toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Cajochen, C.; Altanay-Ekici, S.; Munch, M.; Frey, S.; Knoblauch, V.; Wirz-Justice, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence that the lunar cycle influences human sleep Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication (up) Current Biology : CB Abbreviated Journal Curr Biol  
  Volume 23 Issue 15 Pages 1485-1488  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Cross-Sectional Studies; Electroencephalography; Female; Humans; Hydrocortisone/analysis/metabolism; Male; Melatonin/analysis/metabolism; Middle Aged; Moon; Nontherapeutic Human Experimentation; Periodicity; Saliva/metabolism; Sleep/*physiology; Sleep Stages/physiology; Young Adult  
  Abstract Endogenous rhythms of circalunar periodicity ( approximately 29.5 days) and their underlying molecular and genetic basis have been demonstrated in a number of marine species [1, 2]. In contrast, there is a great deal of folklore but no consistent association of moon cycles with human physiology and behavior [3]. Here we show that subjective and objective measures of sleep vary according to lunar phase and thus may reflect circalunar rhythmicity in humans. To exclude confounders such as increased light at night or the potential bias in perception regarding a lunar influence on sleep, we retrospectively analyzed sleep structure, electroencephalographic activity during non-rapid-eye-movement (NREM) sleep, and secretion of the hormones melatonin and cortisol found under stringently controlled laboratory conditions in a cross-sectional setting. At no point during and after the study were volunteers or investigators aware of the a posteriori analysis relative to lunar phase. We found that around full moon, electroencephalogram (EEG) delta activity during NREM sleep, an indicator of deep sleep, decreased by 30%, time to fall asleep increased by 5 min, and EEG-assessed total sleep duration was reduced by 20 min. These changes were associated with a decrease in subjective sleep quality and diminished endogenous melatonin levels. This is the first reliable evidence that a lunar rhythm can modulate sleep structure in humans when measured under the highly controlled conditions of a circadian laboratory study protocol without time cues.  
  Address Centre for Chronobiology, Psychiatric Hospital of the University of Basel, 4012 Basel, Switzerland. christian.cajochen@upkbs.ch  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23891110 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 140  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Abay, K.A.; Amare, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Night light intensity and women's body weight: Evidence from Nigeria Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication (up) Economics and Human Biology Abbreviated Journal Econ Hum Biol  
  Volume 31 Issue Pages 238-248  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Human Health; Adolescent; Adult; Body Mass Index; *Body Weight; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; Health Surveys; Humans; Lighting/*statistics & numerical data; Middle Aged; Nigeria/epidemiology; Obesity/epidemiology; Overweight/*epidemiology; Prevalence; *Urbanization; Young Adult; *Bmi; *Nigeria; *Night light; *Obesity; *Overweight; *Urbanization  
  Abstract The prevalence of overweight and obesity are increasing in many African countries and hence becoming regional public health challenges. We employ satellite-based night light intensity data as a proxy for urbanization to investigate the relationship between urbanization and women's body weight. We use two rounds of the Demographic and Health Survey data from Nigeria. We employ both nonparametric and parametric estimation approaches that exploit both the cross-sectional and longitudinal variations in night light intensities. Our empirical analysis reveals nonlinear relationships between night light intensity and women's body weight measures. Doubling the sample's average level of night light intensity is associated with up to a ten percentage point increase in the probability of overweight. However, despite the generally positive relationship between night light intensity and women's body weight, the strength of the relationship varies across the assorted stages of night light intensity. Early stages of night light intensity are not significantly associated with women's body weight, while higher stages of nightlight intensities are associated with higher rates of overweight and obesity. Given that night lights are strong predictors of urbanization and related economic activities, our results hint at nonlinear relationships between various stages of urbanization and women's body weight.  
  Address International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), USA. Electronic address: M.Amare@cgiar.org  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1570-677X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30312904 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2714  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kamrowski, R.L.; Sutton, S.G.; Tobin, R.C.; Hamann, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Potential applicability of persuasive communication to light-glow reduction efforts: a case study of marine turtle conservation Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication (up) Environmental Management Abbreviated Journal Environ Manage  
  Volume 54 Issue 3 Pages 583-595  
  Keywords Society; Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Animals; *Conservation of Natural Resources; Culture; Female; Humans; *Lighting; Male; Middle Aged; Persuasive Communication; Public Opinion; Queensland; Questionnaires; *Turtles; Young Adult  
  Abstract Artificial lighting along coastlines poses a significant threat to marine turtles due to the importance of light for their natural orientation at the nesting beach. Effective lighting management requires widespread support and participation, yet engaging the public with light reduction initiatives is difficult because benefits associated with artificial lighting are deeply entrenched within modern society. We present a case study from Queensland, Australia, where an active light-glow reduction campaign has been in place since 2008 to protect nesting turtles. Semi-structured questionnaires explored community beliefs about reducing light and evaluated the potential for using persuasive communication techniques based on the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to increase engagement with light reduction. Respondents (n = 352) had moderate to strong intentions to reduce light. TPB variables explained a significant proportion of variance in intention (multiple regression: R (2) = 0.54-0.69, P < 0.001), but adding a personal norm variable improved the model (R (2) = 0.73-0.79, P < 0.001). Significant differences in belief strength between campaign compliers and non-compliers suggest that targeting the beliefs reducing light leads to “increased protection of local turtles” (P < 0.01) and/or “benefits to the local economy” (P < 0.05), in combination with an appeal to personal norms, would produce the strongest persuasion potential for future communications. Selective legislation and commitment strategies may be further useful strategies to increase community light reduction. As artificial light continues to gain attention as a pollutant, our methods and findings will be of interest to anyone needing to manage public artificial lighting.  
