9.5). Night shift workers tended to sunbathe more frequently than day workers. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that frequent night shift work increases the risk for breast cancer and suggest a higher risk with longer duration of intense night shifts. Women with morning preference who worked on night shifts tended to have a higher risk than those with evening preference.
Address Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Strandboulevarden 49, Copenhagen DK2100, Denmark. johnni@cancer.dk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1351-0711 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:22645325 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 156
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Author Grundy, A.; Richardson, H.; Burstyn, I.; Lohrisch, C.; SenGupta, S.K.; Lai, A.S.; Lee, D.; Spinelli, J.J.; Aronson, K.J.
Title Increased risk of breast cancer associated with long-term shift work in Canada Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication (down) Occupational and Environmental Medicine Abbreviated Journal Occup Environ Med
Volume 70 Issue 12 Pages 831-838
Keywords Human Health; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology/*etiology/metabolism; British Columbia/epidemiology; Case-Control Studies; Female; Humans; Menopause; Middle Aged; Occupational Diseases/*epidemiology; Ontario/epidemiology; Receptors, Estrogen/metabolism; Receptors, Progesterone/metabolism; Risk Factors; Tumor Markers, Biological/metabolism; Work Schedule Tolerance/*physiology; Young Adult
Abstract OBJECTIVES: Long-term night work has been suggested as a risk factor for breast cancer; however, additional studies with more comprehensive methods of exposure assessment to capture the diversity of shift patterns are needed. As well, few previous studies have considered the role of hormone receptor subtype. METHODS: Relationships between night shift work and breast cancer were examined among 1134 breast cancer cases and 1179 controls, frequency-matched by age in Vancouver, British Columbia, and Kingston, Ontario. Self-reported lifetime occupational histories were assessed for night shift work, and hormone receptor status obtained from tumour pathology records. RESULTS: With approximately one-third of cases and controls ever employed in night shift work, associations with duration demonstrated no relationship between either 0-14 or 15-29 years, while an association was apparent for >/=30 years (OR=2.21, 95% CI 1.14 to 4.31). This association with long-term night shift work is robust to alternative definitions of prolonged shift work, with similar results for both health and non-health care workers. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term night shift work in a diverse mix of occupations is associated with increased breast cancer risk and not limited to nurses, as in most previous studies.
Address Department of Public Health Sciences and Queen's Cancer Research Institute, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1351-0711 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23817841 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 757
Permanent link to this record