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Author Li, X.; Xu, H.; Chen, X.; Li, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Potential of NPP-VIIRS Nighttime Light Imagery for Modeling the Regional Economy of China Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing  
  Volume 5 Issue 6 Pages 3057-3081  
  Keywords nighttime light; gross regional product; Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite; linear regression  
  Abstract Historically, the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program’s Operational Linescan System (DMSP-OLS) was the unique satellite sensor used to collect the nighttime light, which is an efficient means to map the global economic activities. Since it was launched in October 2011, the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) sensor on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) Satellite has become a new satellite used to monitor nighttime light. This study performed the first evaluation on the NPP-VIIRS nighttime light imagery in modeling economy, analyzing 31 provincial regions and 393 county regions in China. For each region, the total nighttime light (TNL) and gross regional product (GRP) around the year of 2010 were derived, and a linear regression model was applied on the data. Through the regression, the TNL from NPP-VIIRS were found to exhibit R2 values of 0.8699 and 0.8544 with the provincial GRP and county GRP, respectively, which are significantly stronger than the relationship between the TNL from DMSP-OLS (F16 and F18 satellites) and GRP. Using the regression models, the GRP was predicted from the TNL for each region, and we found that the NPP-VIIRS data is more predictable for the GRP than those of the DMSP-OLS data. This study demonstrates that the recently released NPP-VIIRS nighttime light imagery has a stronger capacity in modeling regional economy than those of the DMSP-OLS data. These findings provide a foundation to model the global and regional economy with the recently availability of the NPP-VIIRS data, especially in the regions where economic census data is difficult to access.  
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  ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium  
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  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 201  
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Author Kessel, L.; Siganos, G.; Jorgensen, T.; Larsen, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sleep disturbances are related to decreased transmission of blue light to the retina caused by lens yellowing Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Sleep Abbreviated Journal Sleep  
  Volume 34 Issue 9 Pages 1215-1219  
  Keywords Adult; Age Factors; Aging/*pathology/physiology; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; Fluorometry; Humans; Lens, Crystalline/*pathology/physiopathology; *Light; Male; Middle Aged; Retina/*physiopathology; Risk Factors; *Scattering, Radiation; Sleep Disorders/*etiology; Circadian rhythm; cataract; melanopsin; sleep; blue light  
  Abstract STUDY OBJECTIVES: Sleep pattern and circadian rhythms are regulated via the retinohypothalamic tract in response to stimulation of a subset of retinal ganglion cells, predominantly by blue light (450-490 nm). With age, the transmission of blue light to the retina is reduced because of the aging process of the human lens, and this may impair the photoentrainment of circadian rhythm leading to sleep disorders. The aim of the study was to examine the association between lens aging and sleep disorders. DESIGN: Cross-sectional population based study. SETTING: The study was performed at the Research Center for Prevention and Health, Glostrup Hospital, Denmark and at the Department of Ophthalmology, Herlev Hospital, Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: An age- and sex-stratified sample of 970 persons aged 30 to 60 years of age drawn from a sample randomly selected from the background population. INTERVENTIONS: Not applicable. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Sleep disturbances were evaluated by a combination of questionnaire and the use of prescription sleeping medication. Lens aging (transmission and yellowing) was measured objectively by lens autofluorometry. The risk of sleep disturbances was significantly increased when the transmission of blue light to the retina was low, even after correction for the effect of age and other confounding factors such as smoking habits, diabetes mellitus, gender, and the risk of ischemic heart disease (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Filtration of blue light by the aging lens was significantly associated with an increased risk of sleep disturbances. We propose that this is a result of disturbance of photoentrainment of circadian rhythms.  