  Address School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, 4811, Australia, ruth.kamrowski(at)my.jcu.edu.au  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0364-152X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24957580 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1283  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wood, J.M.; Tyrrell, R.A.; Carberry, T.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Limitations in drivers' ability to recognize pedestrians at night Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication (up) Human Factors Abbreviated Journal Hum Factors  
  Volume 47 Issue 3 Pages 644-653  
  Keywords Vision; Public Safety; Adult; Age Factors; Aged; *Automobile Driving/psychology; Clothing; *Darkness; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Reaction Time; Task Performance and Analysis; Visual Perception  
  Abstract This study quantified drivers' ability to recognize pedestrians at night. Ten young and 10 older participants drove around a closed road circuit and responded when they first recognized a pedestrian. Four pedestrian clothing and two beam conditions were tested. Results demonstrate that driver age, clothing configuration, headlamp beam, and glare all significantly affect performance. Drivers recognized only 5% of pedestrians in the most challenging condition (low beams, black clothing, glare), whereas drivers recognized 100% of the pedestrians who wore retroreflective clothing configured to depict biological motion (no glare). In the absence of glare, mean recognition distances varied from 0.0 m (older drivers, low beam, black clothing) to 220 m (722 feet; younger drivers, high beam, retroreflective biomotion). These data provide new motivation to minimize interactions between vehicular and pedestrian traffic at night and suggest garment designs to maximize pedestrian conspicuity when these interactions are unavoidable.  
  Address Center for Eye Research, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia. j.wood@qut.edu.au  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0018-7208 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:16435703 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2804  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kujanik, S.; Mikulecky, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Circadian and ultradian extrasystole rhythms in healthy individuals at elevated versus lowland altitudes Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication (up) International Journal of Biometeorology Abbreviated Journal Int J Biometeorol  
  Volume 54 Issue 5 Pages 531-538  
  Keywords Human Health; Acclimatization/physiology; Aged; *Altitude; Anoxia/etiology; Cardiac Complexes, Premature/*physiopathology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Electrocardiography, Ambulatory; Heart Rate/*physiology; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Reference Values; Time Factors  
  Abstract We defined chronobiologic norms for supraventricular and ventricular single extrasystoles (SV and VE, respectively) in healthy older males in lowland areas. The study was extended to higher altitudes, where hypobaric hypoxia was expected to increase extrasystole frequency, while perhaps not changing rhythmicity. In healthy men (lowland n = 37, altitude n = 22), aged 49-72 years, mean numbers of SVs and VEs were counted over a 24-h period. Cosinor regression was used to test the 24-h rhythm and its 2nd-10th harmonics. The resulting approximating function for either extrasystole type includes its point, 95% confidence interval of the mean, and 95% tolerance for single measurement estimates. Separate hourly differences (delta) between altitude and lowland (n = 59) were also analysed. Hourly means were significantly higher in the mountains versus lowland, by +0.8 beats/h on average for SVs, and by +0.9 beats/h for VEs. A relatively rich chronogram for VEs in mountains versus lowland exists. Delta VEs clearly display a 24-h component and its 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 7th harmonics. This results in significantly higher accumulation of VEs around 8.00 a.m., 11.00 a.m. and 3.00 p.m. in the mountains. The increase in extrasystole occurrence in the mountains is probably caused by higher hypobaric hypoxia and resulting sympathetic drive. Healthy men at elevated altitudes show circadian and several ultradian rhythms of single VEs dependent on the hypoxia level. This new methodological approach--evaluating the differences between two locations using delta values--promises to provide deeper insight into the occurrence of premature beats.  
  Address Dept of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Pavol Jozef Safarik University, Trieda SNP 1, 040 66 Kosice, Slovak Republic. stefan.kujanik@upjs.sk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0020-7128 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:20195873 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 774  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: