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Author Clewley, G.D.; Plummer, K.E.; Robinson, R.A.; Simm, C.H.; Toms, M.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effect of artificial lighting on the arrival time of birds using garden feeding stations in winter: A missed opportunity? Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Urban Ecosystems Abbreviated Journal Urban Ecosystems  
  Volume 19 Issue 2 Pages 535–546  
  Keywords Animals; Artificial light; Citizen science; Foraging; Garden birds; Supplementary feeding; Urbanization  
  Abstract The proliferation of artificial lighting at night is one of the key anthropogenic changes associated with urbanised areas as well as some non-urban areas. Disruption to natural light/dark regimes can have considerable effects on the timing of different behaviours of birds, particularly during the breeding season. However, the effect of artificial lights on the timing of behaviours during winter has received relatively little attention, despite the fact that time partitioning of foraging can have implications for avian winter survival. In this study, we assess at a landscape scale during winter, whether birds arrive at feeding stations earlier in areas with increased levels of artificial lighting using data from a citizen science project. Arrival times of the ten most commonly recorded species were associated with a combination of the density of artificial lights, temperature, rainfall and urban land cover. We found no evidence that birds advance the onset of foraging in gardens with more artificial lights nearby; contrary to our prediction, birds generally arrived later into these areas. This is possibly a response to differences in food availability or predation risk in areas with more artificial lights. We conclude that artificial light at night may not be as important for driving the timing of foraging behaviour in winter as previously thought, but it remains to be seen whether this represents a missed opportunity to extend the foraging period or an adaptive response.  
  Address British Trust for Ornithology, The Nunnery, Thetford, Norfolk, IP24 2PU, UK; gary.clewley(at)bto.org  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1083-8155 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (up) IDA @ john @ Serial 1316  
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Author Shapira, I.; Walker, E.; Brunton, D.H.; Raubenheimer, D. url  openurl
  Title Responses to direct versus indirect cues of predation and competition in naϊve invasive mice: implications for management Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication New Zealand Journal of Ecology Abbreviated Journal NZ J. of Ecol.  
  Volume 37 Issue 1 Pages 33-40  
  Keywords Animals; Mus musculus; mice; New Zealand; foraging; moonlight; giving-up density; GUD; moon phase  
  Abstract Many populations of invasive mice Mus musculus in New Zealand have experienced the removal of mammalian predators and competitors, with the consequence of mouse population irruptions. The effects of these removals on mouse foraging are largely unknown, yet this information is essential for developing and implementing better mouse control. We investigated the effects of direct and indirect predatory cues on foraging of free-ranging mice at a site where mammalian predators were eradicated 5 years previously. We used 17 stations, each containing four trays of millet seeds mixed thoroughly in sand, with three unfamiliar mammalian (a predator, a competitor, and a herbivore) odour treatments and a control (water), during the four phases of the moon. We measured mouse selectivity for treatment/control trays, giving-up densities (GUDs, a measure of food consumption), and tray encounter rates. Foraging by mice was not affected by odour cues from any of the unfamiliar mammals. Moonlight intensity, however, affected mouse foraging, with higher GUDs being recorded on brighter moon phases (full and waxing > new and waning) during the first night of the trials. This effect was less pronounced during the second night. Resource encounter rates were also affected, with the proportion of trays foraged lower during the brighter phases of the moon on both the first and second nights. We suggest that coordinating management efforts according to the phases of the moon has the potential to improve mouse control and reduce bait wastage.  