  Address Department of Ophthalmology, Glostrup Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. line.kessel@dadlnet.dk  
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  ISSN 0161-8105 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:21886359; PMCID:PMC3157663 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 344  
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Author Anisimov, V.N.; Vinogradova, I.A.; Panchenko, A.V.; Popovich, I.G.; Zabezhinskii, M.A. url  openurl
  Title Light-at-Night-Induced Circadian Disruption, Cancer and Aging Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Current Aging Science Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 5 Issue 3 Pages 170-177  
  Keywords Animals; Light-at-night; aging; cancer; cardiovascular diseases; circadian; circadian rhythm; diabetes; disruption; melatonin; shift-work  
  Abstract Light-at-night has become an increasing and essential part of the modern lifestyle and leads to a number of health problems, including excessive body mass index, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and cancer. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Working Group concluded that “shift-work that involves circadian disruption is probably carcinogenic to humans” (Group 2A) [1]. According to the circadian disruption hypothesis, light-at-night might disrupt the endogenous circadian rhythm and specifically suppress nocturnal production of the pineal hormone melatonin and its secretion into the blood. We evaluated the effect of various light/dark regimens on the survival, life span, and spontaneous and chemical carcinogenesis in rodents. Exposure to constant illumination was followed by accelerated aging and enhanced spontaneous tumorigenesis in female CBA and transgenic HER-2/neu mice. In male and female rats maintained at various light/dark regimens (standard 12:12 light/dark [LD], the natural light [NL] of northwestern Russia, constant light [LL], and constant darkness [DD]) from the age of 25 days until natural death, it was found that exposure to NL and LL regimens accelerated age-related switch-off of the estrous function (in females), induced development of metabolic syndrome and spontaneous tumorigenesis, and shortened life span both in male and females rats compared to the standard LD regimen. Melatonin given in nocturnal drinking water prevented the adverse effect of the constant illumination (LL) and natural light (NL) regimens on the homeostasis, life span, and tumor development both in mice and rats. The exposure to the LL regimen accelerated colon carcinogenesis induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) in rats, whereas the treatment with melatonin alleviated the effects of LL. The maintenance of rats at the DD regimen inhibited DMH-induced carcinogenesis. The LL regimen accelerated, whereas the DD regimen inhibited both mammary carcinogenesis induced by N-nitrosomethylurea and transplacental carcinogenesis induced by N-nitrosoethylurea in rats. Treatment with melatonin prevented premature aging and tumorigenesis in rodents. The data found in the literature and our observations suggest that the use of melatonin would be effective for cancer prevention in humans at risk as a result of light pollution.  
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  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 377  
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Author Kuijper, D.P.J.; Schut, J.; van Dullemen, D.; Toorman, H.; Goossens, N.; Ouwehand, J.; Limpens, H.J.G.A. url  openurl
  Title Experimental evidence of light disturbance along the commuting routes of pond bats (Myotis dasycneme) Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Lutra Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 51 Issue 1 Pages 37-49  
  Keywords Animals; ecological connectivity; conservation; illumination; foraging; turning behaviour  
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  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 404  
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Author Haag, C.R.; Riek, M.; Hottinger, J.W.; Pajunen, V.I.; Ebert, D. url  doi
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  Title Genetic diversity and genetic differentiation in Daphnia metapopulations with subpopulations of known age Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Genetics Abbreviated Journal Genetics  
  Volume 170 Issue 4 Pages 1809-1820  
  Keywords Plants; Aging; Animals; Daphnia/*genetics/*physiology; *Genetic Variation; *Genetics, Population  
  Abstract If colonization of empty habitat patches causes genetic bottlenecks, freshly founded, young populations should be genetically less diverse than older ones that may have experienced successive rounds of immigration. This can be studied in metapopulations with subpopulations of known age. We studied allozyme variation in metapopulations of two species of water fleas (Daphnia) in the skerry archipelago of southern Finland. These populations have been monitored since 1982. Screening 49 populations of D. longispina and 77 populations of D. magna, separated by distances of 1.5-2180 m, we found that local genetic diversity increased with population age whereas pairwise differentiation among pools decreased with population age. These patterns persisted even after controlling for several potentially confounding ecological variables, indicating that extinction and recolonization dynamics decrease local genetic diversity and increase genetic differentiation in these metapopulations by causing genetic bottlenecks during colonization. We suggest that the effect of these bottlenecks may be twofold, namely decreasing genetic diversity by random sampling and leading to population-wide inbreeding. Subsequent immigration then may not only introduce new genetic material, but also lead to the production of noninbred hybrids, selection for which may cause immigrant alleles to increase in frequency, thus leading to increased genetic diversity in older populations.  
  Address Unite d'Ecologie et d'Evolution, Departement de Biologie, Universite de Fribourg, CH-1700 Fribourg, Switzerland. christoph.haag@ed.ac.uk  
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  ISSN 0016-6731 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:15937138; PMCID:PMC1449778 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 660  
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