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  ISSN 01106465 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (up) IDA @ john @ Serial 1364  
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Author Anisimov, V.N.; Vinogradova, I.A.; Panchenko, A.V.; Popovich, I.G.; Zabezhinskii, M.A. url  openurl
  Title Light-at-Night-Induced Circadian Disruption, Cancer and Aging Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Current Aging Science Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 5 Issue 3 Pages 170-177  
  Keywords Animals; Light-at-night; aging; cancer; cardiovascular diseases; circadian; circadian rhythm; diabetes; disruption; melatonin; shift-work  
  Abstract Light-at-night has become an increasing and essential part of the modern lifestyle and leads to a number of health problems, including excessive body mass index, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and cancer. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Working Group concluded that “shift-work that involves circadian disruption is probably carcinogenic to humans” (Group 2A) [1]. According to the circadian disruption hypothesis, light-at-night might disrupt the endogenous circadian rhythm and specifically suppress nocturnal production of the pineal hormone melatonin and its secretion into the blood. We evaluated the effect of various light/dark regimens on the survival, life span, and spontaneous and chemical carcinogenesis in rodents. Exposure to constant illumination was followed by accelerated aging and enhanced spontaneous tumorigenesis in female CBA and transgenic HER-2/neu mice. In male and female rats maintained at various light/dark regimens (standard 12:12 light/dark [LD], the natural light [NL] of northwestern Russia, constant light [LL], and constant darkness [DD]) from the age of 25 days until natural death, it was found that exposure to NL and LL regimens accelerated age-related switch-off of the estrous function (in females), induced development of metabolic syndrome and spontaneous tumorigenesis, and shortened life span both in male and females rats compared to the standard LD regimen. Melatonin given in nocturnal drinking water prevented the adverse effect of the constant illumination (LL) and natural light (NL) regimens on the homeostasis, life span, and tumor development both in mice and rats. The exposure to the LL regimen accelerated colon carcinogenesis induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) in rats, whereas the treatment with melatonin alleviated the effects of LL. The maintenance of rats at the DD regimen inhibited DMH-induced carcinogenesis. The LL regimen accelerated, whereas the DD regimen inhibited both mammary carcinogenesis induced by N-nitrosomethylurea and transplacental carcinogenesis induced by N-nitrosoethylurea in rats. Treatment with melatonin prevented premature aging and tumorigenesis in rodents. The data found in the literature and our observations suggest that the use of melatonin would be effective for cancer prevention in humans at risk as a result of light pollution.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (up) LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 377  
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Author Kuijper, D.P.J.; Schut, J.; van Dullemen, D.; Toorman, H.; Goossens, N.; Ouwehand, J.; Limpens, H.J.G.A. url  openurl
  Title Experimental evidence of light disturbance along the commuting routes of pond bats (Myotis dasycneme) Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Lutra Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 51 Issue 1 Pages 37-49  
  Keywords Animals; ecological connectivity; conservation; illumination; foraging; turning behaviour  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (up) LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 404  
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Author Haag, C.R.; Riek, M.; Hottinger, J.W.; Pajunen, V.I.; Ebert, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Genetic diversity and genetic differentiation in Daphnia metapopulations with subpopulations of known age Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Genetics Abbreviated Journal Genetics  
  Volume 170 Issue 4 Pages 1809-1820  
  Keywords Plants; Aging; Animals; Daphnia/*genetics/*physiology; *Genetic Variation; *Genetics, Population  
  Abstract If colonization of empty habitat patches causes genetic bottlenecks, freshly founded, young populations should be genetically less diverse than older ones that may have experienced successive rounds of immigration. This can be studied in metapopulations with subpopulations of known age. We studied allozyme variation in metapopulations of two species of water fleas (Daphnia) in the skerry archipelago of southern Finland. These populations have been monitored since 1982. Screening 49 populations of D. longispina and 77 populations of D. magna, separated by distances of 1.5-2180 m, we found that local genetic diversity increased with population age whereas pairwise differentiation among pools decreased with population age. These patterns persisted even after controlling for several potentially confounding ecological variables, indicating that extinction and recolonization dynamics decrease local genetic diversity and increase genetic differentiation in these metapopulations by causing genetic bottlenecks during colonization. We suggest that the effect of these bottlenecks may be twofold, namely decreasing genetic diversity by random sampling and leading to population-wide inbreeding. Subsequent immigration then may not only introduce new genetic material, but also lead to the production of noninbred hybrids, selection for which may cause immigrant alleles to increase in frequency, thus leading to increased genetic diversity in older populations.  
  Address Unite d'Ecologie et d'Evolution, Departement de Biologie, Universite de Fribourg, CH-1700 Fribourg, Switzerland. christoph.haag@ed.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0016-6731 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:15937138; PMCID:PMC1449778 Approved no  
  Call Number (up) LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 660  
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